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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2013-2014

Exceptional Student Education K-12 MA


 

Introduction

Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

 

Academic Integrity

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

 

Degree Requirements

Florida Performance Standards for Teachers of English for Speakers of Other Languages

The ESOL teacher is able to:

  1. Conduct ESOL programs within the parameters, goals, and stipulations of the Florida Consent Decree.

  2. Recognize the major differences and similarities among the different cultural groups in the United States.

  3. Identify, expose, and reexamine cultural stereotypes relating to LEP and non-LEP students.

  4. Use knowledge of the cultural characteristics of Florida’s LEP population to enhance instruction.

  5. Determine and use appropriate instructional methods and strategies for individuals and groups, using knowledge of first and second language acquisition processes.

  6. Apply current and effective ESOL teaching methodologies in planning and delivering instruction to LEP students.

  7. Locate and acquire relevant resources in ESOL methodologies.

  8. Select and develop appropriate ESOL content according to student levels of proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, taking into account:

    Basic interpersonal communicative skills (BICS)

    Cognitive academic language proficiency skills (CALPS) as they apply to the ESOL curriculum.

  9. Develop experiential and interactive literacy activities for LEP students, using current information on linguistic and cognitive processes.

  10. Analyze student language and determine appropriate instructional strategies, using knowledge of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and discourse.

  11. Apply essential strategies for developing and integrating the four language skills of listening comprehension, oral communication, reading, and writing.

  12. Apply content-based ESOL approaches to instruction.

  13. Evaluate, design, and employ instructional methods and techniques appropriate to learner’s socialization and communication needs, based on knowledge of language as a social phenomenon.

  14. Plan and evaluate instructional outcomes, recognizing the effects of race, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and religion on the results.

  15. Evaluate, select, and employ appropriate instructional materials, media, and technology for ESOL at elementary, middle, and high school levels.

  16. Design and implement effective unit plans and daily lesson plans which meet the needs of ESOL students within the context of the regular classroom.

  17. Evaluate, adapt and employ appropriate instructional materials, media, and technology for ESOL in the content areas at elementary, middle and high school levels.

  18. Create a positive classroom environment to accommodate the various learning styles and cultural backgrounds of students.

  19. Consider current trends and issues related to the testing of linguistic and culturally diverse students when using testing instruments and techniques.

  20. Administer tests and interpret test results, applying basic measurement concepts.

  21. Use formal and alternative methods of assessments/evaluation of LEP students, including measurement of language, literacy and academic content metacognition.

  22. Develop and implement strategies for using school, neighborhood, and home resources in the ESOL curriculum.

  23. Identify major attitudes of local target groups toward school, teachers, discipline, and education in general that may lead to misinterpretation by school personnel; reduce cross-cultural barriers between students, parents, and the school setting.

  24. Develop, implement, and evaluate instructional programs in ESOL, based on current trends in research and practice.

  25. Recognize indicators of learning disabilities, especially hearing and language impairment, and limited English proficiency.

Students will be responsible for collecting, reviewing, and selecting appropriate artifacts that demonstrate proficiency in each of the 25 Florida ESOL Standards. Please obtain a copy of the Sample TESOL-In-Progress (TIP) Sheet from the program staff for more details.

 

Curriculum

Foundation Core/Co-requisites

These foundation core/co-requisite courses are prescribed by Florida State Statutes for initial teacher preparation (ITP). Students entering the Exceptional Student Education MA program without prior related courses and/or appropriate teacher certifications may need to complete courses in the Foundation Core/Co-requisite area.

If a student has successfully completed equivalent courses in the Foundation Core/Co-requisite area, as prescribed by Florida State Statutes for initial teacher preparation, then course waivers can be requested (see adviser).

  • EEX 5051 Exceptional Children in the Schools (3 credit hours). Students are strongly advised to enroll in EEX 5051 early in their graduate program.
  • EDF 6727 Critical Analysis of Social, Ethical, Legal, and Safety Issues Related to Education (3 credit hours)
  • EDG 6415 Principles of Instruction and Classroom Management (3 credit hours)
  • EDF 6237 Principles of Learning and Introduction to Classroom Assessment (3 credit hours)
  • RED 5147 Developmental Reading (3 credit hours)
  • RED 5517 Classroom Diagnosis (3 credit hours). Please note that RED 5517 is currently not available online.

Required Courses—30 Credit Hours

Core—9 Credit Hours

  • EDF 6481 Fundamentals of Graduate Research in Education (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 5085 Teaching Language Minority Students in K-12 Classrooms (3 credit hours)
  • TSL 6250 Applied Linguistics in ESOL (3 credit hours)

TSL 5085 and TSL 6250 are required courses leading to ESOL endorsement. Students should see an adviser if they hold a current ESOL endorsement.

Specialization—21 Credit Hours

  • EEX 6061 Instructional Strategies PreK-6 (3 credit hours)
  • EEX 6065 Programming for Students with Disabilities at the Secondary Level (3 credit hours)
  • EEX 6107 Teaching Spoken and Written Language (3 credit hours)
  • EEX 6295 Assessment and Curriculum Prescriptions for the Exceptional Population (3 credit hours)
  • EEX 6524 Organization and Collaboration in Special Ed (3 credit hours)
  • EEX 6612 Methods of Behavioral Management (3 credit hours)
  • EEX 6342 Seminar: Cricial Issues in Special Education (3 credit hours)

Internship and Practicum—9 Credit Hours

  • EEX 6946 Graduate Internship: ESE (6 credit hours)
  • RED 5948 Practicum in Reading Assessment and Instruction (3 credit hours)

Additional Graduation Requirements

  • Pass all applicable sections of the Florida Teacher Certification Examination. See http://www.fl.nesinc.com/ or www.fldoe.org for additional information about test dates and resources.
  • Pass Comprehensive Exam.
  • Complete a LiveText Professional Portfolio.
  • Complete a TESOL Portfolio.
  • Compliance with all university and graduate student policies.
 

Timeline for Completion

Frequently Asked Questions

1. How did the ESOL endorsement requirement originate?

In 1990, a suit was issued against the State of Florida by a united group of organizations for Florida’s failure to make accommodations in instruction to ensure the academic success of all ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) students. The resultant mandate, the Consent Decree, requires ESOL training for every Florida teacher having at least one ESOL student in his/her class.

Previously a responsibility of school districts, the state-mandated training has shifted to Florida colleges of education in all state-approved initial teacher certification programs. The Florida Department of Education has stipulated that graduates of initial teacher certification programs in the state’s universities receive ESOL training. Education majors thus graduate with the required ESOL training for their particular program area.

ESOL training for teachers primarily responsible for language development and literacy (i.e., Early Childhood, Elementary Education, Exceptional Education, and English Language Arts teachers) has been extensive. The training, which qualifies teachers for the ESOL endorsement, has typically consisted of 300 hours of in-service credit or 15 semester hours of courses addressing the following areas: methods of teaching ESOL, ESOL curriculum and materials development, cross-cultural communication, applied linguistics, and assessment.

2. What is the distinction between a subject area certification and an endorsement?

A subject area certification, or coverage, is defined as the area in which an individual has a content knowledge base, such as exceptional education, early childhood, math, biology, English, etc. An endorsement signifies a pedagogical knowledge base, which targets particular levels, stages of development, or circumstances. Consequently, a graduate in English could obtain a certificate in English (6-12), which would be appropriate for teaching secondary English. However, in order to teach ESOL students in the secondary setting, the English major would also have to have the ESOL endorsement, which signifies proficiency in teaching such students. Once the ESOL endorsement is placed on the teaching certificate, the endorsement remains on the certificate indefinitely. Obtaining the ESOL endorsement enables educators to not only teach ESOL students within mainstream classes (e.g., a "regular" third grade class or a high school English literature class), but it also qualifies educators to teach self-contained ESOL classes at the grade levels for which the educator is certified (e.g., K-6, 6-12, etc.). This means that an ESOL-endorsed Early Childhood, Elementary, English, or Exceptional Education teacher may be employed as a full-time ESOL teacher—that is why the Florida Department of Education requirements for obtaining the ESOL Endorsement through Infusion are so stringent.

3. Will I be required to take the ESOL subject area portion of the Florida Teacher Certification Exam (FTCE)?

No.

4. Who is required to graduate with the ESOL endorsement?

Students pursuing initial certification in Exceptional Education through the Masters of Arts certificate program who are not currently ESOL endorsed must complete all of the requirements to qualify for ESOL endorsement. These program areas are the areas primarily responsible for language development and literacy. This requirement began with Masters students under the 2007-2008 catalog.

5. What is required to get the ESOL endorsement?

For years, the State of Florida has been requiring in-service teachers to take 300 hours of in-service  ESOL training or 15 semester hours covering five required topics: (a) Methods of Teaching ESOL, (b) ESOL Curriculum and Materials Development, (c) Cross-Cultural

Communication, (d) Understanding Applied Linguistics, and (e) Testing and Evaluation of ESOL. The State now requires as a graduation requirement the same content for pre-service teachers. However, instead of having five stand-alone courses to meet the requirement, UCF has a state-approved infusion model that includes two stand-alone courses, TSL 5085 (previously numbered TSL 5373 and TSL 5528): Teaching Language Minority Students in the K-12 Classroom and TSL 6250: Applied Linguistics in ESOL. TSL 5085 should be taken during the student’s first semester in the master’s program since it explains the infusion model requirements and establishes the documentation system (TESOL portfolio) for the 25 ESOL Performance Standards. The model also consists of the infusion of the 25 ESOL performance standards throughout the curriculum, including field experiences. The infusion of the standards throughout coursework is documented in a TESOL Portfolio. The infusion of the standards in field experiences is documented in an ESOL Performance Profile. The Florida Department of Education gives teacher education institutions a choice in how they will meet the ESOL endorsement requirement: 1) Add 15 credits to each degree; 2) Add 6 credits to each degree and require faculty ESOL training, infused ESOL Performance Standards in most courses, a TESOL portfolio (documentation of ESOL Performance Standard attainment) and ESOL field experiences. The 6-credit option saves undergraduate students over $1,000 and graduate students over $2,500 in tuition. In addition, it saves students 180 hours of class time.

6. What exactly does UCF’s College of Education ESOL Endorsement Infusion Model look like in the Masters of Arts program in Exceptional Education?

UCF’s College of Education ESOL Endorsement Infusion Model consists of the following components:

  • TSL 5085 (previously numbered TSL 5373 and TSL 5528): Teaching Language

    Minority Students in K-12 Classrooms (3 hours) – Stand-alone course; overview course covering the five areas specified by the Consent Decree. This course should be taken during the student’s first semester in the master’s program since it explains the infusion model requirements and establishes the documentation system (TESOL portfolio) for the 25 ESOL Performance Standards.

  • TSL 6250: Applied Linguistics in ESOL (3 hours) – Stand-alone course in applied linguistics; taught by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures in the College of Arts and Humanities.

  • Infusion of the 25 ESOL Performance Standards in foundation and content courses. The infusion focuses on methods, materials, and assessment strategies. This infusion is documented by means of a TESOL Portfolio that is maintained by majors in Exceptional Education receiving their initial teaching certification in the Masters of Arts program who are not previously ESOL endorsed.

  • Field experiences and internships with ESOL experiences. Although Internship is the only field experience/internship in which ESOL experiences are required, it is highly recommended that students qualifying for ESOL Endorsement be given further opportunities in other field experiences so they can gain additional experience in working with ESOL students. Students’ interaction with ESOL students is documented and assessed on the ESOL Performance Profile.

    9. What courses are infused with the 25 ESOL performance standards?

    Exceptional Education catalog year 2007-2008 and after: see the ESE ESOL Matrix in this handbook.

    There are also two Stand-Alone ESOL Courses:

  • TSL 5085: Teaching Language Minority Students in K-12 Classrooms(previously numbered TSL 5373 and TSL 5528). This is an introductory course addressing the five required ESOL topics: (a) Methods of Teaching ESOL, (b) ESOL Curriculum and Materials Development, (c) Cross-Cultural Communication, (d)Understanding Applied Linguistics, and (e) Testing and Evaluation of ESOL. Each of these topics is further developed in the infused courses listed above. This course should be taken during the student’s first semester in the master’s program since it explains the infusion model requirements and establishes the documentation system (TESOL portfolio) for the 25 ESOL Performance Standards.

  • TSL 6250: Issues in Applied Linguistics in ESOL. This course is an applied linguistics course for future teachers. It focuses on English phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics.

10. My catalog year is prior to 2007-2008. Am I eligible for the ESOL Endorsement?

To be eligible for the ESOL Endorsement, the student should have met the following criteria:

  • He/she should have completed all of the ESOL-infused courses in his/her program.

  • He/she should have maintained a TESOL portfolio.

  • He/she should have taken both TSL 5085 (previously numbered TSL 5373 and TSL 5528) and TSL 6250.

  • He/she should have planned, implemented, and evaluated instruction for one or more English language learners under the supervision of an ESOL-certified/endorsed teacher (if the teacher is pursuing the endorsement, an ESOL-endorsed/certified teacher may assist with the supervision of the ESOL component) for a period of multiple (minimum 2) weeks. This typically takes place during the final internship, but special arrangements, such as summer reading camps, are possible if necessary.

If the student meets the four criteria, he/she will be eligible for the ESOL Endorsement as long as his/her Internship includes a planned ESOL experience. All Exceptional Education majors seeking the ESOL endorsement must be placed with an ESOL-endorsed teacher or a teacher currently working on his/her ESOL endorsement. If such a placement is not possible, then at least two weeks of the student’s Internship must be with an ESOL-endorsed teacher and ESOL students.

Since students with a catalog year prior to 2007 are not required to get the ESOL endorsement, the Office of Clinical Experiences will not attempt to place them with an ESOL-endorsed teacher for Internship. It is thus imperative that students who have a catalog year prior to 2007, but who want the ESOL endorsement, notify the Office of Clinical Experiences of their intent to qualify for the endorsement. Without this notification, the Office of Clinical Experiences has no way of knowing that the student must be placed in an ESOL-infused internship.

11. What is the TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) Portfolio?

The TESOL Portfolio is a student-prepared portfolio that documents the infusion of the 25 ESOL performance standards into the UCF teacher certification program. This portfolio is prepared by students enrolled in the Exceptional Education M.A. program. There is a complete listing of the possible assignments/products that can be included as evidence in the TESOL Portfolio in the Sample TIP Sheet included in this handbook.

12. When is the TESOL Portfolio introduced?

The TESOL Portfolio is introduced in TSL 5085 (previously numbered TSL 5373 and TSL 5528).  This course should be taken during the student’s first semester in the master’s program since it explains the infusion model requirements and establishes the documentation system (TESOL portfolio) for the 25 ESOL Performance Standards. If a student is unable to enroll in TSL 5085 during the first semester, it is thus imperative that Masters of Arts majors in Exceptional Education who are not currently ESOL endorsed take TSL 5085 as early as possible in their teacher education program. Waiting until the last minute to take TSL5085 and to begin compiling the TESOL Portfolio could seriously jeopardizesatisfactory completion of Internship and consequently, graduation.

13. How should the TESOL Portfolio be compiled?

Students should compile their evidence into a TESOL Portfolio, which is to be organized according to the courses in the student’s program, including Internship. Each of the infused courses is to include opportunities to demonstrate proficiency in the ESOL performance standards assigned to that course. The specific ESOL performance standards addressed by the course are to be listed in the course syllabus.

Students will be responsible for organizing the pieces of evidence generated in each ESOL infused and ESOL stand-alone course to demonstrate their proficiency in the 25 ESOL performance standards. Instructor feedback must be evident on the piece of evidence. This feedback could be a grade, a comment, or even a checkmark. As students receive evaluated ESOL assignments in their courses, they should place them in the appropriate section of the TESOL Portfolio.

In order to cross-reference the 25 ESOL performance standards, it is highly recommended that students write across the top of the assignment the ESOL performance standard(s) being addressed, as specified in the course syllabus. Depending on how the instructor designed an assignment, the same piece of evidence may be used to address more than one ESOL performance standard.

14. How many assignments should be included in each section of the TESOL Portfolio (i.e., each ESOL-infused course)?

The number of assignments to be included for each ESOL-infused course is dictated by the number of ESOL-related assignments required by the specific course. Ideally, each ESOLinfused course should require at least two ESOL-related assignments for inclusion in the TESOL Portfolio.

15. I’ve heard there is a TIP sheet that is supposed to go into my TESOL Portfolio. What is it and how do I get a copy of it?

The TIP (TESOL-in-Progress) sheet documents the ESOL Performance Standards that have been addressed throughout a student’s tenure in the teacher education program. In essence, it documents the infusion of the 25 ESOL Performance Standards throughout the teacher preparation curriculum. See the sample of a TIP sheet included in this handbook.

The TIP sheet is arranged according to the 25 ESOL Performance Standards rather than according to ESOL-infused courses. It is arranged this way so that students do not have to make multiple copies of assignments that may address more than one standard. In addition, the format of the TIP sheet provides an easy way to check a student’s progress in satisfying the 25 ESOL performance standards.

The TIP sheet is to be included in this Handbook. As students receive evaluated ESOL pieces of evidence in their courses, they should record on the TIP sheet next to the standard addressed, the title of each piece of evidence, the prefix and number of the course and semester/year during which the piece of evidence was created. Download the TIP-Sheet from the ESOL website and keep constant record of your ESOL assignments (http://education.ucf.edu/esol).

Evidence must remain in the appropriate portfolio sections until the final portfolio check is completed by the college/university coordinator toward the end of Internship. The security and maintenance of the TESOL Portfolio and TIP sheet are the student’s responsibility.

16. How many assignments should be included for each ESOL Performance Standard?

There is no set number of assignments that should be included per ESOL Performance Standard. However, it is highly recommended that at least two assignments be included per standard since it is difficult, if not impossible, to indicate mastery of a standard with only one assignment. Remember, the same assignment—if it indeed relates to several different standards – can be used to address more than one ESOL Performance Standard.

17. When should the TESOL Portfolio be completed?

Prior to Internship, the faculty advisor will check that there is evidence of progress in advisees’ TESOL Portfolios. Likewise, students should be keeping their faculty advisor aware of the progress being made in developing this portfolio.

Most, if not all, of the TESOL Portfolio should be completed prior to Internship. Waitinguntil the last minute to begin the portfolio could seriously jeopardize satisfactorycompletion of Internship, and consequently, graduation. At the beginning and midpoint of Internship, the college/university coordinator will check the TIP sheet for progress/completion. Any standards that have not yet been addressed should be addressed during the remainder of Internship through carefully planned activities specifically focusing on the standards in which proficiency has not yet been demonstrated.

The portfolio must be completed by the end of Internship. The college/university coordinator will check for its completion and sign the final section of the ESOL Performance Profile signature pages where it is noted that the TESOL Portfolio has been completed. The profile, along with the final Student Teacher Competency Profile Summary, will be submitted by the college/university coordinator to the Office of Clinical Experiences.

18. What happens to the TIP sheet and TESOL Portfolio?

The TIP sheet and TESOL Portfolio will remain with the student. Students should keep their portfolio in the event they are ever asked to provide it as evidence of their ESOL training.

19. How does the ESOL Endorsement Infusion Model work regarding the internships?

For Internship, all Exceptional Education majors must be placed with an ESOL-endorsed teacher or a teacher currently working on his/her endorsement. If such a placement is not possible, then at least two weeks of the student’s Internship must be with an ESOLendorsed teacher and ESOL students. Provisions must be made for an ESOL experience within Internship.

20. What is the ESOL Performance Profile?

The ESOL Performance Profile documents the infusion of the 25 ESOL Performance Standards into the field experience/internship component of the teacher preparation program for majors in Exceptional Education. Students in these program areas must satisfactorily complete multiple weeks of planning, implementing, and assessing instruction for one or more ESOL students, supervised by ESOL qualified personnel.

If a course includes a field experience component in which Exceptional Education majors work with ESOL students, this activity can be documented on the ESOL Performance Profile. The students will need to be evaluated by an ESOL-qualified person (criteria are on the first page of the ESOL Performance Profile). This document is a powerful verification of our students' training in ESOL strategies and their ability to address the needs of these students.

If students participate in a field experience (other than Internship II) in which they interact with ESOL students, it is the students’ responsibility to arrange for an ESOL-qualified person (criteria are listed on the first page of the ESOL Performance Profile) to observe and evaluate their ability to successfully interact with ESOL students. The ESOL Performance Profile will follow the students through their teacher preparation program. Its security and maintenance are the students' responsibility.

21. What happens to the ESOL Performance Profile at the end of Internship?

During Internship, the intern is observed and evaluated by the college/university coordinator, who will record the evaluation of the intern on the ESOL Performance Profile. At the end of Internship, the college/university coordinator and the intern sign the final section of the ESOL Performance Profile signature pages where it is noted that the student has completed the ESOL Performance Profile requirements and the TESOL Portfolio.

This profile, along with the final Student Teacher Competency Profile Summary, is then submitted by the college/university coordinator to the Office of Clinical Experiences. Students should place a copy of their ESOL Performance Profile in their TESOL Portfolio. The TIP sheet, the TESOL Portfolio, and the ESOL Performance Profile together represent fulfillment of the 300 hours of ESOL training required by the Consent Decree.

22. How does the Registrar’s Office (where I get a copy of my official transcript) know that I have met all of the requirements to qualify for the ESOL Endorsement?

After the Office of Clinical Experience receives the ESOL Performance Profile, they notify the Office of Student Services of the student’s completion of the ESOL Endorsement requirements. If the student has satisfactorily completed the requirements, his/her audit is hand-stamped by the Office of Student Services, who then hand delivers the audit to the Registrar’s Office.

23. How do I obtain the ESOL Endorsement on my teaching certificate?

The “Application for Florida Educator’s Certificate” may be obtained from the Office of Student Services. The student will need to complete two separate application forms. The student will complete one application form for Academic Coverage (Elementary Education, for example) certification and another application form for Academic Endorsement (English to Speakers of Other Languages/ESOL). A separate fee will have to be paid with each application.

24. I understand that there is a TESOL Website for students. How is it accessed and what does it contain?

Everything you could possibly want to know about ESOL is now available on an open access website: http://education.ucf.edu/esol

25. Who is the UCF College of Education ESOL Coordinator?

The UCF College of Education ESOL Coordinator is Dr. Joyce Nutta, jnutta@mail.ucf.edu, EDU 122N, (407) 823-4341

26. I understand that I should take TSL 5085 during the first semester I am accepted in the College of Education. What happens if all sections of TSL 5085 are closed? Can I get an override?

Students who are unable to enroll in TSL 5085 should contact the Program Administrative Liaison for secondary programs (jheiner@mail.ucf.edu) to be placed on a waiting list (students should not e-mail the course instructor). Whenever an opening becomes available, the Program Administrative Liaison will e-mail the students on the waiting list to inform them which section she can put them in. If they accept that class, she will enroll them. If they refuse the section that she can put them in, they will go back on the waiting list.

Students' e-mail messages to Janet should include:

Subject: TSL 5085 Override Request Semester/Year--Section(s)______ (students may list multiple sections in order of preference if they all fit their schedules)

In the body of the message, include:

  1. Student name;
  2. Student #;
  3. Degree Program (e.g., Bachelor's in Elementary
  4. Education);
  5. What semester the student was accepted into the College of Education;
  6. Reason for override request (e.g., attempting to take the course during the first semester in the program, as required by the course sequence, etc.);
  7. A phone number where the student can be reached if necessary

Requests for overrides for TSL 6250 should be directed to the Coordinator of that course at flfacult@mail.ucf.edu. The MA TESOL Program does not grant overrides for a closed course section of TSL 6250 if any other sections of the course are open.

As the Subject line of your emailed override request, students should type:

Override Request Semester/Year—TSL6250

The body of the message should include the following information:

  1. Student name;
  2. Student #;
  3. Requested section(s) (students may list multiple sections in order of preference if they all fit their schedules)
  4. Degree Program (i.e., Master's in Elementary Education);
  5. What semester the student was accepted into the College of Education;
  6. Reason for override request (e.g., attempting to take the course during the first semester in the program, as required by the course sequence, etc.);
  7. A phone number where the student can be reached if necessary
 

Portfolio 

The TESOL Portfolio is a student-prepared portfolio that documents the infusion of the 25 ESOL performance standards into the UCF teacher certification program. This portfolio is prepared by students enrolled in the Exceptional Education M.A. program. There is a complete listing of the possible assignments/products that can be included as evidence in the TESOL Portfolio in the Sample TIP Sheet included in this handbook.

Introduction of Portfolio

The TESOL Portfolio is introduced in TSL 5085 (previously numbered TSL 5373 and TSL 5528). This course should be taken during the student’s first semester in the master’s program since it explains the infusion model requirements and establishes the documentation system (TESOL portfolio) for the 25 ESOL Performance Standards. If a student is unable to enroll in TSL 5085 during the first semester, it is thus imperative that Masters of Arts majors in Exceptional Education who are not currently ESOL endorsed take TSL 5085 as early as possible in their teacher education program. Waiting until the last minute to take TSL 5085 and to begin compiling the TESOL Portfolio could seriously jeopardize satisfactory completion of Internship and consequently, graduation.

Compilation of Portfolio

Students should compile their evidence into a TESOL Portfolio, which is to be organized according to the courses in the student’s program, including Internship. Each of the infused courses is to include opportunities to demonstrate proficiency in the ESOL performance standards assigned to that course. The specific ESOL performance standards addressed by the course are to be listed in the course syllabus.

Students will be responsible for organizing the pieces of evidence generated in each ESOL infused and ESOL stand-alone course to demonstrate their proficiency in the 25 ESOL performance standards. Instructor feedback must be evident on the piece of evidence. This feedback could be a grade, a comment, or even a checkmark. As students receive evaluated ESOL assignments in their courses, they should place them in the appropriate section of the TESOL Portfolio.

In order to cross-reference the 25 ESOL performance standards, it is highly recommended that students write across the top of the assignment the ESOL performance standard(s) being addressed, as specified in the course syllabus. Depending on how the instructor designed an assignment, the same piece of evidence may be used to address more than one ESOL performance standard.

Portfolio Assignments

The number of assignments to be included for each ESOL-infused course is dictated by the number of ESOL-related assignments required by the specific course. Ideally, each ESOL infused course should require at least two ESOL-related assignments for inclusion in the TESOL Portfolio.

 

Graduate Research

UCF has three fundamental responsibilities with regard to graduate student research. They are to (1) support an academic environment that stimulates the spirit of inquiry, (2) develop the intellectual property stemming from research, and (3) disseminate the intellectual property to the general public. Students are responsible for being informed of rules, regulations and policies pertaining to research. Below are some general policies and resources.

Research Policies and Ethics Information: UCF's Office of Research & Commercialization ensures the UCF community complies with local, state and federal regulations that relate to research. For polices including required Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval when conducting research involving human subjects (e.g. surveys), animal research, conflict of interest and general responsible conduct of research, please see their website: www.research.ucf.edu > Compliance.

UCF’s Patent and Invention Policy: In most cases, UCF owns the intellectual property developed using university resources. The graduate student as inventor will according to this policy share in the proceeds of the invention. Please see the current UCF Graduate Catalog for details: www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu > Policies > General Graduate Policies.

 

Financial Support

Financial Support

Graduate students may receive financial assistance through fellowships, assistantships, tuition support, or loans. For more information, see Financing Grad School, which describes the types of financial assistance available at UCF and provides general guidance in planning your graduate finances. The Financial Information section of the Graduate Catalog is another key resource.

Key points about financial support:

  • If you're interested in financial assistance, you're strongly encouraged to apply for admission early. A complete application for admission, including all supporting documents, must be received by the priority date listed for your program under "Admissions."

    b. You must be admitted to a graduate program before the university can consider awarding financial assistance to you.

  • If you want to be considered for loans and other need-based financial assistance, review the UCF Student Financial Assistance website at http://finaid.ucf.edu and complete the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) form, which is available online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Apply early and allow up to six weeks for the FAFSA form to be processed.

  • UCF Graduate Studies awards university graduate fellowships, with most decisions based on nominations from the colleges and programs. All admitted graduate students are automatically considered in this nomination process. To be eligible for a fellowship, students must be accepted as a graduate student in a degree program and be enrolled full-time. To receive need-based fellowship awards, the student must have demonstrated need as determined by FAFSA. Merit fellowship awards are not affected by FAFSA determination of need.

  • Please note that select fellowships do require students to fill out a fellowship application (either a university fellowship application, an external fellowship application, or a college or school fellowship application).

  • For information on assistantships (including teaching, research, and general graduate assistantships) or tuition support, contact the graduate program director of your major.

 

Graduate Student Associations

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is UCF's graduate organization committed to enrich graduate students' personal, educational and professional experience. To learn more or get involved, please visit www.gsa.ucf.edu. For individual department or graduate program organizations, please see program advisor.
 

Professional Development

Funded Projects

The College of Education partners with various organizations to provide students access to the following:

Project Tuition Support - http://education.ucf.edu/exed/funded_project.cfm

Research and Service - http://education.ucf.edu/exed/funded_research.cfm

Instructor Training and Development

The Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning (FCTL) promotes excellence in all levels of teaching at the University of Central Florida. They offer several programs for the professional development of Graduate Teaching Assistants at UCF.

  • GTA Training (mandatory for employment as a GTA)
    This training provides information and resources for students who will be instructors in a two-day workshop. The seminars cover a variety of topics, including course development, learning theories, lecturing, and academic freedom. Those interested in additional training can also attend an optional training session that normally follows the mandatory training.

  • Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Program
    This certificate program (12-weeks) consists of group and individualized instruction by Faculty Center staff and experienced UCF professors. Textbooks and materials are provided.

For more information: www.fctl.ucf.edu > Events > GTA Programs or call 407-823-3544.

Graduate Research Forum

The Graduate Research Forum will feature poster displays representing UCF’s diverse colleges and disciplines. It is an opportunity for students to showcase their research and creative projects and to receive valuable feedback from faculty judges. Awards for best poster presentation in each category will be given and all participants will receive recognition.

The College of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Student Association invite all UCF students, community, and employers to attend the Graduate Research Forum. For more information, contact researchweek@mail.ucf.edu.

Graduate Excellence Awards

Each year, the College of Graduate Studies offers graduate students who strive for academic and professional excellence the opportunity to be recognized for their work. The award categories include the following:

Award for Excellence by a Graduate Teaching Assistant – This award is for students who provide teaching support and assistance under the direction of a lead teacher. This award focuses on the extent and quality of the assistance provided by the student to the lead instructor and the students in the class. (Not intended for students who are instructor of record)

Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Teaching – This award is for students who serve as instructors of record and have independent classroom responsibilities. The focus of this award is on the quality of the student’s teaching and the academic contributions of those activities.

Award for the Outstanding Master’s Thesis – It recognizes graduate students for excellence in the master's thesis. The focus of this award is on the quality and contribution of the student's thesis research. Excellence of the master's thesis may be demonstrated by evidence such as, but not limited to: publications in refereed journals, awards and recognitions from professional organizations, and praise from faculty members and other colleagues in the field. The university award will be forwarded to a national-level competition sponsored by the Council of Southern Graduate Schools (CSGS) when the thesis discipline corresponds to the annual submission request.

Innovative Thesis or Dissertation Award - The Award recognizes cutting-edge use of technology in theses and dissertations. The focus of this award is on the technical innovation of the student's thesis or dissertation through the application of renderings, photos, data sets, software code and other multimedia objects.

For the nomination process and eligibility criteria, see the College of Graduate Studies website www.graduate.ucf.edu/GradAwards.

Other

Students should take opportunities to present a poster or a topic of research at a conference. To obtain financial support to present at a conference (other than through your program) or to engage in comparable creative activity at a professional meeting, visit the Graduate Travel Fellowship section at www.graduate.ucf.edu.

For information about the Council of Southern Graduate Schools (CSGS) thesis and dissertation awards, see their website: www.csgs.org > Awards.

For grant-proposal writing resources: http://uwc.ucf.edu/gradwriting.php.

 

Job Search

UCF’s Career Services department offers a wide range of programs and services designed to assist graduate students. These services include evaluation and exploration of career goals, preparation for the job search and job search resources. To learn more, visit their website at www.career.ucf.edu.

For specific services or resources provided by the academic program, please contact the graduate program director or academic advisor.

 

Forms

  • College of Graduate Studies Forms
    A listing of forms and files for the College of Graduate Studies.
  • Graduate Petition Form
    When unusual situations arise, petitions for exceptions to policy may be requested by the student. Depending on the type of appeal, the student should contact his/her program adviser to begin the petition process.
  • Transfer Request Form
    In order for transfer courses to be requested for use in a UCF degree, the official transcripts from the institution where the courses were taken must be sent to UCF’s College of Graduate Studies. In addition to the form, supporting documentation from the program/college must be submitted giving approval for courses to be transferred and where credit should be applied in the program of study.
  • Traveling Scholar Form
    Required form of graduate students who would like to take advantage of resources available on another campus, but not available at UCF; for example, special course offerings, research opportunities, unique laboratories and library collections.
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Office Hours

Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Contact Information

Campus Address
Millican Hall, 230
4000 Central Florida Blvd.
Orlando, FL 32816
Phone: 407-823-2766 Fax: 407-823-6442

Mailing Address
P.O. Box 160112, Orlando, FL 32816-0112

The University of Central Florida is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
(1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097; Telephone number 404-679-4501) to award degrees at the associate, baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral levels.

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