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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2016-2017

Last Updated 2015-03-18

Social Work MSW



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Introduction

Degree Requirements

The MSW degree requires 62 credit hours. Fifty percent of courses must be at the 6000 level. Students who complete a BSW at an accredited Social Work program and who are accepted into the Advanced Standing program can receive up to 30 credits toward their MSW degree program depending upon approved prior course work.

Educational standards for all social work programs are established by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the national accreditation body for professional social work education. Curriculum direction and content is regulated by the CSWE through its accreditation standards. Our overall primary goal is to prepare students for social work practice with a community-based orientation. All graduate social work programs provide material in the foundation areas: social welfare policies and services; social work research; human behavior and the social environment; social work practice; field education/internship. Differences in programs emerge in the advanced curriculum or areas of specialization. The Foundation curriculum provides the generalist perspective as the foundation for the advanced curriculum.

The first year of study in the two-year curriculum provides students with the theoretical generalist perspective. Classes are completed in Human Behavior and the Social Environment, Social Work Practice, Social Welfare Policies and Services, Social Work Research, and Social Work Field Placement. Movement to specialization takes place in the second year of the curriculum. Often referred to as the advanced curriculum, the educational content focuses on community based social work practice.

While enrolled in courses, students will complete a field placement, also referred to as an internship, at an area social service agency. You will be placed in one setting for your generalist year of the MSW Program and a second, different setting, during your advanced year. You will also be participating in a field integration seminar designed to help you further integrate theoretical content from the courses with your field experience.

Program Tracks

The Master of Social Work Program offers several program tracks to students on the Orlando campus including: a Full-Time track, a Full-Time Advanced Standing track and a Part-Time track.  Only students who have completed a Bachelor’s in Social Work from an accredited school of Social Work within the last six years can apply to the Advanced Standing track.  Mixed mode and some online courses support part-time study. Applicants must choose a track and remain in that track for the duration of their MSW program. Track(s) may have different requirements.

*Please see the graduate programs section of the graduate catalog for official program track specific requirements.

Students are expected to follow the sequence and timing of courses in their Plan of Study. Students are required to meet with the MSW Advisor and receive authorization from the MSW Program Coordinator in order to petition to change their Plan of Study. Required courses are typically offered only in the semester indicated. If you take courses out of sequence it may delay your graduation.

Students should use the online course registration system to enroll in courses. Some courses (e.g., if they are not in your Plan of Study) will require special permission codes provided by the MSW Program Coordinator’s office for access to registration. Please note: Drop/Add deadlines are posted on the UCF Academic Calendar. Changes in registration must be made before these deadlines or you will forfeit tuition payment. Students are responsible for knowing deadlines.

General Coursework

Educational standards for all social work programs are established by the Council on Social Work Education, the national accreditation body for professional social work education. Curriculum direction and content is regulated by the Council through its accreditation standards.  All accredited MSW programs include a “Foundation” curriculum and an “Advanced Clinical Specialization” curriculum.  The Foundation curriculum provides the generalist perspective and is taken prior to the Advanced Clinical Specialization curriculum.  All MSW programs include the following Foundation courses: social welfare policies and services; social work research; human behavior and the social environment; social work practice; field education/internship. Differences in MSW programs emerge in the Advanced Clinical Specialization curriculum or areas of specialization. Our specialization and primary goal is to prepare students for clinical social work practice with a community-based orientation.

While enrolled in courses, students will complete a field placement, also referred to as an internship, at an area social service agency. You will be placed in one setting for your Foundation year of the MSW Program and a second, different setting, during your Advanced Clinical Specialization year. The emphasis of the foundation internship will be on generalist practice while the emphasis during the advanced year will be on clinical practice. You will also be participating in a field integration seminar designed to help you further integrate theoretical content from the courses with your field experience.

Independent learning is demonstrated throughout the curriculum through the process of inquiry and dialogue. Projects such as research studies, clinical assessments and treatment plans, papers and internships also contribute to the self-development of our students. The research study and final report will focus on reviewing and analyzing contemporary research in a student’s particular specialization within the profession in order to help students acquire knowledge and skills pertaining to research-based best practices in that specialization area.

The School offers a graduate certificate in Military Social Work and Marriage and Family Therapy. These certificates involve specific courses in the social work program. See the graduate catalogue for these specific requirements.

Field Experience

Field Education is where social work comes alive! It is where students begin to apply the knowledge they have learned in the classroom to the practice of social work in the field. The Field Education Office faculty are responsible for assigning students to their field placement sites. Students begin this process by submitting an application for field placement to the Field Education Office. Upon receipt of the application, a meeting is scheduled with the student and a member of the field faculty to plan for their field placement. Students are not allowed to contact agencies on their own to discuss the possibility of an internship with any agency. Making contact with an agency without going through the Field Education Office will result in that agency being disqualified as a potential internship site for the student.

Any changes in the field placement location must be approved in writing by the Field Education Office faculty before the change can be made.

For detailed policies related to Field Education, see the online Field Manual at www.cohpa.ucf.edu/social/field_education/.

Field Education Hours and Seminar

In the generalist year field internship, students are assigned to an agency placement for 400 total hours. Full time students complete these hours over Fall and Spring semesters (200 FA/SP) for an average of 14 hours per week. Part time students complete the 400 hours over Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters (150 FA/SP; 100 SU) for an average of 10 hours each week. In addition to completing hours at the internship, students will attend a field education seminar held bi-weekly.

During the clinical field placement, students are placed in a different setting for a total of 600 internship hours. Full- time students complete the clinical internship hours over Fall and Spring semesters (300 hours FA/SP) for an average of 19 hours per week. Part-time students complete the 600 hours over Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters (225 FA/SP; 150 SU) for an average of 15 hours each week during Fall and Spring semesters and 13.5 hours during Summer semester. Each field education course has an accompanying field seminar that meets bi-weekly.

Employment Based Internships

NOTE: STUDENTS ARE LIMITED TO ONE EMPLOYMENT BASED INTERNSHIP.

Students may be allowed to complete one field placement in their current place of employment. A number of critical requirements must be met in order to complete a placement in a student’s employment site including:

The agency must meet all social work field requirements and be affiliated with the School of Social work (including supervision is provided by an approved MSW).

The field assignments must be significantly different from the student’s current work responsibilities. The learning competencies for the employment based internship must relate to the student’s level of internship.

The student and agency administrator must complete the Employment Based Internship Agreement form found on the Field Education website and submit it to the Field Education Office at least 30 days prior to the start of the internship. Students should not assume that these placements will be automatically approved. Applications will not be accepted after the 30 day deadline.

Advance Standing and Full-Time Students

New students will be emailed a Field Education Application and should submit the application to the Field Education Office.  Returning full-time students must complete the MSW Returning Students Field Education Application during their second semester of study and submit the completed application to the Field Education Office by the designated date.Evening (after 5pm) and weekend placements are extremely limited. The School of Social Work is under no obligation to provide such placements. Consequently, field placements cannot be guaranteed to students who require evening and weekend placements. Students must complete at least 50% of their field hours during the agency’s normal business hours.

Part-Time Students

Part-time students must complete a Field Education Application and submit the application to the Field Education Office during their second semester of study by the designated date. Evening (after 5pm) and weekend placements are extremely limited.The School of Social Work is under no obligation to provide such placements. Consequently, field placements cannot be guaranteed to students who require evening and weekend placements. Students must complete at least 50% of their field hours during the agency’s normal business hours.

Field Education Requirements

Students must meet with the faculty of the Field Education Office to discuss and determine their placement site. Please DO NOT contact any agency regarding an internship on your own. This process is handled through the Field Office and any agency you contact outside the process will be DISQUALIFIED as a possible internship site.

Students are limited to one field placement per internship site while a student in the School of Social Work.

Students must complete and submit a signed Placement Confirmation Form to the Field Education Office prior to starting their internship. Any hours accrued prior to submitting the Placement Confirmation Form will not be counted. Students will be provided with a copy of this form during their interview with field faculty member to discuss their field placement.

Students must attend MANDATORY field education orientation prior to starting their internship. Students may not begin their field placement until they have attended orientation. Hours accrued at an internship site will not be counted if a student has not attended orientation. Please contact the Field Education Office in advance if you are unable to attend field education orientation due to extraordinary circumstances.

If a student is terminated from a field placement, the Field Education Office will select the next placement site for the student and the student will be informed of the placement.

Termination from a field placement due to performance will result in the loss of field hours that have already been completed.

Students must complete a majority of field hours (minimum of 75%) prior to the end of the semester in order to receive a grade of Satisfactory for field education for that semester. Students who are terminated from two field placements may be dismissed from the program.

School of Social Work Mission Statement

The UCF School of Social Work prepares generalist and advanced clinical social work students to become practitioners who promote optimal well-being, human rights, and social and economic justice. The school focuses on social change from a regional and global perspective with individuals, families, groups and communities in diverse practice settings.

School of Social Work Goals

To prepare professional MSW/clinical social work practitioners to:

  • Apply professional knowledge, skills, and values with diverse individuals, families, groups, and communities.
  • Engage in ethical practice grounded in human rights and social and economic justice.
  • Promote the optimal well-being of vulnerable, oppressed, and marginalized populations by building on their strengths and resilience through collaborative community partnerships.
  • Integrate research informed practice in generalist settings and assess, intervene, and evaluate in advanced clinical practice settings.
  • Advocate for policies and services that promote social change and the quality of professional social work practice.

Specifically, our graduates are trained to:

CSWE 2008 EPAS Competencies and Practice Behaviors

Educational Policy 2.1.1 Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly: Social workers serve as representatives of the profession, its mission, and its core values. They know the profession’s history. Social workers commit themselves to the profession’s enhancement and to their own professional conduct and growth.
1. Advocate for client access to the services of social work.
2. Practice personal reflection and self-correction to assure continual professional development.
3. Attend to professional roles and boundaries.
4. Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and communication.
5. Engage in career-long learning.
6. Use supervision and consultation. 

Educational Policy 2.1.2 Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice: Social workers have an obligation to conduct themselves ethically and to engage in ethical decision-making. Social workers are knowledgeable about the value base of the profession, its ethical standards, and relevant law.
7. Recognize and manage personal values in a way that allows professional values to guide practice.
8. Make ethical decisions by applying standards of the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics and, as applicable, of the International Federation of Social Workers/International Association of Schools of Social Work Ethics in Social Work, Statement of Principles.
9. Tolerate ambiguity in resolving ethical conflicts.
10. Apply strategies of ethical reasoning to arrive at principled decisions.

Educational Policy 2.1.3 Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments: Social workers are knowledgeable about the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and reasoned discernment. They use critical thinking augmented by creativity and curiosity. Critical thinking also requires the synthesis and communication of relevant information.
11. Distinguish, appraise, and integrate multiple sources of knowledge, including research-based knowledge and practice wisdom.
12. Analyze models of assessment, prevention, intervention, and evaluation.
13. Demonstrate effective oral and written communication in working with individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities, and colleagues.

Educational Policy 2.1.4 Engage diversity and difference in practice: Social workers understand how diversity characterizes and shapes the human experience and is critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, political ideology, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation. Social workers appreciate that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim.
14. Recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create or enhance privilege and power.
15. Gain sufficient self-awareness to eliminate the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse groups.
16. Recognize and communicate their understanding of the importance of difference in shaping life experiences.
17. View themselves as learners and engage those with whom they work as informants. 

Educational Policy  2.1.5 Advance human rights and social and economic justice: Each person, regardless of position in society, has basic human rights, such as freedom, safety, privacy, an adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers recognize the global interconnections of oppression and are knowledgeable about theories of justice and strategies to promote human and civil rights. Social work incorporates social justice practices in organizations, institutions, and society to ensure that these basic human rights are distributed equitably and without prejudice.
18. Understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination.
19. Advocate for human rights and social and economic justice.
20. Engage in practices that advance social and economic justice. 

Educational Policy  2.1.6 Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research: Social workers use practice experience to inform research, employ evidence-based interventions, evaluate their own practice, and use research findings to improve practice, policy, and social service delivery.
Social workers comprehend quantitative and qualitative research and understand scientific and ethical approaches to building knowledge.
21. Use practice experience to inform scientific inquiry.
22. Use research evidence to inform practice. 

Educational Policy  2.1.7 Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment: Social workers are knowledgeable about human behavior across the life course; the range of social systems in which people live; and the ways social systems promote or deter people in maintaining or achieving health and well-being. Social workers apply theories and knowledge from the liberal arts to understand biological, social, cultural, psychological, and spiritual development.
23. Utilize conceptual frameworks to guide the process of assessment, intervention, and evaluation.
24. Critique and apply knowledge to understand person and environment. 

Educational Policy  2.1.8 Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services: Social work practitioners understand that policy affects service delivery, and they actively engage in policy practice. Social workers know the history and current structures of social policies and services; the role of policy in service delivery; and the role of practice in policy development.
25. Analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance social well-being.
26. Collaborate with colleagues and clients for effective policy action.

Educational Policy 2.1.9 Respond to contexts that shape practice: Social workers are informed, resourceful, and proactive in responding to evolving organizational, community, and societal contexts at all levels of practice. Social workers recognize that the context of practice is dynamic, and use knowledge and skill to respond proactively.
27. Continuously discover, appraise, and attend to locales, populations, scientific and technological developments, and emerging societal trends to provide relevant services.
28. Provide leadership in promoting sustainable changes in service delivery and practice to improve the quality of social services.

Educational Policy 2.1.10 Engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities: Professional practice involves the dynamic and interactive processes of engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation at multiple levels. Social workers have the knowledge and skills to practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Practice knowledge includes identifying, analyzing, and implementing evidence-based interventions designed to achieve client goals; using research and technological advances; evaluating program outcomes and practice effectiveness; developing, analyzing, advocating, and providing leadership for policies and services; and promoting social and economic justice.

Educational Policy 2.1.10 (a) Engagement
29. Substantively and affectively prepare for action with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.
30. Use empathy and other interpersonal skills.
31. Develop a mutually agreed-on focus of work and desired outcomes.

Educational Policy 2.1.10 (b) Assessment
32. Collect, organize, and interpret client data.
33. Assess client strengths and limitations.
34. Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives.
35. Select appropriate intervention strategies.

Educational Policy 2.1.10 (c) Intervention
36. Initiate actions to achieve organizational goals.
37. Implement prevention interventions that enhance client capacities.
38. Help clients resolve problems.
39. Negotiate, mediate, and advocate for clients.
40. Facilitate transitions and endings.

Educational Policy 2.1.10 (d) Evaluation
41. Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate interventions.

Educational Policy 2.1.1—Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly: Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work recognize the importance of the therapeutic relationship, the person-in-environment and strengths perspectives, the professional use of self with clients, and adherence to ethical guidelines of professional behavior. Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work readily identify as social work professionals and:
42. Demonstrate professional use of self with client(s);
43. Understand and identify professional strengths, limitations and challenges; and
44. Develop, manage and maintain therapeutic relationships with clients within the person-in-environment and strengths perspectives.

Educational Policy 2.1.2—Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice: Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work are knowledgeable about ethical issues, legal parameters and shifting societal mores that affect the therapeutic relationship. Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work:
45. Apply ethical decision-making skills to issues specific to community-based clinical social work;
46. Identify and use knowledge of relationship dynamics, including power differentials; and
47. Recognize and manage personal biases as they affect the therapeutic relationship in the service of the clients’ well-being.

Educational Policy 2.1.3—Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments:Advanced practitioners understand and differentiate the strengths and limitations of multiple practice theories and methods, clinical processes and technical tools, including differential diagnosis. They deconstruct theories and methods to evaluate how they relate to clients and client systems within their environmental context. They regularly question and reflect on their own assumptions and consider how these might affect practice. Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work:
48. Engage in reflective practice;
49. Identify and articulate clients’ strengths and vulnerabilities;
50. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of multiple theoretical perspectives and differentially apply them to client situations; and
51. Communicate professional judgments to other social workers and to professionals from other disciplines in both verbal and written format.

Educational Policy 2.1.4—Engage diversity and difference in practice:Advanced practitioners are knowledgeable about many forms of diversity and difference and how these influence the therapeutic relationship and clients’ presenting issues. Advanced practitioners are knowledgeable about the ways in which various dimensions of diversity affect (a) explanations of illness, (b) help-seeking behaviors and (c) healing practices (Cal-SWEC, 2006). Advanced practitioners are cultural beings and understand how clinical practice choices can be culture-bound. Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work:
52. Research and apply knowledge of diverse populations to enhance client well-being;
53. Work effectively with diverse populations; and
54. Identify and use practitioner/client differences from a strengths perspective.

Educational Policy 2.1.5—Advance human rights and social and economic justice: Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work understand the oppressive nature of systems/policies that deny access and professions that employ methods of coercion. Advanced practitioners understand the ways in which systems and policies violate rights and deny justice. Advanced practitioners also understand the ways in which social work can be used for both oppressive and anti-oppressive purposes. They understand strategies for advancing human rights and social and economic justice through anti-oppressive practice, system change and policy change. Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work:
55. Advocate for the creation and revision of practices and tools that support anti-oppressive practice; and
56. Advocate for systems and policies that create and provide equal access for all populations.

Educational Policy 2.1.6—Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research:
Advanced community-based clinical practitioners are knowledgeable about evidence-based interventions, best practices, and the evidence-based research process. Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work:
57. use the evidence-based practice process in clinical assessment and intervention with clients

Educational Policy 2.1.7—Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment:
Advanced practitioners understand how to synthesize and differentially apply the theories of human behavior and the social environment (biological, developmental, psychological, social, cultural and spiritual). They are familiar with diagnostic classification systems used in the formulation of a comprehensive assessment. Advanced practitioners understand how familial and socio-cultural contexts influence definitions of psychopathology. They have a working knowledge of psychotropic medications that are typically used in the treatment of mental health disorders, including expected results and side effects. Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work:
58. Synthesize and differentially apply theories of human behavior and the social environment to guide clinical practice;
59. Use bio-psycho-social-spiritual theories and systems in formulation of comprehensive assessments.

Educational Policy 2.1.8—Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services: Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work understand the power of decision-making within inter-disciplinary teams and systems. Further, they understand the implications of these decisions for the well-being of their clients and the importance of the social work role within these decision-making spheres. They understand strategies for advancing both the well-being of the client and the voice of the profession. Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work:
60. Analyze policy with regard to the policy’s impact on clients and practice; and
61. Advocate for social policies or agency policies that will advance the social and economic well-being of clients.

Educational Policy 2.1.9—Respond to contexts that shape practice: Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work are knowledgeable about how relational, organizational, and community systems may impact clients. They anticipate and react to evolving cultural, technological, geographical, political, legal, economic, and environmental contexts. They encourage clients to affect changes within these contexts. Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work:
62. Assess the quality of clients’ interactions within their social contexts; and
63. Work collaboratively with others to impact systemic change that is sustainable.

Educational Policy 2.1.10(a)–(d)—Engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

Educational Policy 2.1.10(a)—Engagement
Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work:
64. Develop a culturally responsive therapeutic relationship; and
65. Establish a relationally based process that encourages clients to be equal participants in the establishment of treatment goals and expected outcomes.

Educational Policy 2.1.10(b)—Assessment
Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work:
66. Use bio-psycho-social-spiritual assessment tools that are evidence-based and culturally sensitive;
67. Assess clients’ readiness for change; and
68. Assess client coping strategies to reinforce and improve adaptation to life situations, circumstances and events; and engage in continuous clinical assessment and modify as needed.

Educational Policy 2.1.10(c)—Intervention
Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work:
69. Critically evaluate, select, and apply best practice theories and evidence-based interventions;
70. Demonstrate the use of appropriate clinical techniques for a range of presenting concerns identified in the assessment, including crisis intervention strategies as needed; and
71. Collaborate with other professionals to coordinate treatment interventions.

Educational Policy 2.1.10(d)—Evaluation
Advanced practitioners in community-based clinical social work
72. Use clinical evaluation of the process and/or outcomes to develop best practice interventions for a range of bio-psycho-social-spiritual conditions

Advising

The MSW Advisor will meet with MSW students at Orientation and review with them their “Program of Study” which will detail the specific courses and sequence of courses they will take to complete their degree. Students are encouraged to meet with the MSW Advisor to discuss concerns or problems in their Program of Study. Students must meet with the MSW Advisor if they are going to petition to change their Program of Study.

Common Reasons Why You May Want To See the Advisor: 

  • Alternatives within the program (e.g. needing to take time off)
  • Clarification of policies and procedures
  • Reviewing academic requirements
  • Campus Resources

Professional Advising

Faculty and agency supervisors through classroom and field experiences contribute to students’ professional advisement relative to knowledge and skills in areas of study or fields of practice and professional practice roles. Faculty are a great resource for careers in social work related to their fields of expertise. Individual faculty members are available by appointment to provide professional advising.

Independent Study

Purpose: Independent Study (IS) provides an opportunity for the student to explore in depth an area of particular interest. It may not be taken in lieu of, or as a substitute for, those courses which are specified in the curriculum as requirements (core classes or electives). Rather the IS serves to extend the student’s knowledge in a particu¬lar subject which may not have been included or covered in depth within the content of scheduled courses.

Independent Study may also be appropriately used when the School as well as the student would receive benefit from a particular research study.

Requirements:

  1. Independent Study (IS) may be requested by a social work student with a grade point average of 3.00 who has completed at least twelve hours of course work in social work. 
  2. The outside limit of IS course credit in social work is six hours, with a maximum of four hours permitted in any one semester. 
  3. Although IS is ordinarily taken by one student with one or more faculty members, on occasion more than one student may be jointly participating in a study. When more than one student is involved in the project and more than one instructor, students and faculty should clarify arrangements for meetings and should be clear about procedures to be followed with respect to grading. 
  4. No student may receive IS credit for covering only that content found in another course. 
  5. It is necessary that a plan for the IS be developed by the student and the instructor. The plan should include objectives, justification of study criteria, a brief content outline, bibliography, frequency of student-faculty contact, expectations for a research paper or report (see Procedure #3), and the methods of evaluation. 
  6. MSW students may obtain credit hours to meet Social Work requirements from an IS course taken in another department of the university. IS outside the School is acceptable if the study is related to the student’s specific educational objectives. The same procedures must be followed by the student and the instructor as if the student were taking the IS in the School of Social Work (see Procedures). It is the student’s responsibility to see to it that the instructor in the other department is acquainted with these procedures.

Procedures:

  1. The formal IS procedure begins with the student seeking authorization from the Program Advisor who establishes the student’s eligibility for the IS in accord with the policy established above. 
  2. The student obtains an agreement from an instructor to perform the IS under that instructor’s guidance. 
  3. The student and the faculty member meet to arrange an appropriate course of study and the required outcome. 
  4. The student and faculty member complete the IS per their agreement. 
  5. The Instructor needs to contact the Program Advisor to arrange for the online permission for the student to register for the course. The Program Advisor informs the student when it is approved. AFTER PERMISSION HAS BEEN GRANTED AND THE STUDENT WILL ONLY HAVE 48 HOURS TO REGISTER FOR THE CLASS.

Graduate Certificate Programs

There are two optional certificates currently being offered. Students are only able to complete one certificate during their MSW graduate program. See the graduate catalogue for these specific requirements.

The Graduate Certificate in Military Social Work will prepare students to provide behavioral health services, including: mental health counseling aimed at building psychological resilience; treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, suicide risk assessment and prevention techniques; and family therapy for strengthening military, veterans and their families during and after deployment.

The Graduate Certificate in Marriage and Family Therapy is housed within the Counselor Education Program in the College of Education. The certificate program is designed to provide advanced training to students in the Counselor Education and Social Work programs and for practicing counselors and therapists working with families, couples, and children. 

Serving Diverse Populations and Peforming Professional Tasks

Social work is not an easy profession; it requires disciplined delivery of services, set within a conceptual framework based on scientifically tested theories. Ethical professional practice is guided by complex social, behavioral, and practice theories. Social work is an art and a science. Not all individuals are able to “do” social work.

Populations Served: Social workers intervene directly with and on behalf of diverse populations. Thus, students are expected to be agreeable to working with adult men and women; people from all nationalities, cultures, religions; children; people with disabilities; older adults; people who are lesbian, gay, transgendered +; persons with HIV/AIDS and/or other physical and mental conditions; and people who are economically disadvantaged.

Modes of Intervention: Additionally, social workers provide services through a variety of helping strategies. Therefore, students are expected to perform tasks that may include, but are not limited to: assessments; contracting; home visits; office interviews; individual, family, and group counseling; referrals; case management; program and community evaluations; grant writing; advocacy; education; and follow-up.

A student, who in the judgment of the faculty is unwilling or unable to meet the expectations of serving diverse populations and performing professional tasks may be denied admission or may deemed ineligible to complete the degree requirements. In such cases, the student and his/her academic advisor may explore alternative educational and career options.

General Policies

Knights email

You must use your Knights email (user@knights.ucf.edu) when communicating with UCF faculty and staff. Faculty and staff will not respond to emails sent from personal (gmail, etc.) or employment accounts.

Course Changes and Schedule Exceptions

The instructor reserves the right to make announced changes in course requirements, content, schedule, and assignments.

Health Concerns 

Special Accommodations 

The University of Central Florida is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for all persons with disabilities. Students with disabilities must contact the professor at the beginning/or prior to the semester to discuss the needed accommodations. No accommodations will be provided until the student has met with the professor to request accommodations. Students who need accommodations must be registered with the Student Disability Services, Student Resource Center, Room 132, Phone (407)-823-2371, TTY/TDD only Phone (407)-823-2116, before requesting accommodations from the professor. 

Illness or Injury 

It is the responsibility of each student to inform the program faculty of any illness or injury that may prevent him or her from performing any activity in the class or clinical setting. The instructor and the Program Director must agree upon any modification or postponement or required work.

Policy on Class Behavior

Class Participation and Attendance: Professional functioning typically involves collegial sharing and peer support. By being present in class, students develop a commitment to, and a skill in, mutual problem solving and team work. In some classes, part of the student’s grade is based on participation, team work, and attendance. Class attendance requirements are posted on every course syllabus. A student’s grade may be lowered for lack of participation, tardiness, and absences. Three or more absences, regardless of reason, may, according to the course syllabus, result in a letter grade reduction in the course.

Student Papers: Effective written expression is essential for professional practitioners where records often decide a client’s fate, as in court and medical cases. Thus, students are expected to always present their ideas clearly and properly. Grammar, punctuation, and spelling are to be correct in all papers submitted to professors and field instructors. Papers are to be typed, double-spaced, and conform to the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) (latest edition) standards of writing. Papers not conforming to these standards of style and exactness may be returned without a grade. Check with your instructor regarding specific guidelines.

Meeting Course Assignment Deadlines: Students are expected to submit assignments on the identified due date. For each assignment submitted late, the student’s final course grade may be reduced by 5 points (for example, from 93 to 87) or by 5% each day the assignment is late. Please see the course syllabus for details. No assignment will be accepted after the last day of class. Students are not to fax papers or field logs, or to slip assignments under instructors’ doors.

Incomplete Work and “I” Grades: When a student is unable to complete all requirements for a course by the end of the term due to extenuating (death in the family, serious injury to self or family member…) circumstances, he/she may be assigned an incomplete grade (“I”) by the instructor. An incomplete grade may only be given by an instructor when remaining requirements can be completed by the student in a short time after the term has ended. The student should see the instructor to request an incomplete grade and to make arrangements for completing course require¬ments by the deadline set by the instructor. The student and the faculty member need to sign an incomplete grade agreement form, describing the course requirements and the date of completion. A student who does not complete required assign-ments within this time frame, may, at the discretion of the instructor, receive a failing grade (“F”) for the course. If this work is not completed within a year, this “I” automatically becomes an “F.”

Field Education: While in Field placement, agency staff members serve as Field Instructors, Placement Supervisors, and agency colleagues. As such, sexual harassment of a student by field agency staff is also strictly prohibited. Field agency staff members are to conduct themselves in a professional manner in all of their dealings with UCF social work students. Dating between field staff and students is not acceptable. Dating between students and clients is not acceptable. Allegations by students regarding sexual harassment by field staff should be reported to the student’s Field Liaison and to the Director of the School of Social Work.

Reference Letters

Student’s written request for employment and/or graduate student reference letter should be directed to his/her faculty member at least two weeks before the letter is needed. If a student requires more than one reference letter from the faculty of the School of Social Work, the student must directly initiate such requests to the faculty member(s) of his/her choice.

Confidentiality

 The General Counsel for UCF has instructed the School of Social Work as follows:

  • All information contained in a student record is confidential and cannot be released to any agency or outside organization without a signed consent from the student.
  • The University is not permitted to complete background clearance checks, or driving record checks on students. If placement sites require this information, the student must have the checks performed at the students’ expense.
  • Field placement organizations should not assume that a student referred by the School of Social Work has a “cleared” background.
  • The only exception to this policy is when the student is also an employee of the University. In this situation employee records can be released.

Student Policies Related to Professionalism

The development of a social work professional is of utmost importance to the School of Social Work. Professionalism encompasses areas of behavior and qualities that are expected of Social Work students in the school setting and in the student fieldwork experiences. Attendance, timeliness and attire are all reflections of professionalism. When professionalism is assessed, instructors will also consider each student's conduct in their class, the quality of content of interaction, the contribution to class discussion as related to preparedness. Students who are in violation of these behaviors will be cited and counseled. Repeated disregard or violation of these behaviors may constitute a serious problem. The faculty may then decide that the student is not yet capable of professional responsibility and the professional role. The faculty may recommend remedial action, a leave of absence, or may request that the student resign from the program.

Some of the criteria by which a student's professional demeanor is measured are:

  • Adherence to the rules and regulations as stipulated by the University of Central Florida and the School of Social Work. 
  • Complying with the National Association of Social Workers’ Code of Ethics (for a more detailed overview of NASW Code of Ethics please refer to the NASW web site at www.socialworkers.org/pubs/code/code.asp). 
  • Attendance: It is required for students to attend each scheduled class and absences will not be excused unless previously determined by the instructor. In the rare instance that a student cannot attend class, it is their responsibility to obtain class information from a fellow classmate. See Section on “Policy on Class Behavior” for further information. 
  • Timeliness: Students are expected to be on time. Tardiness may be reflected in the course grade. 
  • Being respectful and courteous to fellow students and to other professional and non-professional personnel (both verbally and through emails). Respect to those presenting or speaking is expected. 
  • Guest Speakers / Presentations: The Social Work Program often utilizes guest speakers from the community. Students in the program must demonstrate professional conduct, respect, and appreciation for these professionals' donation of their time to further your education. Professional attire & conduct is required when guest speakers are present. 
  • Recognizing personal or professional limitations and requesting assistance when necessary. 
  • Appropriate class participation: Students are expected to ask questions at appropriate times to expand knowledge of the material. Pertinent student-to-student interaction is considered a valuable part of the learning environment and appropriate articulation of critical-thinking during class time will be viewed as efforts toward developing professional judgment. 
  • Turning off cellular phones, and other electronic devices, in class and in field settings. Inappropriate use of computers or electronic devices during class, (i.e. web searches, texting, facebooking, tweeting, etc.) that is not part of the class discussion as deemed by the instructor may result in the student being asked to leave the room. Additionally, the student may receive a deduction in the final course grade. 
  • Appropriate non-distracting behavior while on campus, in hallways and in classrooms 
  • Demonstrating honesty and veracity. 
  • Expressing or exhibiting interests in his/her profession. 
  • Accepting constructive criticism offered by instructors and others in an appropriate manner. 
  • As this is a professional program, students are expected to wear appropriate attire and footwear in the classroom and in the field placement site.
The School of Social Work reserves the right to terminate a student after admission to the MSW program if, in the judgment of the faculty, the student demonstrates behaviors incongruent to working in the field of social work and/or violates the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics.
 

Academic Dishonesty

Academic dishonesty falls into one of two categories: cheating and plagiarism.

Cheating is the violation of classroom rules of honesty with respect to examinations and assignments. Any student helping another student cheat is as guilty as the student assisted. Students found guilty of cheating may receive a failing grade for the assignment and may receive a failing grade for the course. Course syllabi will specify the consequences of cheating for each course. 

Plagiarism

Many incidents of plagiarism result from students’ lack of understanding about what constitutes plagiarism. However, you are expected to familiarize yourself with UCF’s policy on plagiarism. All work you submit must be your own scholarly and creative efforts. UCF’s Golden Rule defines plagiarism as follows: “whereby another’s work is used or appropriated without any indication of the source, thereby attempting to convey the impression that such work is the student’s own.”

Plagiarism is everyone’s business. Students who earn their degrees honestly by engaging in the scholarly work that develops the skills and knowledge the UCF degree symbolizes are affected by their peers’ plagiarism and cheating. Such cheating and plagiarism is unfair to those who work to earn their grades and degrees honestly, and is contrary to the values expressed in the UCF Creed.

Whenever you submit work for academic credit, your instructor should be able to trust that it is the result of your own scholarly and creative efforts. In most cases it is appropriate to use others’ work to support your academic work. In fact, the ability to use others’ ideas, expressions, arguments, images, or data to support your work is an important aspect of academic research.

However, whenever you use another’s work to support your own, you must give a full citation that credits the original source. Not giving credit to the original author creates the false impression that work you present for academic credit represents the results of your efforts to master the skills and knowledge that is the purpose of the academic exercise.
You must clearly identify which parts of your work are derived from each source, using in-text citations, footnotes or endnotes. Ending with a list of “works consulted” is not sufficient. Ask your instructor about appropriate citation style. See UCF library’s guides to citing sources: http://library.ucf.edu/Reference/Guides/Citation.asp.

Furthermore, a significant portion of your work must be the result of your own scholarly efforts. A succession of quotations with a few of your own comments to string them together is unlikely to be considered acceptable scholarship.

UCF’s Golden rule defines plagiarism as the following: “whereby another’s work is used or appropriated without any indication of the source, thereby attempting to convey the impression that such work is the student’s own.”

Thus you commit plagiarism whenever you use in your academic work any argument, image, expression or other element of another’s work that is not common knowledge and is not clearly credited to its original author.

Common knowledge is difficult to define precisely. Consider as a rough guideline that you do not necessarily need citations for facts that anyone could reasonably be expected to know. If in doubt, err on the side of being helpful to your reader, though. If it is possible that a classmate who reads your paper finds a statement of yours to be interesting, surprising or otherwise useful, and the reader is interested in investigating further, give them a citation that directs them to your sources.

Self-plagiarism also undermines the academic purpose of the exercise of working on course assignments. You plagiarize yourself if you submit for university credit a piece of work that is the same or substantially similar to work for which you have already gained or intend to gain university credit, at this or any other university. To avoid self-plagiarism, you must have prior permission from the relevant instructor(s), and give full attribution to the source (i.e yourself).

Any expression you use that is identical to one in the original source must be presented using “quotation marks,” and the source should be clearly identified.

Any other aspect of another’s work you use that is not a direct quotation should be a paraphrase or summary in your own words. Simply rearranging the wording of sentences or replacing words with synonyms (changing “occasionally” to “sometimes”) does not qualify as an adequate paraphrase in your own words. See the following for advice about acceptable paraphrasing owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/563/1/.

Plagiarism is a serious academic offense. Typical penalties may be either loss of credit for the assignment or a failing grade in the course. Perpetrators may also be required to take an academic integrity seminar. Serious cases can lead to academic probation, suspension, expulsion from the University, or the revocation of a degree.

Turnitin.com

Many of your courses utilize turnitin.com, an automated system which instructors can use to quickly and easily compare each student's assignment with billions of web sites, as well as an enormous database of student papers that grows with each submission. Accordingly, you will be expected to submit all assignments in both hard copy and electronic format. After the assignment is processed, as an instructor I receive a report from turnitin.com that states if and how another author’s work was used in the assignment. For a more detailed look at this process, visit www.turnitin.com.

For a description of the University’s policy and procedures related to student academic behavior, please see The Golden Rule: A Handbook for Students, or go to the website: www.goldenrule.sdes.ucf.edu.

Misconduct

Personal Wrongdoing: 

Examples of student misbehavior that may result in immediate dismissal:

  1. Forced or coerced sexual behavior
  2. Sexual activity with clients including, but not limited to, kissing, fondling, or sexual intercourse
  3. Physical harm or actions directed at clients, students, faculty, or staff, such as hitting, punching, spanking, or slapping
  4. Physical or emotional threats directed toward clients, students, faculty, or staff
  5. The acceptance of gifts or money from clients that are not considered standard payment for services received on behalf of the student’s agency or field setting; students shall not ask for nor expect gifts from clients
  6. Illegal or unethical behavior that limits or takes away clients’ rights or results in financial, material, or emotional loss for clients or gain for social work students
  7. Drinking or taking illegal drugs at school or in the field
  8. Being drunk or high on drugs in class or in the field
  9. Stealing
  10. Insubordination.

Non-Discrimination

Consistent with the University of Central Florida’s policy regarding equal opportunity and affirmative action, the School of Social Work is committed to carrying out its program without regard to sex, race, national origin, religion, disability, sexual orientation, or veteran status.

The School provides opportunities to students without regard to race, sex, color, disability, religion, sexual orientation, or ethnic origin. However, to diversify its student population, the Department is committed to recruiting, admitting, and retaining minority students.

This same non-discrimination policy is applied to the School’s selection and use of social service agencies for the placement of field students. In addition, field agencies must be able to show evidence of policy commitments to non-discrimination in both service delivery and employment (Field Education Manual).

Sexual Harassment

Among the principles which guide the School of Social Work is the belief that all people deserve to be treated in a manner that recognizes their individuality, dignity and self-worth. In order to promote this principle, the sexual harassment of students, faculty, and/or staff is strictly prohibited.

Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, request for sexual favors, or verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:

  1. Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly, a term or condition of an individual’s employment or, as a condition for a student’s grade, or as a condition of a student’s admission into continuation in, or graduation from the program. 
  2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment decisions affecting such individual, or as the basis of an academic decision affecting a student. 
  3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual’s work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working/education environment. (Modification of 1994 President’s Policy statement regarding Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Program University of Central Florida.

When this policy is not specific on a certain point, faculty members and field staff are expected, in good faith, to conduct their activities in the spirit of social responsibility embodied in this policy.

Matriculation Policy

If a student does not complete at least one class in the semester in which they were accepted into the MSW Program they will be discontinued from the program unless the student has extenuating circumstances and has consulted with the MSW Coordinator prior to the end of the semester.

MSW Student Advancement Polciy

Advancement Requirements:To be accepted into and retained in the program, students are expected to demonstrate initiative, dependability, social concern, self-awareness, appreciation for diversity in others, problem solving ability, ease in relating with others, skill in writing and speaking, tolerance of diversity, and professional ethics. Advancement from one semester to the next is contingent upon satisfactory progress each semester. The student must maintain satisfactory progress toward meeting the following expectations.

Academic Performance: 

Students are required to maintain a 3.0 GPA and satisfactory performance in non-letter graded courses.

If a student’s GPA drops below 3.0, the student will be reverted to a probationary status by the UCF Graduate School.  The student will be dismissed from the program if the GPA does not rise to a 3.0 within 9 credit hours (does not include field seminar credit hours).

If a student’s GPA drops below a 2.0, the student will be dismissed from the program by the UCF Graduate School.

A student who receives more than six (6) hours of “C” (C, C+ or C-) or lower will be discontinued from the MSW Program.

Students earning an F grade in any of their course work will be dismissed from the Master of Social Work program.

Students earning one “D” (D+, D, or D-) grade will be placed on probation and the student will be required to repeat the course and a grade of “B” (B or B+) or “A” (A- or A) must be achieved. It is important to note, grade forgiveness or grade replacement is not permitted on the graduate level. The original grade is still counted in the student’s overall grade point average.

Students earning two or more “D” (D+, D, or D-) grades will be dismissed from the Master of Social Work program. 

Students MUST successfully complete all generalist level classes and generalist field placement to move into the clinical year(s) of the program.  If a student earns a D (D-, D or D+) in a course taken during the generalist year, they will not be permitted to move on to their clinical year courses or clinical field placement.  If a student does not enroll in or complete (withdrawals) from a generalist class they will not be permitted to move on to their clinical year courses until the class has been completed. Students who have an “I” grade in any generalist course must complete the required work before beginning clinical year courses or field placement.

Students earning a U in their field placement/field seminar course will be dismissed from the Master of Social Work program.  (Further information can be found under the field placement information on page #13 )  

Professional Behavior - The Student is expected to:

Obtain, analyze data, integrate information and reach sound assessment judgments.

Implement effective interventions.

Relate in a positive manner with client system, colleagues, agency staff, and community systems.

Demonstrate a commitment to and skill in self-evaluation of practice.

Respond to evaluation and criticism with appropriate professional behavior in the classroom and in the internship environment.

Refrain from performance that jeopardizes safety of clientsin field placement.

Manifest a physical or emotional condition of a nature that affects, or is affected by, one’s performance in the classroom and the field placement site.

Meets attendance requirements and completes expected number of field hours throughout the field placement.

C. Ethical Conduct - The student is expected to:

Demonstrate honesty and integrity in all aspects of the program.

Adhere to ethical professional standards in all interactions with clients, peers, faculty, field instructors, and all members of the University and practice communities.

Demonstrate law abiding behavior that will not interfere with obtaining a license in the State of Florida to practice Social Work. This includes, but is not limited to, conviction in this state or any other state of a crime that is a felony; conviction of a felony in a federal court; or conviction of a misdemeanor which involves family violence (whether against an adult or child).

The standards of ethical behavior are outlined by the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics. This includes, but is not limited to, sexual or racial harassment or harassment concerning sexual orientation; threatening behavior; plagiarism; theft; or sexual misconduct. This includes all behaviors related to the status of the student in the School of Social Work, interactions with clients, agency staff, faculty, Departmental and University staff, and students.

Advancement Process

The Advancement Process assures that each student maintains adequate progress in gaining knowledge, skills, and competencies required for graduation and professional practice.

A. The student automatically advances and should consider him/herself advanced unless informed otherwise.

B. Faculty Concerns

Whenever a student is not making satisfactory progress toward a degree, as indicated by receiving a “C” (C+, C or C-) in MSW courses, the MSW Program Coordinator will notify the student and the MSW Advising Coordinator. The notification will be in writing and specify the concern.

Whenever a student is not making satisfactory progress toward a degree, as indicated by receiving a “D” (D+, D, D-) or “F”, the student may be dismissed from the MSW Program.

Students MUST successfully complete all generalist level classes and generalist field placement to move into the clinical year(s) of the program.  If a student earns a D (D-, D or D+) in a course taken during the generalist year, they will not be permitted to move on to their clinical year courses or clinical field placement.  If a student does not enroll in or complete (withdrawals) from a generalist class they will not be permitted to move on to their clinical year courses until the class has been completed. Students who have an “I” grade in any generalist course must complete the required work before beginning clinical year courses or field placement.

Students whose graduate status GPA falls below 2.0 will be dismissed from the degree program. Additionally, students whose graduate status GPA drops below 3.0 but above 2.0 will be placed on academic probation by the College of Graduate Studies for a maximum of nine semester hours of letter-graded course work (Grades A-F). If the student has not attained a graduate status GPA of 3.0 of graded course work at the end of the probationary nine semester hours, he/she will be dismissed from the graduate program. The College of Graduate Studies notifies the student in writing.  

Whenever a faculty member has a concern regarding a student’s academic performance, professional behavior, or ethical conduct that cannot be satisfactorily resolved, the faculty member will notify the MSW Program Coordinator in writing. The MSW Program Coordinator will convene the MSW Committee to review the concern.

The student, MSW Program Coordinator, the MSW Advising Coordinator, and the Field Education Coordinator (when appropriate) will meet and develop a plan which specifies the actions the student will take to achieve the desired level of skill, knowledge, or competency and the time frame during which it will be achieved. A copy of the agreement, signed by the student, the MSW Program Coordinator, and the Field Education Coordinator (when appropriate) will be placed in the student’s file. Should the student fail to meet the specified agreed upon level of skill, knowledge, and competency by the specified time, a recommendation will be made to the Director of the School of Social Work to dismiss the student. The Director will notify the student of his/her decision in writing.

The student may appeal the decision as outlined in The UCF Golden Rule.

Please see the MSW Field Manual for specific field advancement policies.

MSW Program Grievance Procedures

Purpose: For the benefit of both faculty and students as well as for providing a formal communication channel for students who feel they have been unfairly treated, the School of Social Work has a formal procedure for student grievance. This procedure should be followed only when students are attempting to resolve complaints against a social work faculty member in the School of Social Work. Grievances regarding other than social work faculty should be handled by college and/or university grievance committees.

Issues Covered: This document pertains to all student-faculty grievances with the exception of complaints about the professional judgment exercised by an instructor in assigning a grade. However, under the following circumstances a student may grieve a grading issue:

  1. Grades resulting in deviations from the instructor’s established and announced grading procedures.
  2. Errors in application of grading procedures.
  3. Lowering of grades as retaliation for non-academic matters.

Procedures for Student Grievance:

It is the school policy to encourage the informal resolu­tion of grievances directly between the student and the faculty member. If this cannot be accomplished, the student is encouraged to continue resolution by presenting the problem in writing or orally through appropriate procedures. The appropriate procedures for student grievances within the School require that any student or student representative having a complaint must:

  1. Discuss the problem with the faculty member involved unless the student perceives that this will place the student in jeopardy. He/she may then seek advice from a faculty member of his/her choice. At this stage, or at any other step in the grievance procedure, a student is free to consult his/her faculty advisor for advice in resolving the problem.
  2. If the grievance is not resolved in Step 1, the student will then refer to The Golden Rule Section 4. The Golden Rule 4.2 Grievance Procedures are located at the following website: goldenrule.sdes.ucf.edu/docs/goldenrule.pdf (page 59).

Outside Employment

Graduate social work education is both difficult and time consuming; a typical full-time student’s week includes twelve (12) hours in the classroom, twenty-four (24) in outside preparation for classes (readings, etc.), and approximately fifteen (15) hours of internship. Outside employment adds to an already demanding workload. The faculty caution students in seeking or maintaining outside employment.

Criminal Charges while in the MSW Program

Prior to entering the MSW Program students are asked to disclose information regarding a criminal history including felony and misdemeanor offenses that include convictions or current charges. While in the MSW Program students arrested for a misdemeanor or felony offense must notify the MSW Program Coordinator immediately. Students who report an arrest will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct.  Students may be asked to provide documentation from the legal system that outlines the offenses with which they have been charged.  In addition, when appropriate students will provide supporting documentation (e.g. date of conviction, court mandated programs). 

While criminal action is pending against a student, the student will not be allowed to enter into a field placement or continue in an existing placement if the nature of the offenses relates to their ability to practice social work. The MSW Program Coordinator, Field Placement Coordinator, and Director of the School of Social Work will meet to review the criminal action pending in order to determine if the student will be removed from the field placement site. Once the criminal action is resolved the MSW Program Coordinator, Field Placement coordinator in consultation with the Director of the School of Social Work will determine the student’s continuance in the MSW Program.

Upon disposition of the criminal action students will produce evidence from the court to the MSW Program Coordinator. If a student is convicted of a crime the MSW Coordinator may recommend dismissal from the MSW Program to the Director of the School of Social Work.  Each case will be reviewed individually to determine the severity of the crime and implications of the conviction that may affected the student’s fitness to practice social work.

If upon review of the relevant documentation, it appears that a student has misrepresented the status of pending charges, a prior conviction of a misdemeanor or felony offense to the MSW Program faculty or staff, the student will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct and may be dismissed from the MSW Program depending on the severity and nature of the pending charges or the prior conviction.

Graduation

Graduation is the culmination of a challenging journey in the pursuit of a higher degree. As students approach the end of their graduate career, there is some important information and several deadlines that should be noted to help the process go smoothly. Below are general guidelines for the graduation process in the College of Health and Public Affairs. For complete policies, degree and graduation requirements, students should refer to the UCF Graduate Catalog and the “Degree Requirements” section of this handbook.

Before Filing an Intent to Graduate

  • Students are encouraged to review their Graduate Plan of Study in myUCF to ensure everything is correct.
  • If approval has been granted to take courses that are not part of the regular degree requirements, the substitutions should appear on the academic audit. If not, the student should contact the MSW Advisor to request course substitution paperwork.
  • Students should register for all remaining classes before submitting the Intent form.
  • Students must be registered at UCF during the semester they graduate.

Where and How to File an Intent to Graduate

Students who intend to graduate must complete the online Intent to Graduate Form by logging into myUCF and navigating to the Student Center – Academics > Undergraduate and Graduate Careers > Intent to Graduate: Apply. Once the online form is completed, students will receive e-mail communications from the College of Graduate Studies at various stages of the review process. Students can also log in to myUCF and check the status of their Intent to Graduate at any time by navigating to the Student Center - Intent to Graduate:Status.

When to File Intent to Graduate

The Intent to Graduate is due by the end of the first week of class of the student’s graduating (final) semester. Students should plan to file their Intent between finals week of their next to last semester and the first week of class of their last semester.

Information about Commencement

The UCF Registrar’s Office website www.registrar.ucf.edu includes important information about commencement, including schedules, how to get tickets and how to order a cap and gown.

Certificate Students

Students who are pursuing a certificate, must have applied to and been admitted to the certificate program and must submit a Certificate Completion form to the School of Social Work. Certificates are separate, independent programs and separate diplomas are issued for them. The certificate curriculum should be followed exactly as it is outlined in the “Requirements” section of the UCF Graduate Catalog for the particular certificate. Any course exceptions or “substitutions” for certificate programs must be appealed using the university Appeals process. See “Appeals” under the General Policies section for details of when and how to file an appeal. The appeals process takes approximately two months to complete. Substitutions for required courses in Certificates should be approved PRIOR to the student taking the course. However, in cases where the appeal was not approved prior to completion of the course, the appeal for certificate substitutions should be filed no later than the first week of the student’s final semester.

Licensing Information

The State of Florida and other states typically have licensing of social workers with an MSW. In order to obtain your license in the State of Florida you will need to complete the necessary paperwork, carry out clinical social work practice and be supervised following graduation for two years by someone authorized to do so in the State of Florida, and pass an exam. You should request information from the Florida Board of Clinical Social Work, Marriage and Family Therapy & Mental Health Counseling at 850-488-0595 or you can go to their website at: www.doh.state.fl.us.

Please email the MSW Program Assistant to request a letter from the School of Social Work once you have graduated. Please include the following information.

  1. Your PID number (or birth date if you do not remember):
  2. Your name when you graduated from the MSW program (please include middle initial): 
  3. Date when your MSW degree was awarded: 
  4. Agency information where you completed your field internship during the clinical year of your MSW: 
  5. ADVANCE STANDING STUDENTS ONLY: If you received a BSW degree, name of university and date BSW degree was awarded: 
  6. Your application file number (if you have it):
The letter sent by the School to the Florida board will indicate the nature of your second year field placement (agency and hours). For licensing requirements in other states, you will need to contact the relevant office in that state.

It is essential that you save your syllabi and graduate catalog for documentation of your course work

Quote from the Education Worksheet Clinical Social Work Application packet: “General Information: You are required to complete 24 semester hours or 37 quarter hours of graduate level coursework in theory of human behavior and practice methods as courses clinical oriented services within a school of social work at an accredited college or university.

Do NOT list field work. Course numbers and titles should be listed as they appear on your official transcripts. You must submit a course description photocopied from a school catalog or a course syllabus for all courses listed below."

Listed below are the Human Behavior and Practice Method courses. 

School Course Number Course Title*Credit Hours
UCFSOW 5105Human Behavior I3
UCFSOW 5106Human Behavior II3
UCFSOW 5132Diverse Client Populations3
UCFSOW 5305Social Work Practice I3
UCFSOW 5306Social Work Practice II3
UCFSOW 6123Psychosocial Pathology3
UCFSOW 6348Practice with Individuals3
UCFSOW 6612Practice with Families3
UCFSOW 6324Practice with Groups3
UCFSOW XXXXElective3
  Total Hours30-33

*Must be listed as on your transcript

Curriculum


Track Curriculum: Online Part-Time

The MSW program requires 62 credit hours, including 39 credit hours of required core and advanced clinical specialization courses. In addition, students complete 9 credit hours of electives and 14 credit hours of field experience. Students in the program must include at least 31 credit hours of course work at the 6000 level in their program of study.

Educational standards for all social work programs are established by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the national accreditation body for professional social work education. Curriculum direction and content is regulated by the CSWE through its accreditation standards. The MSW program at UCF is fully accredited through CSWE.



Prerequisites

Introductory three-credit college-level courses inthe following areas or equivalents with a grade of C or better are required for admission into the program from the following areas: Biology with human content, English or Communication, Introduction to Psychology, Statistics, Introduction to Sociology, and Cultural Diversity.

Required Courses—39 Credit Hours

Core—21 Credit Hours

The core provides the foundation curriculum for the generalist Social Work practice.

  • SOW 5105 Human Behavior and Social Environment I: Individual (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5106 Human Behavior and Social Environment II: Social Systems (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5132 Diverse Client Populations (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5235 Social Welfare Policies and Services (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5305 Social Work Practice I: Generalist Practice (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5306 Social Work Practice II: Intervention Approaches (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5404 Social Work Research (3 credit hours)

Clinical Specialization—18 Credit Hours

  • SOW 6123 Psychosocial Pathology (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6246 Policy Analysis and Social Change (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6324 Clinical Practice with Groups (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6348 Clinical Practice with Individuals (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6612 Clinical Practice with Families (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6424 Theories for Evidence-Based Clinical Practice in Social Work (3 credit hours)

Electives—9 Credit Hours

One elective is required as a component of the foundation curriculum and two clinical electives are required as components of the clinical specialization. Students in the online track will take clinical electives for all three required MSW electives.

Approved electives:

  • SOW 6603 Clinical Social Work Practice in Health Settings (Clinical)
  • SOW 6604 Medications in Social Work Practice (Advanced Clinical)
  • SOW 6806 Behavioral Health Skills in Social Work (Clinical)
  • SOW 6652 Children Services in Social Work (Clinical)
  • SOW 6655 Child Abuse: Treatment and Prevention (Clinical)

Field Experience—14 Credit Hours

  • Generalist Field Education and Seminars (6 credit hours)
  • Clinical field Education and Seminars (8 credit hours)

Field instruction is an integral part of graduate social work education. It provides the student with an opportunity to test classroom knowledge as well as to develop and refine foundation and advanced practice skills. Decisions regarding field assignment are determined by the Field Director. Only agency sites approved by the School of Social Work may be used for field instruction. Generalist MSW students complete a minimum of 400 hours in the field; clinical MSW students complete a minimum of 600 clock hours in the field. Field education includes a field seminar.

Please be aware, evening (after 5pm) and weekend placements are extremely limited. The School of Social Work is under no obligation to provide such placements. Consequently, field placements cannot be guaranteed to students who require evening and weekend placements. Students must complete at least 50% of their field hours during the agency’s normal business hours. 

Required Sequence of Curriculum

 First Semester

  • Term 1.1 - SOW 5105 Human Behavior I: Individual
  • Term 1.2 - SOW 5132 Diverse Client Populations

Second Semester

  • Term 2.1 - SOW 5106 Human Behavior II: Systems
  • Term 2.2 - SOW 5235 Social Welfare Policies

Third Semester

  • Term 3.1 - SOW 5305 Social Work Practice I
  • Term 3.2 - SOW 6712 Clinical Social Work with Substance Abuse/Addiction

Fourth Semester

  • Full semester - SOW 5565 PT MSW Generalist Field/Seminar I
  • Term 4.1 - SOW 5306 Social Work Practice II
  • Term 4.2 - SOW 5404 Social Work Research

Fifth Semester

  • Full semester - SOW 5566 PT MSW Generalist Field/Seminar II
  • Term 5.1 - SOW 6806 Behavioral Health Skills (Elective)
  • Term 5.2 - SOW 6246 Policy Analysis Social Change

Sixth Semester

  • Full semester - SOW 5567 PT MSW Generalist Field/Seminar III
  • Term 6.1 - SOW 6123 Psychosocial Pathology
  • Term 6.2 - SOW 6424 Theories for Evidence-based Clinical Social Work Practice

Seventh Semester

  • Full semester - SOW 6561 PT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar I 
  • Term 7.1 - SOW 6348 Practice with Individuals
  • Term 7.2 - SOW 6612 Practice with Families

Eighth Semester

  • Full semester - SOW 6563 PT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar III
  • Term 8.1 - SOW 6324 Practice with Groups
  • Term 8.2 - SOW 6604 Medications in Social Work Practice (Elective)

Ninth Semester

  • Full semester - SOW 6562 PT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar II 

Transfer Credit

Academic credit for life experience and previous work experience shall not be given, in whole or in part, in lieu of Social Work courses required to fulfill degree requirements.

Due to the cohort nature of the track, transfer credits will not be accepted for the Online MSW track.

Equipment Fee

Full-time students in the MSW program pay a $35 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled. Part-time students pay $17.50 per semester.

Cost Per Credit Hour

For the Online Part-Time Social Work track in the Social Work MSW program, the cost per credit hour is $487.45.*

*Includes all university fees, which may be subject to change.


Track Curriculum: Online Part-Time Advanced Standing

The 32-hour MSW program is composed of 18 credit hours of required core and advanced clinical specialization courses. In addition, students complete 6 credit hours of electives and 8 credit hours of field experience. Independent learning is demonstrated throughout the curriculum through the process of inquiry and dialogue. Projects such as research studies, clinical assessments and treatment plans, papers and internships also contribute to the self-development of our students.

Educational standards for all social work programs are established by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the national accreditation body for professional social work education. Curriculum direction and content is regulated by the CSWE through its accreditation standards. The MSW program at UCF is fully accredited through CSWE. 

Prerequisites 

Introductory three-credit college-level courses with a grade of "C" or better in the following areas or equivalents are required for admission into the program from the following areas: Biology with human content, English or Communication, Introduction of Psychology, Statistics, Introduction of Sociology, and Cultural Diversity.

Required Courses—18 Credit Hours

Clinical Specialization—18 Credit Hours

  • SOW 6123 Psychosocial Pathology (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6246 Policy Analysis and Social Change (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6324 Clinical Practice with Groups (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6348 Clinical Practice with Individuals (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6612 Clinical Practice with Families (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6424 Theories for Evidence-Based Clinical Practice in Social Work (3 credit hours)

Electives—6 Credit Hours

Two clinical electives are required as components of the clinical specialization. They are selected in consultation with adviser and Online MSW coordinator.

  • Clinical elective (3 credit hours)
  • Clinical elective (3 credit hours)

Field Experience—8 Credit Hours

  • Clinical Field Education and Seminars (8 credit hours)

Field instruction is an integral part of graduate social work education. It provides the student with an opportunity to test classroom knowledge as well as to develop and refine foundation and advanced practice skills. Decisions regarding field assignment are determined by the Field Director. Only agency sites approved by the School of Social Work may be used for field instruction. Clinical MSW students complete a minimum of 600 clock hours in the field. Field education includes a field seminar.

Students must complete at least 50 percent of their field hours during the agency’s normal business hours. Evening (after 5 p.m.) and weekend placements are extremely limited. The School of Social Work is under no obligation to provide such placements. Consequently, field placements cannot be guaranteed to students who require evening and weekend placements.

Required Sequence of Curriculum

First Semester (Spring)
  • SOW 6123 Psychosocial Pathology
  • SOW 6424 Theories for Evidence-Based Clinical Social Work Practice
Second Semester (Summer)
  • SOW 6348 Practice with Individuals
  • SOW 6612 Practice with Families
  • SOW 6561 PT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar I
Third Semester (Fall)
  • SOW 6324 Practice with Groups
  • SOW 6604 Medications in Social Work Practice*
  • SOW 6562 PT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar II
Fourth Semester (Spring)
  • SOW 6246 Policy Analysis and Social Change
  • SOW 6806 Behavioral Health Skills*
  • SOW 6563 PT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar III

*Alternative elective options may be available in future semesters. Please contact the adviser for additional information.

Transfer Credit

Academic credit for life experience and previous work experience shall not be given, in whole or in part, in lieu of Social Work courses required to fulfill degree requirements.

Students who have completed course work in an accredited MSW program may transfer up to 30 credit hours toward the 62 credit hours of the degree. Students must have received a grade of “B-” or higher in these courses. Courses will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the MSW Coordinator. Field courses will be evaluated by the Coordinator for Field Education. Students seeking to transfer to the School of Social Work from another CSWE-accredited social work program are required to meet the criteria for admission and follow the application procedures. Additionally, one of the academic references must be from the MSW Program Coordinator or academic adviser in the program from which the applicant is transferring and must address the academic standing in that program. If not currently enrolled, the reference must be from the former MSW Program Coordinator or academic adviser. Syllabi are required for any social work classes being considered for transfer.

Due to the cohort nature of the track, additional transfer credits beyond the 30 listed above will not be accepted for the Online MSW track.

Equipment Fee

Full-time students in the MSW program pay a $35 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled. Part-time students pay $17.50 per semester.

Cost Per Credit Hour

For the Online MSW Part-Time Advanced Standing track, the cost per credit hour is $487.45.*

*Includes all university fees, which may be subject to change.


Track Curriculum: Orlando Full-Time

The 62-hour MSW program is composed of 39 credit hours of required core and advanced clinical specialization courses. In addition, students complete 9 credit hours of electives and 14 credit hours of field experience. Independent learning is demonstrated throughout the curriculum through the process of inquiry and dialogue. Projects such as research studies, clinical assessments and treatment plans, papers and internships also contribute to the self-development of our students. Students in the 62-hour program must include at least 31 hours of course work at the 6000 level in their program of study.

Educational standards for all social work programs are established by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the national accreditation body for professional social work education. Curriculum direction and content is regulated by the CSWE through its accreditation standards. The MSW program at UCF is fully accredited through CSWE.

Prerequisites

Introductory three-credit college-level courses with a grade of "C" or better in the following areas or equivalents are required for admission into the program from the following areas: Biology with human content, English or Communication, Introduction of Psychology, Statistics, Introduction of Sociology, and Cultural Diversity.

Required Courses—39 Credit Hours

Core—21 Credit Hours

The core provides the foundation curriculum for the generalist Social Work practice.

  • SOW 5105 Human Behavior and Social Environment I: Individual (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5106 Human Behavior and Social Environment II: Social Systems (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5132 Diverse Client Populations (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5235 Social Welfare Policies and Services (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5305 Social Work Practice I: Generalist Practice (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5306 Social Work Practice II: Intervention Approaches (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5404 Social Work Research (3 credit hours)

Clinical Specialization—18 Credit Hours

  • SOW 6123 Psychosocial Pathology (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6246 Policy Analysis and Social Change (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6324 Clinical Practice with Groups (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6348 Clinical Practice with Individuals (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6612 Clinical Practice with Families (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6424 Theories for Evidence-Based Clinical Practice in Social Work (3 credit hours)

Electives—9 Credit Hours

One elective is required as a component of the foundation curriculum and two clinical electives are required as components of the clinical specialization. Students may choose to take clinical electives for all three required MSW electives.

  • Practice/Non-clinical Elective (3 credit hours)
  • Clinical elective (3 credit hours)
  • Clinical elective (3 credit hours)

Approved electives:

  • SOW 5149 Military and Veteran Culture with Historical Framework (Practice/Non-clinical)
  • SOW 6109 Violence Against Women: A Global Perspective (Clinical)
  • SOW 6155 Human Sexuality in Social Work Practice (Clinical)
  • SOW 6383 Social Work Administration (Practice/Non-clinical)
  • SOW 6603 Clinical Social Work Practice in Health Settings (Clinical)
  • SOW 6604 Medications in Social Work Practice (Advanced Clinical)
  • SOW 6608 Understanding and Managing Combat Related Behavioral and Mental Health Disorders (Clinical) 
  • SOW 6610 Clinical Practice with Military and Veteran Families (Clinical)
  • SOW 6635 Social Work Practice in Schools (Clinical)
  • SOW 6644 Interventions with Older Adults and Their Families (Clinical)
  • SOW 6652 Children Services in Social Work (Clinical)
  • SOW 6655 Child Abuse: Treatment and Prevention (Clinical)
  • SOW 6670 Clinical Social Work Practice with LGBTQ+ (Advanced Clinical)
  • SOW 6712 Clinical Social Work Practice with Substance Addictions (Clinical)
  • SOW 6713 Prevention and Treatment of Adolescent Substance Use and Misuse (Clinical)
  • SOW 6726 Social Work Practice with Children from Birth to Age Five and Their Families (Clinical)
  • SOW 6727 Core Concepts of Child and Adolescent Trauma (Clinical)
  • SOW 6735 Documentation Skills for Helping Professionals (Clinical)
  • SOW 6756 Forensic Social Work (Clinical)
  • SOW 6846 Spirituality in Clinical Social Work Practice (Clinical)
  • SOW 6914 Integrative Research Project in Clinical Practice (Non-clinical)

Field Experience—14 Credit Hours

  • Generalist Field Education and Seminars (6 credit hours)
  • Clinical Field Education and Seminars (8 credit hours)

Field instruction is an integral part of graduate social work education. It provides the student with an opportunity to test classroom knowledge as well as to develop and refine foundation and advanced practice skills. Decisions regarding field assignment are determined by the Field Director. Only agency sites approved by the School of Social Work may be used for field instruction. Generalist MSW students complete a minimum of 400 hours in the field; clinical MSW students complete a minimum of 600 clock hours in the field. Field education includes a field seminar.

Students must complete at least 50% of their field hours during the agency’s normal business hours. Evening (after 5 p.m.) and weekend placements are extremely limited. The School of Social Work is under no obligation to provide such placements. Consequently, field placements cannot be guaranteed to students who require evening and weekend placements.

Required Sequence of Curriculum

First Semester (Fall)
  • SOW 5105 Human Behavior I: Individual
  • SOW 5132 Diverse Client Populations
  • SOW 5305 Social Work Practice I
  • SOW 5404 Social Work Research
  • SOW 5538 FT MSW Generalist Field/Seminar I
Second Semester (Spring)
  • SOW 5106 Human Behavior II: Systems
  • SOW 5235 Social Welfare Policies
  • SOW 5306 Social Work Practice II
  • SOW Elective
  • SOW 5539 FT MSW Generalist Field/Seminar II
Third Semester (Summer)
  • SOW 6123 Psychosocial Pathology
  • SOW 6424 Theories for Evidence-based Clinical Social Work Practice
Fourth Semester (Fall)
  • SOW 6324 Clinical Practice with Groups
  • SOW 6348 Clinical Practice with Individuals
  • SOW 6612 Clinical Practice with Families
  • SOW 6531 FT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar
Fifth Semester (Spring)
  • SOW 6246 Policy Analysis Social Change
  • SOW Clinical elective
  • SOW Clinical elective
  • SOW 6536 FT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar II

Transfer Credit

Academic credit for life experience and previous work experience shall not be given, in whole or in part, in lieu of Social Work courses required to fulfill degree requirements.

Students who have completed course work in an accredited MSW program may transfer up to 30 credit hours toward the 62 credit hours of the degree. Students must have received a grade of “B-” or higher in these courses. Courses will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the MSW Coordinator. Field courses will be evaluated by the Coordinator for Field Education. Students seeking to transfer to the School of Social Work from another CSWE accredited social work program are required to meet the criteria for admission and follow the application procedures. Additionally, one of the academic references must be from the MSW Program Coordinator or academic adviser in the program from which the applicant is transferring and must address the academic standing in that program. If not currently enrolled, the reference must be from the former MSW Program Coordinator or academic adviser. Syllabi are required for any social work classes being considered for transfer.

Equipment Fee

Full-time students in the MSW program pay a $35 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled.


Track Curriculum: Orlando Full-Time Advanced Standing

The 32-hour MSW program is composed of 18 credit hours of required core and advanced clinical specialization courses. In addition, students complete 6 credit hours of electives and 8 credit hours of field experience. Independent learning is demonstrated throughout the curriculum through the process of inquiry and dialogue. Projects such as research studies, clinical assessments and treatment plans, papers and internships also contribute to the self-development of our students.

Previous baccalaureate course work that received at least a "B-" will be reviewed to ensure content equivalency. In advanced standing admission, a maximum of 30 foundation-level credits may be waived based on the content equivalency to meet foundation year MSW requirements, which consist of courses in human behavior and the social environment, policy, research, social work practice, and social work field placement.

Educational standards for all social work programs are established by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the national accreditation body for professional social work education. Curriculum direction and content is regulated by the CSWE through its accreditation standards. The MSW program at UCF is fully accredited through CSWE.



Educational standards for all social work programs are established by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the national accreditation body for professional social work education. Curriculum direction and content is regulated by the CSWE through its accreditation standards. The MSW program at UCF is fully accredited through CSWE.

Prerequisites

Introductory three-credit college-level courses with a grade of "C" or better in the following areas or equivalents are required for admission into the program from the following areas: Biology with human content, English or Communication, Introduction of Psychology, Statistics, Introduction of Sociology, and Cultural Diversity.

Required Courses—18 Credit Hours

Clinical Specialization—18 Credit Hours

  • SOW 6123 Psychosocial Pathology (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6246 Policy Analysis and Social Change (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6324 Clinical Practice with Groups (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6348 Clinical Practice with Individuals (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6612 Clinical Practice with Families (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6424 Theories for Evidence-Based Clinical Practice in Social Work (3 credit hours)

Electives—6 Credit Hours

Two clinical electives are required.

  • Clinical elective (3 credit hours)
  • Clinical elective (3 credit hours)

Approved clinical electives:

  • SOW 6109 Violence Against Women: A Global Perspective (Clinical)
  • SOW 6155 Human Sexuality in Social Work Practice (Clinical)
  • SOW 6603 Clinical Social Work Practice in Health Settings (Clinical)
  • SOW 6604 Medications in Social Work Practice (Advanced Clinical)
  • SOW 6608 Understanding and Managing Combat Related Behavioral and Mental Health Disorders (Clinical) 
  • SOW 6610 Clinical Practice with Military and Veteran Families (Clinical)
  • SOW 6635 Social Work Practice in Schools (Clinical)
  • SOW 6644 Interventions with Older Adults and Their Families (Clinical)
  • SOW 6652 Children Services in Social Work (Clinical)
  • SOW 6655 Child Abuse: Treatment and Prevention (Clinical)
  • SOW 6670 Clinical Social Work Practice with LGBTQ+  (Advanced Clinical)
  • SOW 6712 Clinical Social Work Practice with Substance Addictions (Clinical)
  • SOW 6713 Prevention and Treatment of Adolescent Substance Use and Misuse (Clinical)
  • SOW 6726 Social Work Practice with Children from Birth to Age Five and Their Families (Clinical)
  • SOW 6727 Core Concepts of Child and Adolescent Trauma (Clinical)
  • SOW 6735 Documentation Skills for Helping Professionals (Clinical)
  • SOW 6756 Forensic Social Work (Clinical)
  • SOW 6846 Spirituality in Clinical Social Work Practice (Clinical)

Field Experience—8 Credit Hours

  • Clinical Field Education and Seminars (8 credit hours)

Field instruction is an integral part of graduate social work education. It provides the student with an opportunity to test classroom knowledge as well as to develop and refine foundation and advanced practice skills. Decisions regarding field assignment are determined by the Field Director. Only agency sites approved by the School of Social Work may be used for field instruction. Clinical MSW students complete a minimum of 600 clock hours in the field. Field education includes a field seminar.

Students must complete at least 50% of their field hours during the agency’s normal business hours. Evening (after 5 p.m.) and weekend placements are extremely limited. The School of Social Work is under no obligation to provide such placements. Consequently, field placements cannot be guaranteed to students who require evening and weekend placements.

Required Sequence of Curriculum

First Semester (Summer)
  • SOW 6123 Psychosocial Pathology
  • SOW 6424 Theories for Evidence-Based Clinical Social Work Practice
Second Semester (Fall)
  • SOW 6324 Clinical Practice with Groups
  • SOW 6348 Clinical Practice with Individuals
  • SOW 6612 Clinical Practice with Families
  • SOW 6531 FT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar I
Third Semester (Spring)
  • SOW 6246 Policy Analysis and Social Change
  • SOW Clinical elective
  • SOW Clinical elective
  • SOW 6536 FT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar II

Transfer Credit

Academic credit for life experience and previous work experience shall not be given, in whole or in part, in lieu of Social Work courses required to fulfill degree requirements.

Students who have completed course work in an accredited MSW program may transfer up to 30 credit hours toward the 62 credit hours of the degree. Students must have received a grade of “B-” or higher in these courses. Courses will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the MSW Coordinator. Field courses will be evaluated by the Coordinator for Field Education. Students seeking to transfer to the School of Social Work from another CSWE accredited social work program are required to meet the criteria for admission and follow the application procedures. Additionally, one of the academic references must be from the MSW Program Coordinator or academic adviser in the program from which the applicant is transferring and must address the academic standing in that program. If not currently enrolled, the reference must be from the former MSW Program Coordinator or academic adviser. Syllabi are required for any social work classes being considered for transfer.

Equipment Fee

Full-time students in the MSW program pay a $35 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled.


Track Curriculum: Orlando Part-Time

The 62-hour MSW program is composed of 39 credit hours of required core and advanced clinical specialization courses. In addition, students complete 9 credit hours of electives and 14 credit hours of field experience. Independent learning is demonstrated throughout the curriculum through the process of inquiry and dialogue. Projects such as research studies, clinical assessments and treatment plans, papers and internships also contribute to the self-development of our students. Students in the 62-hour program must include at least 31 hours of course work at the 6000 level in their program of study.

Educational standards for all social work programs are established by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the national accreditation body for professional social work education. Curriculum direction and content is regulated by the CSWE through its accreditation standards. The MSW program at UCF is fully accredited through CSWE.



Prerequisites

Introoductory three-credit college-level courses with a grade of "C" or better in the following areas or equivalents are required for admission into the program from the following areas: Biology with human content, English or Communication, Introduction of Psychology, Statistics, Introduction of Sociology, and Cultural Diversity.

Required Courses—39 Credit Hours

Core—21 Credit Hours

The core provides the foundation curriculum for the generalist Social Work practice.>

  • SOW 5105 Human Behavior and Social Environment I: Individual (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5106 Human Behavior and Social Environment II: Social Systems (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5132 Diverse Client Populations (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5235 Social Welfare Policies and Services (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5305 Social Work Practice I: Generalist Practice (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5306 Social Work Practice II: Intervention Approaches (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5404 Social Work Research (3 credit hours)

Clinical Specialization—18 Credit Hours

  • SOW 6123 Psychosocial Pathology (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6246 Policy Analysis and Social Change (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6324 Clinical Practice with Groups (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6348 Clinical Practice with Individuals (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6612 Clinical Practice with Families (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6424 Theories for Evidence-Based Clinical Practice in Social Work (3 credit hours)

Electives—9 Credit Hours

One elective is required as a component of the foundation curriculum and two clinical electives are required as components of the clinical specialization. Students may choose to take clinical electives for all three required MSW electives.

  • Practice/Non-clinical Elective (3 credit hours)
  • Clinical elective (3 credit hours)
  • Clinical elective (3 credit hours)

Approved electives:

  • SOW 5149 Military and Veteran Culture with Historical Framework (Practice/Non-clinical)
  • SOW 6109 Violence Against Women: A Global Perspective (Clinical)
  • SOW 6155 Human Sexuality in Social Work Practice (Clinical)
  • SOW 6383 Social Work Administration (Practice/Non-clinical)
  • SOW 6603 Clinical Social Work Practice in Health Settings (Clinical)
  • SOW 6604 Medications in Social Work Practice (Advanced Clinical)
  • SOW 6608 Understanding and Managing Combat Related Behavioral and Mental Health Disorders Clinical)
  • SOW 6610 Clinical Practice with Military and Veteran Families Clinical)
  • SOW 6635 Social Work Practice in Schools (Clinical)
  • SOW 6644 Interventions with Older Adults and Their Families (Clinical)
  • SOW 6652 Children Services in Social Work (Clinical)
  • SOW 6655 Child Abuse: Treatment and Prevention (Clinical)
  • SOW 6670 Clinical Social Work Practice with LGBTQ+ (Advanced Clinical)
  • SOW 6712 Clinical Social Work Practice with Substance Addictions (Clinical)
  • SOW 6713 Prevention and Treatment of Adolescent Substance Use and Misuse (Clinical)
  • SOW 6726 Social Work Practice with Children from Birth to Age Five and Their Families (Clinical)
  • SOW 6727 Core Concepts of Child and Adolescent Trauma (Clinical)
  • SOW 6735 Documentation Skills for Helping Professionals (Clinical)
  • SOW 6756 Forensic Social Work (Clinical)
  • SOW 6846 Spirituality in Clinical Social Work Practice (Clinical)
  • SOW 6914 Integrative Research Project in Clinical Practice (Non-clinical)

Field Experience—14 Credit Hours

  • Generalist Field Education and Seminars (6 credit hours)
  • Clinical Field Education and Seminars (8 credit hours)

Field instruction is an integral part of graduate social work education. It provides the student with an opportunity to test classroom knowledge as well as to develop and refine foundation and advanced practice skills. Decisions regarding field assignment are determined by the Field Director. Only agency sites approved by the School of Social Work may be used for field instruction. Generalist MSW students complete a minimum of 400 hours in the field; clinical MSW students complete a minimum of 600 clock hours in the field. Field education includes a field seminar.

Students must complete at least 50% of their field hours during the agency’s normal business hours. Evening (after 5 p.m.) and weekend placements are extremely limited. The School of Social Work is under no obligation to provide such placements. Consequently, field placements cannot be guaranteed to students who require evening and weekend placements.

Required Sequence of Curriculum

First Semester (Fall)
  • SOW 5105 Human Behavior I: Individual
  • SOW 5132 Diverse Client Populations
Second Semester (Spring)
  • SOW 5106 Human Behavior II: Systems
  • SOW 5235 Social Welfare Policies
Third Semester (Summer)
  • SOW 5305 Social Work Practice I
  • SOW Practice / Non-clinical Elective
Fourth Semester (Fall)
  • SOW 5306 Social Work Practice II
  • SOW 5404 Social Work Research
  • SOW 5565 PT MSW Generalist Field/Seminar I
Fifth Semester (Spring)
  • SOW 5566 PT MSW Generalist Field/Seminar II
  • SOW 6246 Policy Analysis Social Change
  • SOW Clinical Elective
Sixth Semester (Summer)
  • SOW 5567 PT MSW Generalist Field/Seminar III
  • SOW 6424 Theories for Evidence-based Clinical Social Work Practice
  • SOW 6123 Psychosocial Pathology
Seventh Semester (Fall)
  • SOW 6348 Practice with Individuals
  • SOW 6612 Practice with Families
  • SOW 6561 PT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar I
Eighth Semester (Spring)
  • SOW 6324 Practice with Groups
  • SOW Clinical Elective
  • SOW 6563 PT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar III
Ninth Semester (Summer)
  • SOW 6562 PT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar II

Transfer Credit

Academic credit for life experience and previous work experience shall not be given, in whole or in part, in lieu of Social Work courses required to fulfill degree requirements.

Students who have completed course work in an accredited MSW program may transfer up to 30 credit hours toward the 62 credit hours of the degree. Students must have received a grade of “B-” or higher in these courses. Courses will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the MSW Coordinator.  Field courses will be evaluated by the Coordinator for Field Education. Students seeking to transfer to the School of Social Work from another CSWE accredited social work program are required to meet the criteria for admission and follow the application procedures. Additionally, one of the academic references must be from the MSW Program Coordinator or academic adviser in the program from which the applicant is transferring and must address the academic standing in that program. If not currently enrolled, the reference must be from the former MSW Program Coordinator or academic adviser. Syllabi are required for any social work classes being considered for transfer.


Track Curriculum: Orlando Part-Time Advanced Standing

The 32-hour MSW program is composed of 18 credit hours of required core and advanced clinical specialization courses. In addition, students complete 6 credit hours of electives and 8 credit hours of field experience. Independent learning is demonstrated throughout the curriculum through the process of inquiry and dialogue. Projects such as research studies, clinical assessments and treatment plans, papers and internships also contribute to the self-development of our students.

Educational standards for all social work programs are established by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the national accreditation body for professional social work education. Curriculum direction and content is regulated by the CSWE through its accreditation standards. The MSW program at UCF is fully accredited through CSWE. 

Prerequisites

Introductory three-credit college-level courses with a grade of "C" or better in the following areas or equivalents are required for admission into the program from the following areas: Biology with human content, English or Communication, Introduction of Psychology, Statistics, Introduction of Sociology, and Cultural Diversity. 

Required Courses—18 Credit Hours

Clinical Specialization—18 Credit Hours

  • SOW 6123 Psychosocial Pathology (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6246 Policy Analysis and Social Change (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6324 Clinical Practice with Groups (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6348 Clinical Practice with Individuals (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6612 Clinical Practice with Families (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6424 Theories for Evidence-Based Clinical Practice in Social Work (3 credit hours)

Electives—6 Credit Hours

Two clinical electives are required as components of the clinical specialization. They are selected in consultation with adviser and MSW graduate program director.

  • Clinical elective (3 credit hours)
  • Clinical elective (3 credit hours)

Approved clinical electives:

  • SOW 5149 Military and Veteran Culture with Historical Framework (Practice/Non-clinical)
  • SOW 6109 Violence Against Women: A Global Perspective (Clinical)
  • SOW 6155 Human Sexuality in Social Work Practice (Clinical)
  • SOW 6383 Social Work Administration (Practice/Non-clinical)
  • SOW 6603 Social Work in Health Settings (Clinical)
  • SOW 6604 Medications in Social Work Practice (Advanced Clinical)
  • SOW 6608 Understanding and Managing Combat Related Behavioral and Mental Health Disorders (Clinical)
  • SOW 6610 Clinical Practice with Military and Veteran Families (Clinical)
  • SOW 6635 Social Work Practice in Schools (Clinical)
  • SOW 6644 Interventions with Older Adults and Their Families (Clinical)
  • SOW 6652 Children Services in Social Work (Clinical)
  • SOW 6655 Child Abuse: Treatment and Prevention (Clinical)
  • SOW 6670 Clinical Social Work Practice with LGBTQ+ (Advanced Clinical)
  • SOW 6712 Clinical Social Work Practice with Substance Addictions (Clinical)
  • SOW 6713 Prevention and Treatment of Adolescent Substance Use and Misuse (Clinical)
  • SOW 6726 Social Work Practice with Children from Birth to Age Five and Their Families (Clinical)
  • SOW 6727 Core Concepts of Child and Adolescent Trauma Clinical)
  • SOW 6735 Documentation Skills for Helping Professionals (Clinical)
  • SOW 6756 Forensic Social Work (Clinical)
  • SOW 6846 Spirituality in Clinical Social Work Practice (Clinical)
  • SOW 6914 Integrative Research Project in Clinical Practice (Non-clinical)

Field Experience—8 Credit Hours

  • Clinical Field Education and Seminars (8 credit hours)

Field instruction is an integral part of graduate social work education. It provides the student with an opportunity to test classroom knowledge as well as to develop and refine foundation and advanced practice skills. Decisions regarding field assignment are determined by the Field Director. Only agency sites approved by the School of Social Work may be used for field instruction. Clinical MSW students complete a minimum of 600 clock hours in the field. Field education includes a field seminar.  

Students must complete at least 50% of their field hours during the agency’s normal business hours. Evening (after 5 p.m.) and weekend placements are extremely limited. The School of Social Work is under no obligation to provide such placements. Consequently, field placements cannot be guaranteed to students who require evening and weekend placements.

Required Sequence of Curriculum

First Semester (Summer) 
  • SOW 6123 Psychosocial Pathology
  • SOW 6424 Theories for Evidence-Based Clinical Social Work Practice
Second Semester (Fall) 
  • SOW 6348 Practice with Individuals
  • SOW 6612 Practice with Families
  • SOW 6561 PT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar I
Third Semester (Spring) 
  • SOW 6246 Policy Analysis and Social Change
  • SOW 6324 Practice with Groups
  • SOW 6562 PT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar II
Fourth Semester (Summer)
  • SOW Clinical elective
  • SOW Clinical elective
  • SOW 6563 PT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar III

Transfer Credit

Academic credit for life experience and previous work experience shall not be given, in whole or in part, in lieu of Social Work courses required to fulfill degree requirements. 

Students who have completed course work in an accredited MSW program may transfer up to 30 credit hours toward the 62 credit hours of the degree. Students must have received a grade of “B-” or higher in these courses. Courses will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the MSW Coordinator. Field courses will be evaluated by the Coordinator for Field Education. Students seeking to transfer to the School of Social Work from another CSWE accredited social work program are required to meet the criteria for admission and follow the application procedures. Additionally, one of the academic references must be from the MSW Program Coordinator or academic adviser in the program from which the applicant is transferring and must address the academic standing in that program. If not currently enrolled, the reference must be from the former MSW Program Coordinator or academic adviser. Syllabi are required for any social work classes being considered for transfer. 

Equipment Fee

Full-time students in the MSW program pay a $35 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled. 


Track Curriculum: Osceola Regional Campus



The 62-hour MSW program is composed of 39 credit hours of required core and advanced clinical specialization courses. In addition, students complete 9 credit hours of electives and 14 credit hours of field experience. Independent learning is demonstrated throughout the curriculum through the process of inquiry and dialogue. Projects such as research studies, clinical assessments and treatment plans, papers and internships also contribute to the self-development of our students. Students in the 62-hour program must include at least 31 hours of course work at the 6000 level in their program of study.

Prerequisites

Introductory three-credit college-level courses in the following areas or equivalents are required for admission into the program from the following areas: Biology with human content, English or Communication, Psychology, Statistics, Sociology, and Diversity.

Required Courses—39 Credit Hours

Core—21 Credit Hours

The core provides the foundation curriculum for the generalist Social Work practice.

  • SOW 5105 Human Behavior and Social Environment I: Individual (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5106 Human Behavior and Social Environment II: Social Systems (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5132 Diverse Client Populations (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5235 Social Welfare Policies and Services (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5305 Social Work Practice I: Generalist Practice (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5306 Social Work Practice II: Intervention Approaches (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 5404 Social Work Research (3 credit hours)

Clinical Specialization—18 Credit Hours

  • SOW 6123 Psychosocial Pathology (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6246 Policy Analysis and Social Change (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6324 Clinical Practice with Groups (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6348 Clinical Practice with Individuals (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6612 Clinical Practice with Families (3 credit hours)
  • SOW 6424 Theories for Evidence-Based Clinical Practice in Social Work (3 credit hours)

Electives—9 Credit Hours

A practice elective is required as a component of the foundation curriculum and two clinical electives are required as components of the clinical specialization. Students may choose to take clinical electives for all three required MSW electives.

  • Practice/Non-clinical elective (3 credit hours) 
  • Clinical elective (3 credit hours)
  • Clinical elective (3 credit hours)

An approved general elective can be selected from list below:

  • SOW 5149 Military and Veteran Culture Historical Framework (Practice/Non-clinical)
  • SOW 6109 Violence Against Women: A Global Perspective (Clinical)
  • SOW 6155 Human Sexuality in Social Work Practice (Clinical)
  • SOW 6383 Social Work Administration (Practice/Non-clinical)
  • SOW 6603 Social Work in Health Settings (Clinical)
  • SOW 6604 Medications in Social Work Practice (Advanced Clinical)
  • SOW 6635 Social Work Practice in Schools (Clinical)
  • SOW 6644 Interventions with Older Adults and Their Families (Clinical)
  • SOW 6652 Children Services in Social Work (Clinical)
  • SOW 6655 Child Abuse: Treatment and Prevention (Clinical)
  • SOW 6670 Clinical Social Work Practice with LGBTQ+ (Advanced Clinical)
  • SOW 6712 Clinical Social Work Practice with Substance Addictions (Clinical)
  • SOW 6713 Prevention and Treatment of Adolescent Substance Use and Misuse (Clinical)
  • SOW 6726 Social Work Practice with Children from Birth to Age Five and Their Families (Clinical)
  • SOW 6756 Forensic Social Work (Clinical)
  • SOW 6846 Spirituality in Clinical Social Work Practice (Clinical)

Field Experience—14 Credit Hours

  • Generalist Field Education and Seminars (6 credit hours)
  • Clinical Field Education and Seminars (8 credit hours)

Required Sequence of Curriculum

First Semester (Fall)
  • SOW 5105 Human Behavior I: Individual
  • SOW 5132 Diverse Client Populations
Second Semester (Spring)
  • SOW 5106 Human Behavior II: Systems
  • SOW 5235 Social Welfare Policies 
Third Semester (Summer)
  • SOW 5305 Social Work Practice I
  • SOW Practice/Non-clinical Elective
Fourth Semester (Fall)
  • SOW 5306 Social Work Practice II
  • SOW 5404 Social Work Research
  • SOW 5565 PT MSW Generalist Field/Seminar I
Fifth Semester (Spring)
  • SOW 5566 PT MSW Generalist Field/Seminar II
  • SOW 6246 Policy Analysis and Social Change
  • SOW Clinical Elective
Sixth Semester (Summer)
  • SOW 5567 PT MSW Generalist Field/Seminar III
  • SOW 6424 Theories for Evidence-based Clinical Social Work Practice
  • SOW 6123 Psychosocial Pathology
Seventh Semester (Fall)
  • SOW 6348 Practice with Individuals
  • SOW 6612 Practice with Families
  • SOW 6561 PT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar I 
Eighth Semester (Spring)
  • SOW 6562 PT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar II
  • SOW 6324 Practice with Groups
  • SOW Clinical Elective
Ninth Semester (Summer)
  • SOW 6563 PT MSW Clinical Field/Seminar III 

Transfer Credit

Students who have completed course work in an accredited MSW program may transfer up to 30 credit hours toward the 62 credit hours of the degree. Students must have received a grade of “B-” or higher in these courses. Courses will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the MSW Coordinator.  Field courses will be evaluated by the Coordinator for Field Education. Students seeking to transfer to the School of Social Work from another CSWE accredited social work program are required to meet the criteria for admission and follow the application procedures. Additionally, one of the academic references must be from the MSW Program Coordinator or academic advisor in the program from which the applicant is transferring and must address the academic standing in that program. If not currently enrolled, the reference must be from the former MSW Program Coordinator or academic advisor. Syllabi for any social work classes you wish to transfer will be required for review.

Equipment Fee

Full-time students in the MSW program pay a $35 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled. Part-time students pay $17.50 per semester.


Timeline for Completion

The specific timeline for completion of your degree plan varies depending on whether students are Full-time or Part-time or Admitted to the Advanced Standing or Regular Degree program. Fifty percent of courses must be at the 6000 level.

All degree requirements must be met within six years from beginning the program.

NOTE: Required courses are typically offered only in the semester indicated. Students are required to take two (2) clinical electives to be eligible for licensure in the state of Florida.

*Please see the graduate programs section of the graduate catalog for official program track specific schedules of courses for each MSW program track listed in the sequence and semesters they are required to be taken. There will be no substitutions or changes in the order that classes are taken. Discussion with your advisor is required if there is a mitigating circumstance that may require a change in your course plan.

Graduate Research

UCF has three fundamental responsibilities with regard to graduate student research. They are to (1) support an academic environment that stimulates the spirit of inquiry, (2) develop the intellectual property stemming from research, and (3) disseminate the intellectual property to the general public. Students are responsible for being informed of rules, regulations and policies pertaining to research. Below are some general policies and resources.

Research Policies and Ethics Information: UCF's Office of Research & Commercialization ensures the UCF community complies with local, state and federal regulations that relate to research. For polices including required Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval when conducting research involving human subjects (e.g. surveys), animal research, conflict of interest and general responsible conduct of research, please see their website: www.research.ucf.edu > Compliance.

UCF’s Patent and Invention Policy: In most cases, UCF owns the intellectual property developed using university resources. The graduate student as inventor will according to this policy share in the proceeds of the invention. Please see the current UCF Graduate Catalog for details: www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu  > Policies > General Graduate Policies.
Research Coursework

The MSW program includes one required research course (SOW 5404) and a non-clinical elective research course (SOW 6914):

  • SOW 5404 Social Work Research provides an overview of research methodology.
  • SOW 6914 Integrative Research Project provides an opportunity to develop a research project.

Students will also engage in research as individuals and as group members in various forms in other courses in the program.

Research in the School is guided by ethical principles. Research involving human subjects requires permission from the UCF Institutional Review Board. All students will take the online human subjects course called CITI as an assignment in their required research course.

School of Social Work Faculty Research

To learn about the various research opportunities the School of Social Work offers, please visit www.cohpa.ucf.edu/faculty-research/school-of-social-work/.

Financial Support

COPHA Information

There are a number of sources of financial assistance available to students. Many types of assistance require separate applications for each semester, while others allow for the application for both semesters to be submitted at the same time. Meeting an application deadline is essential; applications received after an announced date will not be considered.

For additional information about funding for graduate school, please visit the College of Graduate Studies Funding website.

If you are interested in applying for loans or externally funded need-based awards, visit the Office of Student Financial Assistance website at finaid.ucf.edu and complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which is available January 1 each year.

Social Work Resources for Students

Field Program:Some field internships offer paid internships. There are no guarantees for paid internships. Please contact the Field Office for more information.

Grants: Occasionally, faculty receives grants to conduct research and training. A number of these awards carry student positions, either graduate or undergraduate. Faculty announces these positions when they become available. The level of the award depends on the size of the grant and the student activities involved.

Graduate Student Associations

Master of Social Work Student Association

The MSW Student Association provides a forum for graduate students to organize, develop supportive relationships, to communicate with each other and faculty, and to promote the collective interests of the social work program and the profession. The Association is open to all MSW students and meets monthly during the academic year. Application forms for MSWSA membership are available outside room 236 -HPA 1.

Graduate Student Association (GSA)

GSA is UCF's graduate organization committed to enrich graduate students' personal, educational and professional experience. To learn more or get involved, please visit www.gsa.ucf.edu. For individual department or graduate program organizations, please see program advisor.

MSW Committee Membership

The charge of the committee is, to deliberate and approve of policies pertaining to the MSW program, curriculum changes, review applications, and student advancement concerns. The committee is also responsible for making suggestions regarding how to implement decisions of the Governing Faculty regarding the graduate program. This committee is composed of the MSW Program Coordinator (chair), MSW Advising Coordinator, MSW full time faculty members, and a student at large. The student will be appointed by the MSW Coordinator and must be a current MSW student and in good standing.

Phi Alpha Social Work Honor Society/Nu Pi Chapter

The Nu Pi Chapter of the Phi Alpha National Social Work Honor Society was established at UCF in the fall of 2006. Its mission is to recognize and promote scholastic achievement among students and faculty in the undergraduate or graduate social work program at the University of Central Florida. The following are the minimum requirements for recommendation for membership: a declared social work major of at least sophomore status, completed 9 semester (credit) hours of required social work courses, an overall GPA of 3.0 and a social work GPA of 3.25. One time national dues ($20.00) and yearly chapter dues ($10.00) are the member's responsibility. Members in good standing may wear the Phi Alpha medallion with graduation regalia. 

Professional Development

National Association of Social Workers

The National Association of Social Workers (NASW) is the largest professional social work organization in the world. Social work students at UCF are eligible and strongly encouraged to join NASW. Students who join NASW can take advantage of reduced dues rates while in graduate school. Special transitional dues are available for the first two years following graduation. Subscriptions to the bimonthly Social Work journal and monthly NASW News/Personnel Information are included in the membership dues. Reduced rates on various NASW journals, books and periodicals are also available. Social work students in NASW have voting privileges in national and local association elections. Students can hold office on the national board and local committees, as well as forming on-campus program units. Students may be nominated for NASW’s local and Florida “Student Social Worker of the Year” award. Application forms for NASW membership are available in HPA 1 - 204. Their website is: www.naswdc.org.

Teaching and Learning

The Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning (FCTL) promotes excellence in all levels of teaching at the University of Central Florida. They offer several programs for the professional development of Graduate Teaching Assistants at UCF.

  • GTA Training (mandatory for employment as a GTA)
    This training provides information and resources for students who will be instructors in a two-day workshop. The seminars cover a variety of topics, including course development, learning theories, lecturing, and academic freedom. Those interested in additional training can also attend an optional training session that normally follows the mandatory training.
  • Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Program
    This certificate program (12-weeks) consists of group and individualized instruction by Faculty Center staff and experienced UCF professors. Textbooks and materials are provided.

For more information: www.fctl.ucf.edu > Events > GTA Programs or call 407-823-3544. 

Pathways to Success Workshops

Coordinated by the College of Graduate Studies, the Pathways to Success program offers free development opportunities for graduate students including workshops in Academic Integrity, Graduate Grantsmanship, Graduate Teaching, Personal Development, Professional Development, and Research. For more information and how to register, please visit www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/pathways/.

Graduate Research Forum

The Graduate Research Forum will feature poster displays representing UCF’s diverse colleges and disciplines. It is an opportunity for students to showcase their research and creative projects and to receive valuable feedback from faculty judges. Awards for best poster presentation in each category will be given and all participants will receive recognition.

The College of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Student Association invite all UCF students, community, and employers to attend the Graduate Research Forum. For more information, contact researchweek@ucf.edu.

Other

Students should take opportunities to present a poster or a topic of research at a conference. To obtain financial support to present at a conference (other than through your program) or to engage in comparable creative activity at a professional meeting, visit the Graduate Travel Fellowship section at www.graduate.ucf.edu.

For grant-proposal writing resources: uwc.cah.ucf.edu/students/

Job Search

Career Services

The Career Service office offers services and resources to aid in the career exploration and job search of Master and Doctoral students in every academic discipline. They can help you to assess your skills, interests, values, and experiences as they relate to your long-range career goals. Once you have defined those goals, they support you in your job search. Whether you are looking for jobs inside or outside of the academy, they can help you prepare a resume or curriculum vita, design your career portfolio, gain valuable part-time employment and graduate assistantships, and assist you in negotiating job offers. Located in the CSEL building, Room 140, and Website: www.career.ucf.edu

Forms

  • College of Graduate Studies Forms
    A listing of general forms and files for graduate students including student services and records and graduation forms.
  • Traveling Scholar Form
     Required form of graduate students who would like to take advantage of resources available on another campus, but not available at UCF;

Useful Links