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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2016-2017

Program Info

Last Updated 2012-07-12

Physics MS



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Introduction

The Master of Science in Physics degree is flexibly designed to prepare students for the widest possible range of industrial careers or further study at the doctoral level, according to student interests and goals. With a 15-credit common core, the student’s other 15 remaining required credit hours are planned in consultation with an academic adviser. These may include courses from other departments. Courses must be selected so that at least one-half of the required courses are taken at the 6000 level. Additionally, 3 hours of directed research or 6 thesis hours are required. Students pursuing a non-thesis master’s degree must take at least one Directed Research course as part of their elective work. In this course students will work on a research project under the supervision of a faculty member and present a final report.

Satisfactory Academic Performance

Satisfactory performance involves maintaining the standards of academic progress and professional integrity expected in a particular discipline or program. Failure to maintain these standards may result in termination of the student from the program.

A program GPA below 3.00 at the end of any semester will result in a student being placed on “academic probationary” status. In this status, a student is not eligible for tuition waiver support or employment as graduate assistant (teaching or research). The students are given the next nine hours of their program coursework to improve their GPA to 3.00 or better. Further, exceeding six credit hours of C or lower grades or a program GPA of 2.00 or lower will result in removal from the program.

4000-level coursework is acceptable in a graduate plan of study if taken while a graduate student, but is limited to six credit hours and the grade has to be that of a B- or higher. An approved 4000-level course is not counted toward completion of the program requirement, but it is calculated in the graduate GPA.

Curriculum

The Physics MS program requires a minimum of 30 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree, and offers students a thesis and nonthesis option. All students take 12 credit hours of core courses, and then the remaining 18 credit hours consist of both electives and thesis or directed research according to the option chosen.

The Master of Science in Physics program is flexibly designed in order to prepare students for the widest possible range of industrial careers or for further study at the doctoral level. Courses must be selected so that at least one-half of the required courses are taken at the 6000 level.

Students pursuing a nonthesis master’s degree must take at least one directed research course as part of their elective work. In this course, students will work on a research project under the supervision of a faculty member and present a final report.

Required Courses—12 Credit Hours

  • PHY 5606 Quantum Mechanics I (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 5346 Electrodynamics I (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 5524 Statistical Physics (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 6246 Classical Mechanics (3 credit hours)

Elective Courses—18 Credit Hours

Both thesis and nonthesis students take electives in consultation with their advisers. Out of the 18 elective credit hours at least 12 credit hours of formal course work are required and not more than 6 credit hours of 5000-level elective courses are counted toward the degree. At least 6 credit hours of thesis or 3 credit hours of directed research for the nonthesis option are required. Otherwise, elective selection is intended to be very flexible in order to meet student needs and interests. Electives may be chosen following one of the suggested specializations below, or a different program of study may be followed with academic adviser approval.

Materials Physics Specialization

  • PHY 6624 Quantum Mechanics II (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 6347 Electrodynamics II (3 credit hours)
  • PHZ 6426 Condensed Matter Physics I (3 credit hours)
  • PHZ 6428 Condensed Matter Physics II (3 credit hours)
  • PHZ 5505 Plasma Physics (3 credit hours)
  • PHZ 5437 Nanoscale Surface in Physics (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 5933 Selected Topics in Biophysics of Macromolecules (3 credit hours)
  • PHZ 5425C Electron Solid Interactions (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 5140C Ion-Solid Interactions (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 5455 Modern X-ray Science (3 credit hours)
  • PHZ 6420 First Principles Computational Methods in Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 5933 Selected Topics in Biophysics of Macromolecules (3 credit hours)
  • PHZ 5432 Introduction to Soft Condensed Matter Physics (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 6938 Theory and Computation of Molecular Wave Functions (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 6938 Selected Topics in Scattering Theory (3 credit hours)
  • EEE 5356C Fabrications of Solid-State Devices (4 credit hours)
  • Other graduate courses from Optics, Materials Science, Physics, Optical Science and Engineering, Electrical Engineering or Industrial Chemistry.

Optical Physics Specialization

  • PHY 6624 Quantum Mechanics II (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 6347 Electrodynamics II (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 6938 Theory and Computation of Molecular Wave Functions (3 credit hours)
  • OSE 6111 Optical Wave Propagation (3 credit hours)
  • OSE 5115 Interference and Diffraction (3 credit hours)
  • OSE 6526C Laser Engineering Laboratory (3 credit hours)
  • OSE 6455C Photonics Laboratory (3 credit hours)
  • OSE 6347 Quantum Optics (3 credit hours)
  • OSE 5312 Fundamentals of Optical Science (3 credit hours)
  • Other graduate courses from Optics, Materials Science, Physics, Optical Science and Engineering, Electrical Engineering or Industrial Chemistry.

Space Physics Specialization

  • PHY 6624 Quantum Mechanics II (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 6347 Electrodynamics II (3 credit hours)
  • PHZ 5505 Plasma Physics (3 credit hours)
  • AST 5165 Planetary Atmospheres (3 credit hours)
  • EAS 5315 Rocket Propulsion (3 credit hours)
  • EAS 6405 Advanced Flight Dynamics (3 credit hours)
  • EAS 6507 Topics of Astrodynamics (3 credit hours)
  • OSE 5041 Introduction to Wave Optics (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5820 Image Processing (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 6823 Image Processing II (3 credit hours)
  • Other graduate courses from Optics, Materials Science, Physics, Optical Science and Engineering, Electrical Engineering or Industrial Chemistry.

Theory/Computational Physics Specialization

  • PHY 6624 Quantum Mechanics II (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 6347 Electrodynamics II (3 credit hours)
  • PHZ 6420 First Principles Computational Methods in Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 6938 Theory and Computation of Molecular Wave Functions (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 6938 Selected Topics in Scattering Theory (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 5650 Introduction to Quantum Computation (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 6667 Advanced Quantum Mechanics (3 credit hours)
  • PHZ 6426 Condensed Matter Physics I (3 credit hours)
  • PHZ 6428 Condensed Matter Physics II (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 6667 Quantum Field Theory I (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 7669 Quantum Field Theory II (3 credit hours)
  • PHZ 5505 Plasma Physics (3 credit hours)
  • OSE 6347 Quantum Optics (3 credit hours)
  • OSE 5312 Fundamentals of Optical Science (3 credit hours)
  • Other courses from Physics, Math, Optics, Materials Science, Engineering, Computer Science.

Thesis Option—6 Credit Hours

Students who choose the thesis option are required to conduct a program of original scientific research or some investigation involving a creative element and to submit a written thesis detailing these investigations. An oral defense and examination of the thesis is required.

  • PHY 6971 Thesis (6 credit hours)

Nonthesis Option—3 Credit Hours

Nonthesis students will take 15 credit hours of electives from the list of elective specializations shown above. In addition, they must take 3 credit hours of directed research as well as a written comprehensive exit examination. In the directed research course, students work on a research project under the supervision of a faculty member and are required to present a final report.

  • PHY 6918 Directed Research (3 credit hours)

Track Curriculum: Planetary Sciences



The Planetary Sciences track in the Physics MS program requires a minimum 33 hours of graduate course work as directed by the student’s supervisory committee. This must include at least 15 credit hours of required courses, 6 hours of thesis preparation with the remainder being elective courses and directed research chosen in consultation with the supervisory committee. At least half of the total credits must be at the 6000 level. No more than 6 hours of independent study may be credited toward the master's degree. The master's degree in Planetary Sciences includes a thesis and its defense. There is no nonthesis master's degree in the Planetary Sciences track.

Required Courses—15 Credit Hours

The core is designed to give students a broad foundation in the planetary sciences and a rapid training in the data analysis techniques that will be necessary for a successful research and publications. Students choose 5 out of the 6 core courses listed below: 

  • PHY 5524 Statistical Physics (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 6246 Classical Mechanics (3 credit hours)
  • PHZ 5156 Computational Physics (3 credit hours) or AST 5765C Advanced Astronomical Data Analysis (3 credit hours)
  • AST 5154 Advanced Planetary Geophysics (3 credit hours)
  • AST 5263 Advanced Observational Astronomy (3 credit hours)
  • AST 5165 Planetary Atmospheres (3 credit hours)

Elective Courses—12 Credit Hours

  • AST 6XXX Planetary Astronomy Seminar (3 credit hours)
  • AST 6112 Origins of Solar Systems (3 credit hours)
  • AST 5334 Extrasolar Planets and Brown Dwarfs (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 5937 Astrobiology (3 credit hours)

Other Electives

  • PHZ 5505 Plasma Physics (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 5346 Electrodynamics I (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 6347 Electrodynamics II (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 5606 Quantum Mechanics I (3 credit hours)
  • PHY 6624 Quantum Mechanics II (3 credit hours)
  • OSE 5041 Introduction to Wave Optics (3 credit hours)
  • EEL 5820 Image Processing (3 credit hours)
  • OSE 5312 Fundamentals of Optical Science (3 credit hours)

Thesis—6 Credit Hours

  • PHY 6971 Thesis (6 credit hours)

Supervisory Committee

Within the first half-semester of admission to the planetary sciences graduate track, each student must select, by mutual agreement, a faculty adviser and two other faculty members to serve on his or her Supervisory Committee. One of the faculty members who is not the adviser must be from an area in the department other than Planetary Sciences. UCF faculty and self-funded research scientists are eligible to serve on supervisory committees. Changes in the membership of a Supervisory Committee must be approved by the Planetary Sciences Graduate Committee. The adviser is expected to meet regularly with the student. The full committee shall meet with the student at least once per semester to review and make recommendations regarding the student's academic progress.

Master's Defense

The written thesis and oral defense is the final requirement for the master's degree. The thesis is a journal-level research paper. The oral defense is  two parts: (1) A public presentation of the research contained in the paper; and (2) private questioning on the detail of the presented research as well as the topics covered in the student’s preparation and course work. The written and oral components will be administrated by the student’s Supervisory Committee.


Timeline for Completion

Advising and Mentoring

All graduate students will be advised by the graduate coordinator and the program assistant upon entering the program. Full-time, regular faculty member of the Physics Department serve as the student's advisors for students with a research assistantship. He or she will help the student to devise a coursework plan besides offering research opportunities. For formal matters, such as course waivers, credit transfers, and petitions, the student must always consult the graduate coordinator. Students can request to change academic advisers at any time. Students with a teaching assistantship will be advised by the graduate coordinator on academic issues, tuition, petitions, teaching assignments, etc.

It is possible to change a thesis advisor. Permission must be requested from the graduate coordinator. A new advisor must be identified by the student before the end of the term during which the change took place.

It is the thesis advisor's role to supervise the research work performed by the student. In most cases the advisor will provide a theme or a research project that can be developed within a reasonable timeframe and using available resources. It is the student's responsibility to perform the research and follow the guidance provided by the advisor as well as the recommendations of the dissertation committee.

Thesis Requirements

Thesis Advisory Committee Membership

A student writing a thesis must have a Thesis Advisory Committee consisting of at least three members who are approved members of the Graduate Faculty or Graduate Faculty Scholars (www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu/gradfaculty). To learn more about committee membership eligibility and responsibilities, please contact your program advisor or visit the Graduate Catalog > policies > master's program policies.

University Thesis Requirements

A thesis is optional for this program; the following information is intended for those choosing to complete a thesis.

The College of Graduate Studies Thesis and Dissertation page contains information on the university’s requirements for thesis formatting, format review, defenses, final submission, and more. A step-by-step completion guide is also available at Completing Your Thesis or Dissertation.

All university deadlines are listed in the Academic Calendar . Your program or college may have other earlier deadlines; please check with your program and college staff for additional deadlines.

The following requirements must be met by thesis students in their final term:

  • Submit a properly formatted file for initial format review by the format review deadline
  • Submit the Thesis and Dissertation Release Option form well before the defense
  • Defend by the defense deadline
  • Receive format approval (if not granted upon initial review)
  • Submit signed approval form by final submission deadline
  • Submit final thesis document by final submission deadline

Students must format their thesis according to the standards outlined at Formatting the ETD. Formatting questions or issues can be submitted to the Format Help page in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. Format reviews and final submission must be completed in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. The Thesis Approval Form is also available in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site.

The College of Graduate Studies offers several thesis and dissertation Workshops each term. Students are highly encouraged to attend these workshops early in the thesis process to fully understand the above policies and procedures.

The College of Graduate Studies thesis and dissertation office is best reached by email at editor@ucf.edu.

Graduate Research

Areas of Research

The Physics department has very successful research programs in the areas of materials for energy needs, physics at the nanoscale, planetary science, surface science, biological physics, atomic and molecular physics which includes the recent addition of attosecond physics, and a conglomeration of efforts in computational physics. There are also emerging research initiatives in the areas of physics education research and mathematical physics. In the past three years, physics faculty members have published collectively about 150 papers per year and their work has been cited over 3000 times per year.

To learn more, please visit the Physics website.

Human Subjects

If the student chooses to conduct research that involves human subjects (i.e. surveys, interviews, etc.), he or she must gain Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval prior to beginning the study. For access to the IRB submission form and sample consent forms, please visit the Office of Research website: www.research.ucf.edu > Compliance > UCF IRB Webpage > UCF-IRB Principal Investigator’s Manual.

Animal Subjects

If the student chooses to conduct research that involves animal subjects, he or she must gain Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) approval prior to beginning the study. For access to the IACUC submission forms, please visit the Office or Research website: www.research.ucf.edu > Compliance > UCF IACUC Webpage > Animal Use Approval Form.

If you have questions regarding human or animal subjects, please contact an IRB Coordinator at (407) 823-2901.

Ethics in Research

Researchers in every discipline have a responsibility for ethical awareness as the status of the profession rests with each individual researcher. It is important to be honest and ethical in conducting research as well as in taking classes. The ethical collection and use of information includes, but is by no means limited to, the following: confidentiality, accuracy, relevance, self-responsibility, honesty, and awareness of conflict of interest. The University of Arizona’s Code of Research Ethics provides our students with guidelines for responsible practice in research. This code of ethics can be found here: http://facultygovernance.arizona.edu/sites/default/files/Code-of-Ethics-Research.pdf.

Patent and Invention Policy

UCF has three fundamental responsibilities with regard to graduate student research. They are to (1) support an academic environment that stimulates the spirit of inquiry, (2) develop the intellectual property stemming from research, and to (3) disseminate the intellectual property to the general public. UCF owns the intellectual property developed using university resources. The graduate student as inventor will according to this policy share in the proceeds of the invention.

The full policy is available online from the Graduate Catalog: www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu > Policies > General Policies > Patent & Invention Policy.

Financial Support

The Physics Department offers financial support in the form of Graduate Teaching Assistantships (GTAs). These positions are renewable on an academic term basis. When granted, they are guaranteed in the Fall and Spring terms during the first year provided the student maintains a good academic standing. They may also be offered during Summer terms depending on the availability of positions and departmental funds. All Graduate Teaching Assistants are required to be full-time students and that means enrolling in at least 9 credit-hours during Fall and Spring terms and 6 credit-hours in the Summer if they have not yet passed the candidacy exam. Eligible students receive an assistantship with a minimum of $20,600 per year or more.  This amount does not include any tuition waiver and health insurance. After being one year in the program, the GTA positions are not guaranteed, but typically eligible second year students who did not receive a Research Assistantship receive a GTA position.

The maximum FTE (Full Time Employment) a GTA can take is 0.50, corresponding to 20 hours/week. Stipends range between US$ 15 to 20 per hour. Non-matriculation fees are not included in the waiver. All graduate students with an assistantship and full-time status are not charged out-of-state tuition or the non-resident financial aid fee. If a student with a financial package does not maintain full-time status out-of state fees will not be waived.

All students who apply to the program before the target deadline of January 15 are automatically considered candidates for UCF-sponsored fellowship. If you were never contacted by the graduate coordinator regarding these fellowships, either your application was not complete by the target deadline or you were not eligible.

It is important that all students communicate their interest in renewing their GTA to the graduate coordinator at least one month before the beginning of the next term. They must also pre-register for all courses they plan to attend in order to facilitate the assignments of laboratory sections and cause the minimal schedule conflict with their classes.

Regular and affiliated faculty members of the Physics Department often pay graduate research assistants to work in their projects. These positions go by the name of Graduate Research Assistantships (GRAs) and carry an hourly rate similar to a GTA. Eligible students are required to be in good academic standing to take GRAs. UCF also provides full tuition waiver for matriculation fees for the GRAs and the rules are similar to those mentioned above for the case of GTAs. GRA positions can be renewed indefinitely, depending upon mutual interest and the supervisor’s funds availability.

International Students

Several types of employment are available to international students, including on-campus employment. For more information about the types of employment available to international students, and the requirements and restrictions based in visa-type, please see the International Affairs and Global Strategies' website: www.intl.ucf.edu > Current Students > Employment.

Assistantships and Tuition Waivers

For complete information about university assistantship and tuition waivers, please see the UCF Graduate Catalog: www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu > Financial Information.

To be employed and to maintain employment in a graduate position, the student must be:

  • In good academic standing
  • Enrolled full-time

To be awarded and continue receipt of a tuition waiver, the student must be:

  • In good academic standing
  • Enrolled full-time
  • Employed in a graduate position (GTA, GRA, GA) or receiving a University fellowship.

GTA Training Requirements

If the student is hired in the position of Graduate Teaching Associate, Assistant or Graders, there are training requirements that must be met in order for the contract to be processed. Graduate teaching associates must complete the online GTA Grader Training and GTA Assistant Training, complete the online Part I GTA Associate Training, and attend an all day, face-to-face workshop presented by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning. Graduate teaching assistants must complete the online GTA Grader Training and GTA Assistant Training. Graduate teaching graders must complete the online GTA Grader Training. For more information, visit the Graduate Teaching section of the Graduate Student Handbook on the College of Graduate Studies Students website.

International students who will be hired in GTA positions must be proficient in the English language. This is determined by successfully passing the SPEAK test with a score of 55 or better. This test (also known as the Oral Proficiency Exam) is administered by the Center for Multicultural and Multilingual Services (CMMS). International students with a GTA may register for the SPEAK examination by visiting www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/SPEAK_test/.

GTA Performance Assessment

At the completion of each semester the student is employed as a GTA, the student’s performance will be evaluated by the faculty supervisor. The supervisor is typically the faculty member who coordinates the sections of the course where the GTA is an instructor. These assessments will be used to review strengths and weaknesses in the student’s performance in preparation for future employment.

Annual Performance Appraisal

At the beginning of each year the students’ performance will be evaluated by the faculty. This annual assessment reviews performance in course work and in assistantship positions. This appraisal also includes an update to the students’ Plan of Study.

Miscellaneous

GTA positions are assigned usually one month before the beginning of classes. The assignments are based on academic standing, past performance, and availability of funds. Students who want to be considered for these positions must register in advance in order to minimize conflicts between their course schedule and teaching assignments.

GRA positions are made available by individual faculty members of the Physics Department and are not the responsibility of the Graduate Program. Students are strongly encouraged to inquire about these positions by contacting regular and affiliated faculty members of the Department.

Office space is provided to all graduate teaching assistants. A few personal desktop computers for their use are also available. All students admitted into the doctoral program receive a departmental e-mail account, a mailbox, and are listed on the departmental web directory. Students need consent by the Office manager to use the copy machine and to receive departmental stationary and supplies. 

Graduate Student Associations

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is UCF's graduate organization committed to enrich graduate students' personal, educational and professional experience. To learn more or get involved, please visit www.gsa.ucf.edu. For individual department or graduate program organizations, please see program advisor.

Professional Development

Students may take advantage of several professional developments opportunities on campus, such as grant-proposal writing workshops, graduate research fair, and others. Also, every year the College of Graduate Studies sponsors several graduate Award Recognitions. Nominations typically happen in January. Additionally, the Physics Department annually presents an award to the best Graduate Teaching Assistants named the Jack Noon prize. Nominations are sought during the Spring term.

The Physics Department runs a weekly colloquium series open to all faculty and students. The schedule is available on the Department web page at www.physics.ucf.edu > Department > Colloquia. Graduate students are expected to attend the colloquia. An effort is made to try to bring speakers who can give a broad overview of a certain research area and talk in accessible terms about research in the forefront of their fields. Several faculty members also run periodic group meetings and seminar series. Students are encouraged to contact faculty members to learn about their research projects and the positions they may have available in their groups. 

Travel Support

The College of Graduate Studies offers a Graduate Presentation Fellowship that provides funding for master's, specialist, and doctoral students to deliver a research paper or comparable creative activity at a profession meeting. Students must be the primary author and presenter. Visit Graduate Presentation Fellowship for more information.

Student Government Association Funding is available to pay transportation expenses for graduate students who are delivering a research paper or comparable creative activity at a professional meeting. Contact the Student Government Association at 407/823-2191 for more information.

Instructor Training and Development

The Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning (FCTL) promotes excellence in all levels of teaching at the University of Central Florida. They offer several programs for the professional development of Graduate Teaching Assistants at UCF.

  • GTA Training (mandatory for employment as a GTA)
    This training provides information and resources for students who will be instructors. The training covers a variety of topics, including course development, learning theories, lecturing, and academic freedom.

  • Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Program
    This certificate program (12-weeks) consists of group and individualized instruction by Faculty Center staff and experienced UCF professors. Textbooks and materials are provided.

For more information, go to www.fctl.ucf.edu > Events > GTA Programs or call 407/823-3544.

Pathways to Success Workshops

Coordinated by the College of Graduate Studies, the Pathways to Success program offers free development opportunities for graduate students including workshops in Academic Integrity, Graduate Grantsmanship, Graduate Teaching, Personal Development, Professional Development, and Research. For more information and how to register, please visit www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/pathways/.

Graduate Student Association

www.gsa.ucf.edu

Graduate Research Forum

Sponsored by the College of Graduate Studies, the Research Forum is an opportunity for students to showcase their research and creative projects and to receive valuable feedback from faculty judges. Awards for best poster and best oral presentation in each category will be given and all participants will receive recognition.

Graduate Excellence Awards

Each year, the College of Graduate Studies offers graduate students who strive for academic and professional excellence the opportunity to be recognized for their work. The award categories include the following:

Award for Excellence by a Graduate Teaching Assistant – This award is for students who provide teaching support and assistance under the direction of a lead teacher. This award focuses on the extent and quality of the assistance provided by the student to the lead instructor and the students in the class. (Not intended for students who are instructor of record)

Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Teaching – This award is for students who serve as instructors of record and have independent classroom responsibilities. The focus of this award is on the quality of the student’s teaching and the academic contributions of those activities.

Award for the Outstanding Master’s Thesis – It recognizes graduate students for excellence in the master's thesis. The focus of this award is on the quality and contribution of the student's thesis research. Excellence of the master's thesis may be demonstrated by evidence such as, but not limited to: publications in refereed journals, awards and recognitions from professional organizations, and praise from faculty members and other colleagues in the field. The university award will be forwarded to a national-level competition sponsored by the Council of Southern Graduate Schools (CSGS) when the thesis discipline corresponds to the annual submission request.

For the nomination process and eligibility criteria, see the College of Graduate Studies website www.graduate.ucf.edu/GradAwards.

Other

For information about the Council of Southern Graduate Schools (CSGS) thesis and dissertation awards, see their website: www.csgs.org > Awards.

For grant-proposal writing resources: uwc.ucf.edu/gradwriting.php > Writing for Graduate School.

Job Search

Career Services and Experiential Learning

www.career.ucf.edu

Graduate career development issues are unique and include evaluating academic and nonacademic career choices, discussing graduate school effect on career choices, as well as learning, evaluating, and refining networking and interviewing skills. Whatever your needs, the offices of Career Services and Experiential Learning offer services and resources to aid in the career exploration and job search of Master and Doctoral students in every academic discipline.

Forms

  • College of Graduate Studies Forms
    A listing of forms and files for the College of Graduate Studies.
  • Graduate Petition Form
    When unusual situations arise, petitions for exceptions to policy may be requested by the student. Depending on the type of appeal, the student should contact his/her program adviser to begin the petition process.
  • Physics Graduate Forms
    All forms must by typed and submitted directly to the department's Program Assistant.
  • Traveling Scholar Form
    Required form of graduate students who would like to take advantage of resources available on another campus, but not available at UCF; for example, special course offerings, research opportunities, unique laboratories and library collections.

Useful Links