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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2016-2017

Last Updated 2016-02-24
Emerging Media MFA

Studio Art and the Computer



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Introduction

The Studio Art and the Computer track of the MFA in Emerging Media, provides students an opportunity to inform and enhance their artistic practice using 21st Century electronic media. This emphasis on electronic media is pliable enough to encompass the many ways in which technology intersects with contemporary art and design.

Students in the program are invited to combine their backgrounds in traditional art or computer-related disciplines within a conceptually driven, interdisciplinary environment. Courses provide exposure to time-based media, performance art, video art, sound works, kinetic sculpture, computer-based art, and art using the Internet in order to understand how these forms are driving 21st century artistic practice and informing our understanding of contemporary cultural identities

Total Credit Hours Required

66 credit hours minimum beyond the bachelor's degree.

Curriculum

The Studio Art and the Computer MFA track is composed of a minimum of 66 credit hours, to be acquired in three years (six full-time semesters excluding summers). Degree credit is obtained in theory courses, studio art courses, electives, and supervised research. All courses must be approved by the Graduate Program Director. The thesis consists of a body of artistic work accompanied by electronic (Internet) documentation and a culminating exhibition.

Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 or better GPA in all course work to complete the program. Continuation in the MFA program requires a positive annual evaluation by the Program Director of the School of Visual Arts and Design and by the Graduate Committee of the School of Visual Arts and Design.

Required Courses—51 Credit Hours

  • ART 5280 Serial Content (3 credit hours)
  • ART 5284 Design Theory and Methods (3 credit hours)
  • ART 5696 Art, Design and Human Interactions (3 credit hours)
  • ART 5698 Concourse I (3 credit hours)
  • ARH 5897 Advanced Seminar in Art History (3 credit hours)
  • ART 5910 Studio Concentration I (3 credit hours; should be taken twice for a total of 6 credit hours)
  • ART 5941 Graduate Practicum I (1 credit hour)
  • ART 6683C Time Arts (3 credit hours)
  • ART 6687 Research Concentration I (3 credit hours)
  • ART 6689 Research Concentration II (3 credit hours)
  • ART 6699 Concourse II (3 credit hours)
  • ART 6911 Studio Concentration II (3 credit hours; should be taken twice for a total of 6 credit hours)
  • ART 6930 Graduate Seminar (1 credit hour; taken four times)
  • ART 6942 Graduate Practicum II (1 credit hour)
  • DIG 5487 Principles of Visual Language (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6136 Design for New Media (3 credit hours)

Elective Courses—9 Credit Hours

Students should choose from graduate level courses within the School of Visual Arts & Design that are not already required for their program. These courses included those with the following prefixes: ARH, ART, DIG and FIL. If approved by the Graduate Program Director, there are many graduate-level courses in the College of Arts and Humanities that can be used as electives in addition to other graduate courses. These courses must be selected so as to ensure that at least one-half of the courses in the student’s plan of study are taken at the 6000 level. Normally, at least half of the selected electives should be taken within the School of Visual Arts and Design.

A listing of courses offered can be found in the drop-down Catalog Menu at the top of the page under "Courses."

  • Electives (9 credit hours)

Thesis—6 Credit Hours

  • ART 6971 Thesis (6 credit hours)

The thesis consists of a body of artistic work accompanied by electronic (Internet) documentation and a culminating exhibition.

The final oral review before the supervisory thesis committee occurs at the end of the sixth semester. At the same time, the graduate student presents a thesis exhibition of selected works from the cumulative body of works produced during his/her three years of residency. In addition, the thesis requires an artist’s statement and documentation. The thesis will contain research intentions, results, and the body of the creative works produced. Students are required to submit an electronic version of the thesis to the UCF College of Graduate Studies. After approval by the UCF College of Graduate Studies, the UCF Library will add it to its archives and make the electronic version of the thesis accessible on the web. The required thesis is the independent learning experience in the degree program.

Course Schedule

The Emerging Media MFA is a full-time 3-year cohort program that requires students to abide by the following course sequence. Students must remain with their cohort in order to remain in good academic standing and graduate.

YEAR 1

Fall—13 Credit Hours
  • ARH 5897 Advanced Seminar in Art History (3 credit hours)
  • ART 5284 Design Theory and Methods (3 credit hours)
  • ART 5910 Studio Concentration I (3 credit hours)
  • ART 5941 Graduate Practicum I (1 credit hour)
  • DIG 5487 Principles of Visual Language (3 credit hours)
Spring—13 Credit Hours
  • ART 5280 Serial Content (3 credit hours)
  • ART 5910 Studio Concentration I (3 credit hours)
  • ART 6942 Graduate Practicum II (1 credit hour)
  • DIG 6136 Design for New Media (3 credit hours)
  • ART, DIG or FIL Elective (3 credit hours)

YEAR 2

Fall—10 Credit Hours
  • ART 5696 Art, Design and Human Interactions (3 credit hours)
  • ART 6683C Time Arts (3 credit hours)
  • ART 6911 Studio Concentration II (3 credit hours)
  • ART 6930 Graduate Seminar (1 credit hour)
Spring—10 Credit Hours
  • ART 6911 Studio Concentration II (3 credit hours)
  • ART 6930 Graduate Seminar (1 credit hour)
  • ART, DIG or FIL Elective (3 credit hours)
  • ART, DIG or FIL Elective (3 credit hours)

YEAR 3

Fall—10 Credit Hours
  • ART 5698 Concourse I (3 credit hours)
  • ART 6687 Research Concentration I (3 credit hours)
  • ART 6930 Graduate Seminar (1 credit hour)
  • ART 6971 Thesis (3 credit hours)
Spring—10 Credit Hours
  • ART 6689 Research Concentration II (3 credit hours)
  • ART 6699 Concourse II (3 credit hours)
  • ART 6930 Graduate Seminar (1 credit hour)
  • ART 6971 Thesis (3 credit hours)

Equipment Fee

Students in the Emerging Media MFA program pay a $90 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled.


Timeline for Completion

The Studio Art and the Computer MFA track is composed of a minimum of 66 credit hours, to be acquired in three years (six full-time semesters excluding summers). Degree credit is obtained in theory courses, studio art courses, electives, and supervised research. All courses must be approved by the Graduate Program Director. The thesis consists of a body of artistic work accompanied by electronic (Internet) documentation and a culminating exhibition.Students progress through the program by taking required classes in particular semesters. Students must remain with their cohort in order to remain in good academic standing and graduate.

Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 or better GPA in all course work to complete the program. Continuation in the MFA program requires a positive annual evaluation by the Program Director of the School of Visual Arts and Design and by the Graduate Committee of the School of Visual Arts and Design.

Degree Plan of Study

A student’s degree plan of study is the collection of courses that the student will take to earn the degree. In all cases, a student simply follows the guidelines given in the next section, Course Schedule, to select his or her course; the specific course of study is thus jointly formulated by the student and the Program Coordinator before completion of the first 9 hours of the program. Flexibility in course choices occurs only in Elective Courses. The student may make changes to the plan of study at any time via elective courses chosen with the approval of the Program Coordinator. However, the plan of study cannot be changed solely due to the poor academic performance of the student.

Advising/Mentoring

You will typically receive guidance from your Academic Advisor, your semester mentor(s), and your Thesis Chair.

Academic Advisor: The Program Coordinator will be your primary academic advisor and will provide guidance on overall academic requirements, and program and university policies and procedures. Be sure to consult with her regularly--at least once per semester--to discuss your academic progress.

All incoming Emerging Media MFA students will be assigned a graduate faculty mentor by the program coordinator. The mentor will meet with and advise the student until his Thesis Committee is formed.

Graduation

To graduate, you must complete an Online Intent to Graduate Form during the first week of your last term. You can find this form on myUCF in the Student Center. If you do not succeed at graduating in the indicated semester, you must complete another form at the beginning of your new semester of graduation. You must bring an unusual circumstance like delayed graduation to the attention of the Program Coordinator as soon as possible.

Please keep in mind, you must be registered in your graduating semester. If you have completed all the hours required in your degree plan, including thesis and all thesis requirements, you may register IDS 6999: Graduation Requirement

Commencement information is available online at www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/Graduation_and_Commencement/.

Examination Requirements

Examinations occur in the MFA in the SA&C degree program in the form of critiques. Two critiques take place each semester, one at mid-term and another at the end of the semester. All students are required to attend these sessions. Dates and times will be released each term.

These critiques are structured in the following manner: candidates exhibit their progress in research in a predetermined place and time within the graduate studios. Candidates from all levels of the program take part in these presentations and the whole experience is normally accomplished over a two-day period. Graduate faculty and other degree candidates will attend the presentations and discussions will take place among all in attendance. Ultimately, the graduate faculty through this critique process arrives at candidate’s semester grades.

Thesis Requirements

The thesis consists of a body of artistic work accompanied by electronic (Internet) documentation and a culminating exhibition. The final oral review before the supervisory thesis committee occurs at the end of the sixth semester (see Thesis and Oral Defense of Thesis). At the same time, the graduate student presents a thesis exhibition of selected works from the cumulative body of works produced during his/her three years of residency. In addition, the thesis requires an artist's statement and documentation. The thesis will contain research intentions, results, and the body of the creative works produced. Students are required to submit an electronic version of the thesis to UCF College of Graduate Studies. After approval by UCF College of Graduate Studies, the UCF Library will add it to its archives and make the electronic version of the thesis accessible online.

University Thesis Requirements

The College of Graduate Studies Thesis and Dissertation page contains information on the university’s requirements for thesis formatting, format review, defenses, final submission, and more. A step-by-step completion guide is also available at Completing Your Thesis or Dissertation.

All university deadlines are listed in the Academic Calendar. Your program or college may have other earlier deadlines; please check with your program and college staff for additional deadlines.

The following requirements must be met by thesis students in their final term:

  • Submit a properly formatted file for initial format review by the format review deadline
  • Submit the Thesis and Dissertation Release Option form well before the defense
  • Defend by the defense deadline
  • Receive format approval (if not granted upon initial review)
  • Submit signed approval form by final submission deadline
  • Submit final thesis document by final submission deadline

Students must format their thesis according to the standards outlined at Formatting the ETD. Formatting questions or issues can be submitted to the Format Help page in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. Format reviews and final submission must be completed in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. The Thesis Approval Form is also available in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site.

The College of Graduate Studies offers several thesis and dissertation Workshops each term. Students are highly encouraged to attend these workshops early in the thesis process to fully understand the above policies and procedures.

The College of Graduate Studies thesis and dissertation office is best reached by email at editor@ucf.edu.

Thesis Chair and Committee

In semesters five and six of the program, the candidate is enrolled in ART 6971 Thesis and will choose a Thesis Chair and at least two additional Thesis Committee members from among the graduate faculty that are approved by Graduate Studies for the MFA in Emerging Media, Studio Art & the Computer (see www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu/GradFaculty). Your Thesis Chair serves as your mentor, providing guidance on your research, professional opportunities, and other areas of academic interest. Your committee members and other graduate faculty in the department will offer additional useful input and advice. You are encouraged to confer with your faculty often as you progress towards your degree—you should do so at least once weekly. At the beginning of both semesters five and six, you must complete the CAH Graduate Registration Form which includes a complete accounting of your assignments and expectations for each semester in ART 6971 Thesis. Also at the beginning of semesters five and six, you must complete the CAH Thesis Committee Approval Form which defines who your Thesis Chair and Committee members are.

As the UCF Graduate Catalog makes clear (www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu > Policies > General Graduate Policies > Student’s Responsibility), you are responsible for staying informed of all rules, regulations, and procedures required for graduate studies. Graduate program regulations will not be waived nor exceptions granted because students plead ignorance of the regulations or claim failure of the adviser to keep them informed. Please be certain to inform the department whenever your contact information changes, and be sure to read the email and other messages we send you. The Graduate Catalog is the university’s official record of graduate policies, and this Graduate Handbook must be consistent with university policy. In any case where the two documents appear to disagree, the Graduate Catalog is the final authority.

Thesis and Oral Defense of Thesis

The Oral Defense of the MFA student’s thesis should occur during the period of their final exhibition and should be approximately one hour long. About twenty minutes of the allotted time should be devoted to a presentation by the degree candidate that outlines the subject of their thesis proposal, a technical explanation of the principal medium chosen to research the subject, and a brief statement explaining why they believe their research is valid, and meaningful. NASAD guidelines state clearly that the work of the graduate should be the equal of professionals in their chosen field. Following the candidate’s presentation their research will be challenged in open debate by professionals who will ask questions that call on you to discuss the theoretical, methodological, and substantive aspects of your research.

The graduate committee should assess the candidates’ knowledge of their research subject, their knowledge of current research activity in their chosen field, and their response to the questions posed by the practicing professionals during the sixty-minute (maximum) question and answer period.

The committee will use the assessment of the Oral Defense of Thesis as part of the overall review of the thesis. This assessment should include (but is not limited to) the following topics:

  1. Clear presentation and explanation of thesis content
    Note: content does not necessarily mean subject matter, though subject matter is a part of content.
  2. Concise and clear explanation of research process that explains choice of research medium and the effectiveness of that choice in subsequent work leading to the final thesis.
  3. Clarity of verbal expression when addressing questions by professionals from the candidates chosen discipline.
  4. Verbal evidence that the candidate understands the major work currently being produced in their chosen field and is capable of relating their own work to the major research of others in the discipline.
  5. The ability to present a convincing argument that the continuation of the candidates research might lead to innovative and significant work in their chosen discipline.

Project/Report Requirements

Criteria for Internship

The basic criteria for designation as an internship course at UCF includes student experiential learning which:

  • relates directly to a student’s academic major or major-related career goal
  • occurs in business, industry, non-profit, educational, or governmental agencies
  • involves collaboration between campus and business community that aims to increase students‘ work, personal, and academic competencies
  • provides appropriate supervision both on site through a professional with related training and skills and through guidance from faculty
  • involves structure for learning, including application of classroom content and assignments for reflection that would result in the development of student competencies and go beyond simple assignment of a student completing a set number of hours experience in a setting outside the academic classroom
  • involves a minimum of 45 hours per credit per semester at the participating work site to provide real-world experience and to promote interaction between students and professionals toward the development of professional attitudes and behavior (more hours may be required; fewer hours may be justified by the concentration of the experience or the learning objectives)

All Directed Research, Independent Study and Internship must be accompanied by a syllabus with expectations and due dates. This document serves as a contract between the instructor of record and the student for the grade is determined.

Graduate Research

UCF has three fundamental responsibilities with regard to graduate student research. They are to (1) support an academic environment that stimulates the spirit of inquiry, (2) develop the intellectual property stemming from research, and (3) disseminate the intellectual property to the general public. Students are responsible for being informed of rules, regulations and policies pertaining to research. Below are some general policies and resources.

Research Policies and Ethics Information: UCF's Office of Research & Commercialization ensures the UCF community complies with local, state and federal regulations that relate to research. For polices including required Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval when conducting research involving human subjects (e.g. surveys), animal research, conflict of interest and general responsible conduct of research, please see their website: www.research.ucf.edu/ > Compliance.

UCF’s Patent and Invention Policy: In most cases, UCF owns the intellectual property developed using university resources. The graduate student as inventor will according to this policy share in the proceeds of the invention. Please see the current UCF Graduate Catalog for details: www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu/. 

Financial Support

Fellowships and Assistantships

Overview

MFA in Emerging Media, Studio Art and the Computer students are eligible for three kinds of support:

Need-based assistance: The university provides need-based scholarships funded by the federal government. These are based on financial need as determined by the FAFSA form and are awarded in the middle of April. We encourage all students to complete a FAFSA application form online at www.fafsa.ed.gov.

Fellowships: These competitive, merit-based awards are usually reserved for newly admitted students. These awards pay a stipend and/or provide a tuition waiver. Fellows are nominated by the Art Department in the first week of March. To be eligible, students must have their entire application on file by January 15.

Assistantships: These merit-based awards may be applied for at any point in the MFA in Emerging Media, SA&C degree program. Different assistantships have different eligibility criteria. For example, graduate teaching assistantships may only be awarded to students who have completed 18 hours of graduate coursework in Art and who have completed all mandatory university training.

Different assistantships also have different requirements. Some of these requirements include in-depth professional development activities. Consult with the Program Coordinator for more information on which assistantships are available and what they require.

You ordinarily do not need to complete a special application for assistantships or fellowships. However, you are required to let the Program Coordinator know of your interest. Financial support is offered only to full-time degree-seeking students.

Assistantship Opportunities

Graduate students often receive assistantships in their departments or other university offices while pursuing graduate studies. Graduate assistants may teach, conduct research, or perform other tasks that contribute to the student's professional development. Graduate students may become Graduate Teaching Associates, Assistants, or Graders (GTAs), Graduate Research Associates or Assistants (GRAs), or Graduate Assistants (GAs). For eligibility, students must be accepted as a graduate student in a degree program and be enrolled full-time. Due to the evolving nature of the assistantship program, please consult the Graduate Studies website for the most current information: funding.graduate.ucf.edu/.

Teaching Assistantship Resources

If you received a graduate teaching assistantship, you may be assigned teaching responsibilities as part of your stipend. The following information will be useful in fulfilling your teaching duties:

a) Instructor Training and Development

The Faculty Center for Teaching & Learning (FCTL) promotes excellence in all levels of teaching at the University of Central Florida. To that end, it offers several programs for the professional development of Graduate Teaching Assistants at UCF.

b) GTA Training (mandatory for employment as a GTA)

This two-day workshop provides information and resources for students who will be instructors. The seminars cover a variety of topics, including course development, learning theories, lecturing, and academic freedom. Those interested in additional training can also attend an optional training session that normally follows the mandatory training.

c) Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Program

This certificate program (12-weeks) consists of group and individualized instruction by Faculty Center staff and experienced UCF professors. Textbooks and materials are provided.  

For more information about GTA Training, see fctl.ucf.edu > Events > GTA Programs.

Graduate Student Associations

College Art Association (CAA)

CAA includes among its members those who by vocation or avocation are concerned about and/or committed to the practice of art, teaching, and research of and about the visual arts and humanities.  Visit the College Art Association website  for more information.

National Association of Schools of Art and Design

NASAD is an association of approximately 300 schools of art and design, primarily at the collegiate level, but also including postsecondary non-degree-granting schools for the visual arts disciplines.Visit the National Association of Schools of Art and Design website  for more information.

Council of Southern Graduate Schools

The Conference of Southern Graduate Schools is an organization of over 200 graduate schools in the following fifteen states of the southern region of the United States. The Conference's purpose is to consider topics relating to graduate study and research which are of mutual interest and concern to the member institutions.  For more information visit the Council of Southern Graduate Schools website.

Graduate Student Association (GSA) 

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is UCF's graduate organization committed to enrich graduate students' personal, educational and professional experience. To learn more or get involved, please visit www.gsa.ucf.edu. For individual department or graduate program organizations, please see program advisor.

Professional Development

Internships / Teaching Opportunities

As part of the MFA in Emerging Media, Studio Art & the Computer curriculum, you may have the opportunity to obtain experience as a teaching assistant, research assistant, or teacher-of-record for an undergraduate level art course. We recommend that you take advantage of these opportunities if you are interested in them and as they become available to you.

Pathways to Success Workshops

Coordinated by the College of Graduate Studies, the Pathways to Success program offers the following free development opportunities for graduate students including workshops in Academic Integrity, Graduate Grantsmanship, Graduate Teaching, Personal Development, Professional Development, and Research.  For more information and how to register, please visit www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/pathways/  

Travel Support for Research Presentations

While extra-curricular conference presentations and in particular, participation in juried art exhibitions outside UCF are not required for the MFA in Emerging Media, Studio Art and the Computer degree, such experiences are professionally important, and graduate students are encouraged to pursue them. Your faculty members will likely mention opportunities in your classes or you will receive email announcements about them. Not all of these opportunities require travel; some are held at UCF. For more information about how to pursue these opportunities, consult with a faculty member, a member of your thesis committee, or the Program Coordinator.

Funding is available to pay some expenses for graduate students who are speaking at a conference or undertaking comparable creative activity at a professional meeting. Contact the Student Government Association www.sga.ucf.edu at 407-823-5648 for more information.

The College of Graduate Studies offers a presentation fellowship that provides funding for master's, specialist, and doctoral students to deliver a research paper or comparable creative activity at a professional meeting or conference. More information can be found on the Graduate Studies Funding website: funding.graduate.ucf.edu/presentation/.

All graduate students who will travel to professional workshops and conferences should obtain an approved Travel Authorization Request (TAR) from the department, particularly if the travel occurs during the same semester as a Graduate Assistant/Graduate Research Assistant/Graduate Teaching Assistant contract.

Scholarly Publications

Scholarly publications are not required for the MFA in  Emerging Media, Studio Art and the Computer degree, but such publications may be professionally even for a studio artist. For more information about how to pursue these opportunities, consult with a faculty member, a member of your thesis committee, or the Program Coordinator or the Graduate Program Director for Art.

Departmental Awards Via College and University

The university provides several achievement awards:

Graduate Excellence Awards

Each year, students can submit a portfolio for nomination of College and University level awards of excellence. These are intended to showcase student excellence in academic achievement, teaching, research, leadership, and community service.

Award for Excellence by a Graduate Teaching Assistant - This award is intended for students who provide teaching support and assistance under the direction of a lead teacher. This award focuses on the extent and quality of the assistance provided by the student to the lead instructor and the students in the class. (This award is not intended for students who are teachers of record.)

Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Teaching - This award is for students who serve as teachers of record and have independent classroom responsibilities. The focus of this award is on the quality of the student's teaching and the academic contributions of those activities.

Award for the Outstanding Master's Thesis - This award recognizes graduate students for excellence in the master's thesis. The focus is on the quality and contribution of the student's thesis research. Excellence of the master's thesis may be demonstrated by evidence such as (but not limited to): publications in refereed or peer reviewed journals, the candidates juried exhibitions and awards record, recognitions and awards from professional organizations, and praise from faculty members and other colleagues in the field. The university award will be forwarded to a national-level competition sponsored by the Council of Southern Graduate Schools (CSGS) when the thesis discipline corresponds to the annual submission request.

For more information about these awards, please see the College of Graduate Studies administrative website: www.graduate.ucf.edu/GradAwards.

For more information about the Council of Southern Graduate Schools (CSGS) thesis and dissertation awards, please see their website: www.csgs.org > Awards.

Job Search

Career Services and Experiential Learning

Graduate career development issues are unique and include evaluating academic and non-academic career choices, discussing graduate school effect on career choices, as well as learning, evaluating, and refining networking and interviewing skills. Whatever your needs, the offices of Career Services and Experiential Learning offer services and resources to aid in the career exploration and job search of Master and Doctoral students in every academic discipline. (See www.career.ucf.edu)

Forms

Useful Links