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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2016-2017

Program Info

Last Updated 2012-06-04

Industrial Engineering MS



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Introduction

Introduction to the Graduate Programs

The mission of the Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems is to be recognized as an academic and research leader through quality graduate programs. The industrial engineering graduate programs are structured to support Central Florida’s emergence as a national center of high technology, while also supporting the diverse service industries in the region and throughout the nation. The graduate program enrollment rate has also made the IEMS graduate program the second largest graduate program of all IE Departments in the country.

The IEMS Master’s programs attract well-qualified students with excellent engineering or scientific backgrounds.

Master’s Programs

The Master’s degree programs are designed to produce highly skilled industrial engineers, and other skilled professionals in areas such as human engineering, ergonomics, quality systems, systems engineering, system operation and modeling, Training systems and interactive simulation and  and leaders for the global economy.

The MS program provides an excellent Master’s level education for students in the Industrial Engineering MS degrees in Human Systems Engineering/Ergonomics, Interactive Simulation and Training Systems, Quality Systems Engineering, Systems operations and Modeling, and Systems Engineering. Each program area of specialty offers a curriculum that guarantees breadth and depth of course areas needed to adequately develop the knowledge base and expertise of students in the program.

Note for International Students

International students may only take one course per semester in a totally online format while attending UCF on a F-1 visa. Courses in this program can be taken in mixed mode for international students at UCF or fully online for international students who are not on visas. If you have questions, please consult the International Service Center at www.intl.ucf.edu.

Program Requirements

The MS curriculum offers tracks in Human Systems Engineering/Ergonomics, Interactive Simulation and Training Systems, Quality Systems Engineering, Systems Operations and Modeling, and Systems Engineering.

Degree Plan of Study

All graduate students need to complete their plan of study during the first semester of the graduate program. Students who have not yet established a plan of study, students who would like to change their current program, or students who have any questions about their current programs, need to talk to the Graduate Director as soon as possible. The plan of study is a contract specifying degree requirements between the student and the University of Central Florida. It is very important to have a plan of study established as soon as possible to assure that the student is meeting all requirements. An approved copy must be filed with the department.

The Plan of Study is the official contract between the student and the University of Central Florida.  It should be finished before completion of nine semester hours of graduate courses.  The Plan of Study specifies the required courses for the particular degree and identifies appropriate electives to support that degree.  Unlike undergraduate students, graduate students are not "under the catalog at time of admission." Program requirements change from time to time and students will generally have to meet the latest requirements unless previous requirements are specified in the approved Plan of Study. If a student has completed an undergraduate course similar to a required graduate course (e.g., discrete systems simulation), that particular graduate course will be waived and another course from the general area must be substituted. 

With regard to electives, the selected electives should support the area of study.  Generally, any course offered by the IEMS Department will be an acceptable elective.  In addition, courses offered by other engineering departments, computer science, mathematics, statistics, psychology, or business administration may be acceptable electives. Identification of electives must be done in a Plan of Study and approved by the Advisor and Graduate Director.

Plan of Study forms can be downloaded from the IEMS Website. After the student completes the form by identifying an anticipated course sequence, the anticipated semesters in which courses will be completed, and appropriate electives, the student will then obtain the Advisor's approval, and an official form will be generated on the computer for signature and approval. The Plan of Study may be revised as necessary with the approval of the Advisor and the IEMS Graduate Director.

IEMS Grievance Procedures

If a student feels that his or her grievance can be solved at the departmental level he/she must first go to the IEMS Graduate Director, to whom the student can confidentially disclose his/her concern. The Graduate Director will then make a decision based upon the most appropriate course of action. The standard grievance evaluation procedure will typically categorize the student’s grievance into one of three scenarios:

  1. The Graduate Director will evaluate and assess the matter and resolve the student’s grievance in the most appropriate manner.
  2. In student grievances involving a department faculty member, the Graduate director will refer the student to the Department Chair for assessment and resolution.
  3. If the student’s grievance concerns a discrepancy with a program level examination or program performance requirement, the Graduate Director will assign the student’s complaint to a faculty/student committee for review.

Curriculum

This program can be taken entirely through the Center for Online and Virtual Education (COVE), which provides video-streamed versions of classes over the Internet.  More information about this program can be found at http://www.cecs.ucf.edu/COVE/ or (407) 823-3814.

The Industrial Engineering MS program offers both thesis and nonthesis options with each requiring 30 credit hours of courses. The program is flexible to enable students to model their plan of study to suit their needs and future work or career goals. All students must develop a plan of study with the graduate program director that meets with departmental approval. At least one-half of the courses (including thesis hours) required in the master's program of study must be at the 6000 level or higher. A cumulative grade-point average of B (3.0) must be maintained in the entire program of study.

Students on assistantships must take 9 credit hours per semester (Fall, Spring) to satisfy the university's requirement for full-time status. Most students working full time take 6 credit hours per semester. At that rate, the program can be completed in 6 semesters or less. However, students with more time available and with an early start on a thesis, if applicable, can finish the program in 3 semesters.


Prerequisites

The Industrial Engineering MS program requires an undergraduate degree in engineering, mathematics, computer science, statistics, physics, quantitative management or similar field.

Outstanding students with degrees in other disciplines such as business, economics or computer/information sciences may also be considered on a case-by-case basis, provided they have significant work experience and/or very high academic standing.

Regardless of the undergraduate degree, all applicants must have completed the following prerequisites:

  • Mathematics through Calculus II (MAC 2312 or equivalent)
  • An undergraduate course in engineering probability and statistics.
  • In addition, they are expected to be familiar with at least one programming language (such as C, FORTRAN, Java, Visual BASIC, C++, etc.) and common computer skills and tools such as word processors and spreadsheets.

Required Courses—12 Credit Hours

  • ESI 5219 Engineering Statistics (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5140 Project Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6357 Advanced Engineering Economic Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6551 Systems Architecting (3 credit hours)

Elective Courses—12 Credit Hours

All students, both thesis and nonthesis, must take 12 credit hours of electives after consultation with their adviser.

Thesis Option—6 Credit Hours

The thesis option requires 6 credit hours of thesis. Thesis students must complete an independent research study and write and successfully defend a thesis according to program guidelines.

  • EIN 6971 Thesis (6 credit hours)

The College of Engineering and Computer Science requires that all thesis defense announcements are approved by the student's adviser and posted on the college's website (http://www.cecs.ucf.edu/graddefense/) and on the College of Graduate Studies Events Calendar at least two weeks before the defense date.

Nonthesis Option—6 Credit Hours

  • EIN 6950 Capstone Course in Industrial and Systems Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • Elective course (3 credit hours)

The nonthesis option requires  a capstone course and an additional nonrestricted elective course that supports the student's area of research and study interests. The capstone course should be completed toward the end of the student's graduate plan of study. As part of the requirements of this course, students will complete an independent capstone project on a topic relevant to the industrial and systems engineering field and approved by the instructor. Students are expected to use and leverage knowledge obtained in the program to complete the project. This course serves as the culminating experience for the students and shows their engagement in independent learning. 

IEMS Electives

The program requirements are flexible enough to allow the students to tailor the coursework according to their desired educational and career goals. With the approval of their adviser and/or the graduate program director, students may select from the following groups of courses to satisfy the needs of their research goals or career objectives. To assist the students in achieving these goals and objectives, courses are grouped below to suggest focus areas, only as a guide to assist in advising and course selection. They are not intended to restrict elective choices among specialization areas as the intent of the program is to help graduate students maintain an integrated approach to their studies. The listing of these courses does not guarantee that they will be offered by the department in a particular year or semester.

In addition to the courses listed below, students may be allowed to take courses from the following disciplines at UCF, with the approval of the graduate program director, as an elective in their graduate program of study:

  • Other Engineering programs
  • Computer Science
  • Mathematics
  • Statistics
  • Business Administration or Management
Human Systems Engineering/Ergonomics
  • EIN 5248C Ergonomics (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5251 Usability Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6270C Work Physiology (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6258 Human-Computer Interaction (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6279C Biomechanics (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6935 Advanced Ergonomics Topics (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6271 Human Reliability (3 credit hours)
Quality and Production Systems
  • ESI 6225 Quality Design and Control (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6224 Quality Management (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5392C Manufacturing Systems Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6336 Production and Inventory Control (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6425 Scheduling and Sequencing (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5356 Cost Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5227 Total Quality Improvement (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6247 Experimental Design and Taguchi Methods (3 credit hours)
Management Systems
  • EIN 6182 Engineering Management (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5117 Management Information Systems I (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6370 Innovation in Engineering Design (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6339 Operations Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5108 The Environment of Technical Organizations (3 credit hours)
Simulation, Optimization and Modeling
  • ESI 6336 Queuing Systems (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5306 Operations Research (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6418 Linear Programming and Extensions (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6532 Object-Oriented Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5531 Discrete Systems Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5255C Interactive Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6528 Simulation Based Life Cycle Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6645 Real-Time Simulation Agents (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6936 Seminar in Advanced Industrial Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5419C Engineering Applications of Linear and Nonlinear Optimization (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6217 Statistical Aspects of Digital Simulation (3 credit hours)
Systems Engineering
  • ESI 6358 Decision Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5359 Risk Assessment and Management (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6215 System Safety Engineering and Management (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5236 Reliability Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5346 Engineering Logistics (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6891 IEMS Research Methods (3 credit hours)

Equipment Fee

Full-time students in the Industrial Engineering MSIE program pay a $58 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled. Part-time students pay $29 each semester that they are enrolled. 


Track Curriculum: Accelerated BS to MS

The BSIE is awarded after fulfilling all university requirements including completing 128 credit hours of course work and 71 credit hours of engineering courses. The MSIE is awarded upon completion of the master’s program. Courses designated in General Education Program and Common Program Prerequisites are usually completed in the first 60 hours (see engineering major requirements in the Undergraduate Catalog).

Up to 12 credit hours of approved 5000-level courses with grades "B" (3.0) or better may be counted toward both the BS and MS degrees. Additional notes on the Accelerated Undergraduate and Graduate Program in Industrial Engineering are as follows:

  • Students who change degree programs and select this major must adopt the most current catalog.
  • Students must earn at least a "B" (3.0) in each undergraduate and graduate engineering course for them to be counted toward the major.

Undergraduate Requirements

Please see the current edition of the Undergraduate Catalog or the academics section of the College of Engineering and Computer Science website, link given above, for additional information about this program

Graduate Requirements

Please see Industrial Engineering MSIE graduate program for additional requirements.

Equipment Fee

Students in the Industrial Engineering MS program pay a $90 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled. For part-time students, the equipment fee is $45 per semester.


Track Curriculum: Healthcare Systems Engineering

The Healthcare Systems Engineering (HCSE) track requires 30 credit hours of courses beyond the bachelor's degree. This program offers only the nonthesis option. 

This web-based online master's program in Healthcare Systems Engineering is designed to attract students with a variety of educational backgrounds and keen interest in working in the healthcare field. It provides healthcare practitioners, and individuals with an engineering background who are interested in joining the rapidly expanding field of healthcare systems, with models and tools such as quantitative analysis, systems modeling and computer simulation for effective decision-making in healthcare organizations and systems.

For information about the program, please contact IEMS Graduate Director Dr. Ahmad Elshennawy (ahmad.elshennawy@ucf.edu) or   Dr. Richard Biehl (Richard.Biehl@ucf.edu).

Translating a specific design into an organizational or physical reality in the most effective manner, and with the highest quality, is the focus of the industrial Engineering and Management Systems field. This program is tailored to meet the needs of a broad range of working professionals interested in leading healthcare systems engineering and management activities. It is the first program of its kind, with no other university currently offering a similar program fully online.



Prerequisites

An undergraduate course in probability and statistics

Required Courses—30 Credit Hours

All of the following courses are required for completion of the Healthcare Systems Engineering program.

  • HSC 6636 Issues and Trends in the Health Professions (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5219 Engineering Statistics (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6551 Systems Architecting (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6357 Advanced Engineering Economic Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5531 Discrete Systems Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 5359 Risk Assessment and Management (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5117 Management Information Systems (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6224 Quality Management (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6609 Industrial Engineering Analytics for Healthcare (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5140 Project Engineering (Capstone) (3 credit hours)

Cost Per Credit Hour

For the Healthcare Systems Engineering track in the Industrial Engineering MS program, both for in-state and out-of-state, the cost per credit hour is $1,239.16.*

*Fee subject to change.


Course Schedule

IEMS’s Course Schedule until Summer 2017 can be found in the IEMS website (five year plan).

Examination Requirements

All IEMS graduate examinations may be retaken once if the student fails on his/her first attempt. This includes: Non-Thesis Oral Examination, Thesis Defense, Qualifying Examination, Candidacy Examination, and Dissertation Defense.

Non-Thesis Oral Examination

Unless their track includes a capstone course, all non-thesis students are required to pass an Oral Comprehensive Examination.  The Oral Comprehensive Examination provides an opportunity for graduating students to demonstrate their mastery of the knowledge they’ve gained in their plans of study and their ability to integrate the knowledge from the diverse courses they have taken. Typically, the duration of the plan of study is 2-4 years for a Master’s degree. While it is possible to proceed from one course to another satisfactorily, it is important that graduating students be able to synthesize the broad range of material included in their educational programs and address fundamental problems in their discipline. Another important element for graduating students is a demonstrated ability to communicate their knowledge and understanding. The Oral Comprehensive Examination gives students a chance to exhibit their knowledge and communication skills while at the same time showing that they can think critically and can integrate and synthesize the material learned throughout the program. The examination is usually scheduled between the 10th and 12th week of the final semester.

The Oral Comprehensive Examination is administered by a committee of 2-3 IEMS faculty members. It is the Graduate Director’s task to assign the committee members. The student does not have any input as to who serves on the committee.  Each student is given a case study approximately one week prior to the examination that forms the basis for the exam. Using the guidelines below, each student is required to give an oral presentation of the case to the committee and to respond to any questions that the committee members may have. Based on the presentation and the responses to the questions, the committee will determine whether the student passes. If the student does not pass, the committee will direct appropriate remedial work. This, as all other graduate examinations, may be retaken once if the student fails on his/her first attempt.

Non-Thesis Oral Examination Guidelines

The following guidelines apply to the Oral Comprehensive Examination:

  • Each student shall make an oral presentation that does not exceed 20 minutes. Failure to conclude the presentation within the allowed 20 minutes is unsatisfactory. 
  • Students shall develop their analysis and presentations individually and shall not collaborate with other students.
  • Students are encouraged to use visual aids such as PowerPoint, transparencies, and overhead projectors. Computer projection equipment is available for the exam.
  • Handouts facilitate understanding and are encouraged.

Non-Thesis Oral Examination Expectations

Each Oral Exam case statement represents a general description of an operating situation in an organization that signifies a typical example of the expertise a student will need for competent assistance and analysis. In each case instance, there will likely be a number of interrelated situations that require some type of analysis and critical thinking. The fundamental question that the student will need to address in his/her presentation is, “How would you identify and address the organization’s problem?”
A successful answer will depend on the student’s ability to integrate and apply the knowledge that he/she has acquired during his/her plan of study. Students should remember that they are not expected to “solve” the organization’s problems. The focus is on describing how one would go about the task of solving the problems, and the processes involved. They key word is “how” one would do these things and/or what specific tasks are required.
The student’s presentation should include the following elements:

  • General description of the operating conditions
  • Initial identification and classification of problems to be addressed
  • Approaches for clarifying problems
  • Methods and techniques to be used
  • Data requirements, collection, and analysis
  • Expected outcomes from the analysis

Non-Thesis Oral Examination Performance

The student’s performance will be evaluated on the following factors:

  • Ability to identify key elements in the organization’s problems
  • Ability to apply knowledge from the plan of study to the organization’s problems 
  • Ability to communicate effectively in the presentation

Thesis Requirements

University Thesis Requirements

A thesis is optional for this program; the following information is intended for those choosing to complete a thesis.

The College of Graduate Studies Thesis and Dissertation page contains information on the university’s requirements for thesis formatting, format review, defenses, final submission, and more. A step-by-step completion guide is also available at Completing Your Thesis or Dissertation.

All university deadlines are listed in the Academic Calendar. Your program or college may have other earlier deadlines; please check with your program and college staff for additional deadlines.

The following requirements must be met by thesis students in their final term:

  • Submit a properly formatted file for initial format review by the format review deadline
  • Submit the Thesis and Dissertation Release Option form well before the defense
  • Defend by the defense deadline
  • Receive format approval (if not granted upon initial review)
  • Submit signed approval form by final submission deadline
  • Submit final thesis document by final submission deadline

Students must format their thesis according to the standards outlined at Formatting the ETD. Formatting questions or issues can be submitted to the Format Help page in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. Format reviews and final submission must be completed in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. The Thesis Approval Form is also available in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site.

The College of Graduate Studies offers several thesis and dissertation Workshops each term. Students are highly encouraged to attend these workshops early in the thesis process to fully understand the above policies and procedures.

The College of Graduate Studies thesis and dissertation office is best reached by email at editor@ucf.edu.

Thesis Proposal and Committee Formation

Students pursuing a Master’s degree have the option of writing a thesis as part of their graduation requirement should they decide not to take the Oral Examination.  All students who are working on funded research projects are expected to complete a thesis. The purpose of a thesis is to demonstrate the student’s ability to do original research or to develop an original application of a particular methodology to a new area.  The thesis endeavor in the IEMS Department is a two semester enterprise, composed of a thesis proposal and a thesis defense. Initially the student will register for 3 thesis hours designated for the thesis proposal and once he/she passes the proposal, the student will be allowed to register for an additional 3 hours to complete the defense. Students may only register for 3 thesis hours per semester, and must allow for one semester’s length between proposal and defense.

In beginning the process, the student must first develop a relevant thesis topic and then approach a faculty member about serving as his/her thesis committee chairperson.  This topic can develop from an advisor's interests, the student's interests, or the funded research being conducted (where cases permit).  For those students working on research projects, it is typically required that the thesis be related to the funded research being done by the student. 

It is the student's responsibility to develop the thesis topic and proposal, and to convince the potential chairperson that it is a worthy topic and that he/she should be willing to commit significant time to advise the student on the topic.

The thesis committee should be formed prior to the student registering for thesis hours, and must include at least three members; two of the members of the committee must be from the IEMS Department.  Thesis committee membership must be approved by the Department Chair at the time that it is formed.

If the Master’s student and thesis committee chairperson/advisor agree on a topic, the student must prepare a thesis proposal for the Committee which lays out the direction and extent of the research.  The proposal should describe the research expectations and recognize how the contribution is identified.  This is, in a sense, a second contract that specifies the expected level of effort and outcome that will satisfy the thesis requirement.

The student and advisor are responsible for the proper preparation of the written thesis.  Normally, the student submits draft copies to the advisor for review.  A draft copy must be also approved by the College of Graduate Studies for format considerations. After appropriate revisions, a revised draft is submitted to the thesis committee members for their review at least two weeks prior to the scheduled defense date. Comments from the committee members are usually submitted to the student at the time of the defense. After the defense, the various comments are addressed in a final revision that is submitted to the advisor and the committee for final approval.  Students should anticipate that this review cycle can be time consuming. Once the student has completed the revision process and passed his/her thesis defense, an electronic copy of the student’s thesis must be submitted for University archives and academic access.

If a student does not finish the thesis in his/her second semester, the student may register for one additional hour of thesis in the following semester (up to a maximum of two semesters) to finish. If for some reason the student does not finish the thesis defense in the overall maximum of four semesters the student may choose to either change to the non-thesis option or leave the program. If the student changes to the non-thesis option, the thesis hours completed may not be used as part of the new plan of study.

Thesis Defense

Every thesis is defended in a public forum.  The student should schedule the defense with the advisor and the committee members at a mutually agreeable time.  University-wide notice must be given at least one week before the scheduled defense.  It is the student's responsibility to ensure that the proper notice is prepared and distributed (see Thesis Manual for format) in time to meet this deadline.  The student is responsible for securing a suitable room for presenting the thesis defense.  In preparing for the thesis defense, the student should work with the advisor to develop a suitable presentation.  Note that not all students pass the thesis defense the first time.  Students should allow sufficient slack in the semester in case a repeat defense is required. If for some reason the student does not pass the thesis defense on a second attempt the student may choose to either change to the non-thesis option or leave the program. If the student changes to the non-thesis option, the thesis hours completed may not be used as part of the new plan of study.

If the student does pass his/her thesis defense, an electronic copy of the student’s thesis must be submitted for University archives and academic access.

For a thesis (EIN 6971), or doctoral dissertation (EIN 7980), satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U) grades are used to reflect student progress in these courses. Should a student in a given term be given an incomplete (I), then this grade should be changed to an S or U, upon completion of the work. Other grades may not be assigned in these courses. Students who do not maintain satisfactory progress in their research, as determined by their thesis or dissertation advisory committee, may be reverted to post-baccalaureate status.

For further information of thesis and dissertation matters please refer to the “Thesis and Dissertation Advisory Committee” section of the UCF Graduate Catalog

Graduate Research

Faculty Research

The Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems faculty members are all actively involved in research projects and collaborations in addition to their teaching responsibilities. Some of the companies and agencies for whom IEMS faculty do research are

  • National Science Foundation (NSF)
  • Office of Naval Research
  • Environmental Research and Education Foundation
  • Walt Disney World Co.
  • Boeing Company
  • Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC)
  • United Space Alliance
  • Technology Solutions, Inc.
  • NASA
  • US Army

Current faculty research projects and interests include, but are not limited to:

  • Quality management and performance excellence
  • Lean six sigma applications in manufacturing, service and healthcare organizations
  • Business process reengineering
  • Manufacturing systems engineering
  • Strategic management
  • Strategic planning
  • Organizational transformations and change management
  • Program/project management.
  • Modeling and simulation
  • Multicriteria optimization
  • Data mining
  • Applied operations research
  • Sustainability in supply chain networks
  • Facility logistics
  • Applied Operations Research
  • Supply Chain Management Modeling
  • Distribution Center Design
  • Healthcare Logistics
  • Data mining including supervised and unsupervised learning and their applications in Industrial Engineering and Biomedicine
  • Optimization methods in data mining
  • Network analysis with application to infrastructure reliability
  • Operations research 

To learn more, please visit iems.ucf.edu/research/index.html.

Financial Support

Graduate Assistantships and Fellowships

The Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems employs a number of graduate teaching assistants and researchers in order to aid students financially during their academic careers. IEMS holds potential graduate assistants to the same application requirements as all other university departments.

Required Courses—12 Credit Hours
• ESI 5219 Engineering Statistics (3 credit hours)
• ESI 5531 Discrete Systems Simulation (3 credit hours)
• ESI 6217 Statistical Aspects of Digital Simulation (3 credit hours)
• ESI 6532 Object-Oriented Simulation (3 credit hours)

tial graduate assistants to the same application requirements as all other University departments. Applic

Required Courses—12 Credit Hours
• ESI 5219 Engineering Statistics (3 credit hours)
• ESI 5531 Discrete Systems Simulation (3 credit hours)
• ESI 6217 Statistical Aspects of Digital Simulation (3 credit hours)
• ESI 6532 Object-Oriented Simulation (3 credit hours)

ants can find this information in the UCF Graduate Catalog online, and for specific IEMS fellowships and assistantships please visit the IEMS website

Graduate Teaching Assistant applicants who have English as their second language will be evaluated as part of the GTA Orientation that is offered in August each year by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning. This requirement applies to all students from countries where English is not the native language; however, such students will be exempt if they have completed a previous degree from an accredited U.S. college or university. Only exempted students and those who have attended the GTA Orientation and satisfactorily passed the evaluation of their English-speaking skills may be employed as GTAs. More information on this requirement can be obtained in the UCF Graduate Catalog.

Students employed as Graduate Assistants, Graduate Teaching Assistants, or in any other paid position serving the University of Central Florida are wholly responsible for assuring timely receipt of financial support (i.e. submitting time sheets, tuition waivers, etc.). Within the Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems students must follow the pay periods established by the University and submit their time cards every two weeks. If a student fails to turn in his/her time card before the end of the designated pay period, his or her hours will be processed during the next pay cycle. The duration of the student’s financial support correlates with his or her status as either a student or student worker within IEMS; it is up to the discretion of the Department to determine the full duration of a student’s financial support.

All international students attending the University of Central Florida are encouraged to apply for employment within the school, but in order to do so students must have their I-20 authorized by the International Services Center (ISC) before such employment can begin. For more information on the requirements for the employment of international students please visit the International Student Employment section of the Graduate Catalog.

Graduate Student Associations

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is UCF's graduate organization committed to enrich graduate students' personal, educational and professional experience. To learn more or get involved, please visit www.gsa.ucf.edu. For individual department or graduate program organizations, please see program advisor. 

Professional Development

Graduate Certificates

The Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems offers students wishing to expand their areas of knowledge and expertise seven graduate certificate options: Applied Operations Research; Design for Usability, Industrial Ergonomics and Safety, Project Engineering, Quality Assurance, Systems Simulation for Engineers, and Training Simulation.

All students, including current UCF Master’s, specialist, or doctoral students, must complete an application that designates the graduate certificate that they wish to obtain. Students can apply for a specific graduate certificate online at www.graduate.ucf.edu, and it is important that they do so, since students who do not submit an application and gain admittance to the graduate certificate program will not be processed for graduate certificate completion.

The Graduate Certificate Completion Form can be downloaded from the Forms and Files section on the Graduate Students website or it can be obtained on the IEMS website. This form should be filled out completely, and all required courses listed. The program director for the certificate program is responsible for reviewing the courses listed. Please refer to the policies, which are more stringent than those for degree programs: grades must be “B-”(2.75) or better, no transfer courses can be used, no internship or independent study courses may be used, a course may not apply to more than one certificate program, graduate credit hours taken at UCF less than three years previously from a prior Baccalaureate, Master’s, specialist, or doctoral degree may be applied toward a certificate, with the consent of the program. Course substitutions should not be used; the graduate certificate program is a focused and specific course of study. For more information on graduate certificate application please visit the UCF Graduate Catalog.

Applied Operations Research Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Applied Operations Research prepares individuals with an overview and hands-on experience of Operations Research (OR) tools.

Required Courses—9 Credit Hours
• ESI 5219 Engineering Statistics (3 credit hours)
• ESI 5306 Operations Research (3 credit hours)
• ESI 5531 Discrete Systems Simulation (3 credit hours)

Elective Course—3 Credit Hours
Choose one of the following three courses.
• ESI 6336 Queuing Systems (3 credit hours)
• ESI 6358 Decision Analysis (3 credit hours)
• ESI 6418 Linear Programming and Extensions (3 credit hours)

Design for Usability Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Design for Usability prepares students in the methods of user-centered design usability engineering that can be used to assess and assure usability throughout a product, service or system development cycle.

Required Courses—12 Credit Hours
• EIN 5248C Ergonomics (3 credit hours)
• EIN 5251 Usability Engineering (3 credit hours)
• EIN 6258 Human Computer Interaction (3 credit hours)
• ESI 6247 Experimental Design and Taguchi Methods (3 credit hours)

Industrial Ergonomics and Safety Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Industrial Ergonomics and Safety prepares students in the design and implementation of an effective human engineering/ergonomics effort within an occupational setting.

Required Courses—15 Credit Hours
• EIN 5248C Ergonomics (3 credit hours)
• EIN 6215 System Safety Engineering and Management (3 credit hours)

Elective Course—3 Credit Hours
Choose one of the following three courses.
• EIN 6279C Biomechanics (3 credit hours)
• EIN 6264C Industrial Hygiene (3 credit hours)
• EIN 6270C Work Physiology (3 credit hours)

Project Engineering Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Project Engineering is designed to meet the needs of engineers moving into management and other leadership roles.

Required Courses—9 Credit Hours
• EIN 5108 The Environment of Technical Organizations (3 credit hours)
• EIN 5117 Management Information Systems I (3 credit hours)
• EIN 5140 Project Engineering (3 credit hours)

Elective Course—3 Credit Hours
Choose one of the following two courses.
• EIN 6357 Advanced Engineering Economic Analysis (3 credit hours)
• ESI 6358 Decision Analysis (3 credit hours)

Quality Assurance Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Quality Assurance is designed to provide students with the knowledge they need to increase process and product performance and to improve the quality and reliability of goods and services in any manufacturing, healthcare, and other service organizations.

Required Courses—9 Credit Hours
• ESI 5219 Engineering Statistics (3 credit hours)
• ESI 5236 Reliability Engineering (3 credit hours)
• ESI 6225 Quality Design and Control (3 credit hours)

Elective Course—3 Credit Hours
Choose one of the following two courses.
• ESI 5227 Total Quality Improvement (3 credit hours)
• ESI 6224 Quality Management (3 credit hours)

Systems Engineering Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Systems Engineering is designed to provide students with an introduction to systems engineering tools and techniques for better system performance.

Required Courses—12 Credit Hours
• ESI 5219 Engineering Statistics (3 credit hours)
• ESI 5531 Discrete Systems Simulation (3 credit hours)
• ESI 5306 Operations Research (3 credit hours)
• ESI 6551C Systems Engineering (3 credit hours)

Systems Simulation for Engineers Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Systems Simulation for Engineers provides students with an introduction to the area of advanced simulation modeling.

Required Courses—12 Credit Hours
• ESI 5219 Engineering Statistics (3 credit hours)
• ESI 5531 Discrete Systems Simulation (3 credit hours)
• ESI 6217 Statistical Aspects of Digital Simulation (3 credit hours)
• ESI 6532 Object-Oriented Simulation (3 credit hours)

Training Simulation Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Training Simulation provides students with the development and use of training simulations.

Required Courses—12 Credit Hours
• EIN 5255C Interactive Simulation (3 credit hours)
• EIN 6645 Real-Time Simulation Agents (3 credit hours)
• EME 6613 Instructional System Design (3 credit hours)

Professional Development Programs

The University of Central Florida offers students the opportunities to continue their professional development by participating in a variety of programs.

The Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Certificate Program (known before as GTA Certificate Program), sponsored by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning, offers those graduate students interested in teaching university courses during their time of study at UCF, the opportunity to gain the skills necessary to do so. Students participating in the program will receive group and individualized instruction by Faculty Center staff and experienced UCF professors, as well as textbooks and materials. For more information on the Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Certificate Program and its requirements please visit www.fctl.ucf.edu/Events/GTAPrograms/.

The University of Central Florida employs a Career Services and Experimental Learning Facility to aid students in their endeavors through their academic careers and after. Please visit the Career Services and Experimental Learning Facility website, www.career.ucf.edu, for more information on the services offered.

The College of Graduate Studies sponsors a Graduate Research Forum which features poster displays and oral presentations representing UCF’s diverse colleges and disciplines. The Research Forum is an opportunity for students to showcase their research and creative projects and to receive valuable feedback from faculty judges. For more information on the Graduate Research Forum please visit www.graduate.ucf.edu/researchforum.

Pathways to Success Workshops

Coordinated by the College of Graduate Studies, the Pathways to Success program offers free development opportunities for graduate students including workshops in Academic Integrity, Graduate Grantsmanship, Graduate Teaching, Personal Development, Professional Development, and Research. For more information and how to register, please visit www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/pathways/.

Internships

For information concerning internships, please visit the IEMS website, or make an appointment to speak with the Associate Chair directly.

Awards and Special Recognition

UCF sponsors awards for excellence in graduate student teaching and for excellence in thesis and dissertation research. University-level award winners will receive $1,500 cash awards. For more information regarding the application/nomination process please visite the Graduate Studies website.

Job Search

UCF’s Career Services department offers a wide range of programs and services designed to assist graduate students. These services include evaluation and exploration of career goals, preparation for the job search and job search resources. To learn more, visit their website at www.career.ucf.edu.

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