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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2016-2017

Program Info

Last Updated 2013-07-16

Industrial Engineering PhD



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Introduction

The Industrial Engineering PhD program requires a minimum of 72 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree. Beyond the master's degree, students must complete at least 27 credit hours of required courses that include 6 credit hours of doctoral core, 9 credit hours in specialization core courses in a selected area (engineering management, human system engineering/ergonomics, interactive simulation and training systems, quality systems engineering, systems operations and modeling, or systems engineering) and 12 credit hours of doctoral elective courses in addition to 15 credit hours of dissertation.

Of the total course work taken, 27 hours must be formal course work exclusive of independent study and 15 credit hours must consist of dissertation research (EIN 7980). All remaining hours are determined with a faculty adviser and approved by the department. Details about this program are located in this Indistrial Engineering PhD Handbook. 

As a pre-doctoral student at the beginning of the PhD program, a preliminary plan of study must be developed with the graduate program coordinator and meet with departmental approval. At this time transfer credit will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. After completion of the Qualifying Examination and admission as a doctoral student, the official plan of study is developed with an adviser and must meet with departmental approval. The student’s dissertation committee approves the final plan of study after the Candidacy Examination is passed. The degree must be completed within seven years from the date of admission as a pre-doctoral student and within four years of passing the Candidacy Examination.

The Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems monitors student progress and may revert any student to non degree status if performance standards or academic progress are not maintained. Satisfactory academic performance in a program includes, but is not limited to, maintaining at least a 3.0 GPA in all graduate work taken as part of (or transferred into) the plan of study. Satisfactory performance also involves maintaining the standards of academic progress and professional integrity expected in our discipline. Failure to maintain these standards may result in dismissal from the program.

Depending on a student's chosen area of specialization, this program can be taken entirely through FEEDS.

Curriculum

The Industrial Engineering PhD program requires a minimum of 72 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree. Beyond the master's degree, students must complete at least 27 credit hours of required course work, in addition to 15 credit hours of dissertation.

Of the total course work taken, 27 hours must be formal course work exclusive of independent study and 15 credit hours must consist of dissertation research (EIN 7980). All remaining hours are determined with a faculty adviser and approved by the department. Details about this program are located in the Industrial Engineering PhD Handbook.


The Industrial Engineering PhD program requires a minimum of 72 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree. Beyond the master's degree, students must complete at least 27 credit hours of required formal course work exclusive of independent study, in addition to 15 credit hours of dissertation research (EIN 7980).

All remaining hours are determined with a faculty adviser and approved by the department. Details about this program are located in the Industrial Engineering PhD Handbook.

As a pre-doctoral student at the beginning of the PhD program, a preliminary plan of study must be developed with the graduate program director and meet with departmental approval. At this time transfer credit will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. The student’s plan of study itemizing the study plan must be approved prior to the end of the first semester of studies by the Graduate Director of the IEMS department.  

After completion of the Qualifying Examination and admission as a doctoral student, the official plan of study is developed that must meet with departmental approval. The student’s dissertation committee approves the final plan of study after the Candidacy Examination is passed. These steps are normally completed within the first year of study beyond the master’s degree. The degree must be completed within seven years from the date of admission as a pre-doctoral student and within four years of passing the Candidacy Examination.

The Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems monitors student progress and may dismiss a student if performance standards or academic progress are not maintained. Satisfactory academic performance in a program includes, but is not limited to, maintaining at least a 3.0 GPA in all graduate work taken as part of (or transferred into) the plan of study. Satisfactory performance also involves maintaining the standards of academic progress and professional integrity expected in our discipline. Failure to maintain these standards may result in dismissal from the program.

Prerequisites

Students must have background in the following areas.

  • MS degree in Industrial Engineering or related discipline
  • Must have MS Core knowledge (to be tested through Qualifying Examination)

Required Courses—6 Credit Hours

  • ESI 6891 IEMS Research Methods (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6247 Experimental Design and Taguchi Methods (3 credit hours)

Elective Courses—up to 21 Credit Hours

  • Up to seven unrestricted electives

Credit Waived from an Earned Master's Degree—up to 30 Credit Hours

A maximum of 30 semester credit hours from an earned master's degree may be applied toward these requirements. Waived credits are evaluated on a course-by-course basis.

Dissertation—15 Credit Hours

  • EIN 7980 Dissertation (15 credits hours minimum) 

Other Electives

Students, with the approval of their advisers and/or the graduate program director, may select from the following groups of courses to satisfy the needs of their research goals or career objectives. To assist students in achieving their goals and objectives, courses are grouped below to suggest focus areas, only as guides for advising and course selection. The listing of these courses does not guarantee that they will be offered by the department in a particular year or semester.

In addition to the courses listed below, students may be allowed to take courses from the following disciplines, with the approval of the graduate program director, as an elective in their graduate plan of study.

  • Other Engineering Programs
  • Computer Science
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Business Administration/Management
Group A: Human System Engineering/Ergonomics
  • EIN 5248C Ergonomics  
  • EIN 5251 Usability Engineering
  • EIN 6270C Work Physiology
  • EIN 6258 Human-Computer Interaction
  • EIN 6279C Biomechanics
  • EIN 6935 Advanced Ergonomics Topics
  • EIN 6271 Human Reliability
Group B: Quality and Production Systems
  • ESI 6225 Quality Design and Control
  • ESI 6224 Quality Management
  • EIN 5392C Manufacturing Systems Engineering
  • EIN 6336 Production and Inventory Systems
  • EIN 6425 Scheduling and Sequencing
  • EIN 5356 Cost Engineering
  • ESI 5227 Total Quality Improvement
Group C: Management Systems
  • EIN 6182 Engineering Management
  • EIN 5117 Management Information Systems I
  • EIN 6370 Innovation in Engineering Design
  • EIN 6339 Operations Engineering
  • EIN 5108 The Environment of Technical Organizations

Group D: Simulation, Optimization, and Modeling

  • ESI 6336 Queuing Systems
  • ESI 5306 Operations Research
  • ESI 6418 Linear Programming and Extensions
  • ESI 6532 Object-Oriented Simulation
  • ESI 5531 Discrete System Simulation
  • EIN 5255C Interactive Simulation
  • EIN 6528 Simulation Based Life Cycle Engineering
  • EIN 6645 Real-Time Simulation Agents
  • EIN 6936 Seminar in Advanced Industrial Engineering
  • ESI 5419C Engineering Applications of Linear and Nonlinear Optimization
  • ESI 6217 Statistical Aspects of Digital Simulation
Group E: Systems Engineering
  • ESI 6358 Decision Analysis
  • ESI 5359 Risk Assessment and Management
  • EIN 6215 Systems Safety Engineering and Management
  • ESI 5236 Reliability Engineering
  • EIN 5346 Engineering Logistics

Examinations

At Qualifying Examination (QE) time students should know their intended direction of research but they do not necessarily know their specific topic/problem. The QE’s objective is to determine whether the student’s knowledge allows for a thorough understanding of methods and techniques discussed in the literature in his/her area(s) of interest.

The IEMS PhD Qualifying Examination is a take-home exam designed to test the student’s knowledge of fundamentals within the discipline and to assess the student’s ability to conduct independent research and to think analytically, creatively, and independently. Exam questions address the student’s global research awareness as well as his/her analytical thinking, research potential, and communication skills. The student must be able to understand the field’s literature, as well as to summarize and discuss research findings.

It is strongly recommended that students take ESI 6891 IEMS Research Methods prior to taking the Qualifying Examination. While thinking about taking the Qualifying Examination, students are strongly encouraged to evaluate their options for research and make informed decisions about their area of research interests.  It is recommended that students seek advice from faculty members whose research interests match their own research areas in order for the students to properly select their electives and develop the appropriate plan of study. 

In addition to the Qualifying Examination, the student must pass a Candidacy Examination and a Dissertation Defense Examination. Details about these examinations and other requirements are located in the Industrial Engineering PhD Handbook.

The Candidacy Examination may be taken any time after successful completion of the Qualifying Examination, but not in the same semester. The objective of the Candidacy Examination is to determine if the student has the breadth and depth of knowledge required to conduct independent research in the proposed area. The Candidacy Examination includes an oral presentation of a detailed dissertation proposalwhich becomes the oral candidacy document, and the written component of the Candidacy Examination is satisfied by the proposal document, which becomes the required candidacy document.

The Dissertation Defense Examination is an oral examination taken in defense of the written dissertation. The College of Engineering and Computer Science requires that all dissertation defense announcements are approved by the student's adviser and posted on the college's website and on the Events Calendar of the College of Graduate Studies website at least two weeks before the defense date.

Dissertation Committee Requirement

The doctoral committee must consist of a minimum of four members: at least three must be graduate faculty members from within the student’s department, and one must be at large, from graduate faculty scholars outside the Industrial Engineering faculty. The committee chair must be a member of the graduate faculty who is approved to direct dissertations. Faculty members with joint appointments in IEMS may serve as department-faculty committee members. Adjunct faculty and off-campus experts who are graduate faculty scholars may serve as the outside-the-department person on the committee, as well as serve as co-chairs of the committee with the approval of the department Chair. The College of Graduate Studies reserves the right to review appointments to advisory committees, place a representative on any advisory committee, or appoint a co-adviser.

Joint faculty members may serve as committee chairs. Off-campus experts and adjunct faculty who are graduate faculty scholars may not serve as committee chairs, but may serve as co-chairs.

All committee members vote on acceptance or rejection of the dissertation proposal and the final dissertation. The dissertation proposal or final dissertation must be approved by the advisory committee with no more than one dissenting vote.

Admission to Candidacy

The following are required to be admitted to candidacy and enroll in dissertation hours. Evidence of successful completion of these requirements must be received by the College of Graduate Studies one day prior to the start of classes for the semester in which a student wishes to enroll in dissertation hours. 

  • Completion or near completion of course work, except for dissertation hours.  
  • Successful completion of the candidacy examination, including successful defense of the written dissertation proposal.  
  • The dissertation advisory committee is formed, consisting of approved graduate faculty and graduate faculty scholars.  
  • Submittal of an approved program of study. 

Equipment Fee

Students in the Industrial Engineering PhD program pay a $58 equipment fee each semester that they are enrolled. For part-time students, the equipment fee is $29 per semester. 


Timeline for Completion

You may need to contact program advisor for updated course plan. You may also visit iems.ucf.edu/admissions/graduate/PStemplates.html to obtain a Plan of Study template.

Examination Requirements

In addition to the Qualifying Examination, the student must pass a Candidacy Examination, and a Dissertation Defense Examination. The Qualifying Examination is a written exam that focuses on the student's mastery of the content covered in the IEMS MS program's coure courses that are listed above.

Doctoral Qualifying (QE) Examination

IEMS MS students who plan to continue their studies for the Industrial Engineering PhD can take the qualifying exam in the last semester before or the first semester after graduation. Graduates from other MS programs may delay taking the qualifying exam until they have taken the MS core courses. The maximum delay is one year or three semesters after admission to the program. Courses other than MS core that are taken to prepare for the qualifying exam cannot be part of the doctoral plan of study.

The QE is normally taken within the first three semesters in the doctoral program, soon after the specialization core courses have been completed. The purpose of this examination is to assure the faculty that the student possesses a basic understanding of the field of Industrial Engineering. It has the second purpose of determining those areas where additional prerequisite study may be needed. It is offered twice annually, in the fall and spring semesters. Based on his/her performance during the examination, the student may be permitted to retake part or the entire exam. Only one such re-examination is permitted, it will be given at the next scheduled examination period.

Specifically, the Qualifying Examination is a one-day examination integrating the material from the courses that constitute the core for the Industrial Engineering MS program.  These courses are:

  • ESI 5219 Engineering Statistics (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5140 Project Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • ESI 6551C Systems Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 6357 Advanced Engineering Economic Analysis (3 credit hours)

The student should notify the IEMS Graduate Office of his/her intention to take the exam at least two months prior to the published exam date.

Three weeks prior to the exam the Graduate Office will provide more details about the exam location, specific instructions, dates and times, and Qualifying Examination Committee Chair and Committee Members. 

If the student passes, his/her doctoral status will be changed and the student can begin to select a dissertation committee and prepare for the Candidacy Examination. If the student fails, the committee will generally recommend one or several of the following options:

  1. Retake the exam (the student may only retake the exam once at the next time it is offered)
  2. Retake specific parts of the exam
  3. Take specific courses
  4. Retake specific parts of the exam and take specific courses
  5. Other recommendation the committee sees appropriate
  6. Withdraw from the PhD program

If the potential PhD student fails the Qualifying Examination twice, he/she will be asked to leave the program.

In cases where articulation work is clearly required, retaking the Qualifying Examination may be deferred until such work is complete or nearly complete. The Department makes decisions about continuing support in the program based in part on Qualifying Examination results.

After completion of the Qualifying Examination and admission as a doctoral student, an official plan of study is developed with the advisor and must meet with departmental approval. The student’s dissertation committee approves the final plan of study after passing the Candidacy Examination. The degree must be completed within seven years from the date of admission as a pre-doctoral student and within four years of passing the Candidacy Examination.

Admission to Candidacy

Evidence of successful completion of the following requirements must be received by the College of Graduate Studies no later than one day prior to the start of classes for the semester in which a student wishes to enroll in dissertation hours.

  • Completion or near completion of course work, except for dissertation hours.
  • Submittal of an approved plan of study.
  • The dissertation advisory committee is formed, consisting of approved graduate faculty and graduate faculty scholars.
  • Successful completion of the candidacy examination, including successful defense of the written dissertation proposal.

Doctoral Candidacy Examination

The Candidacy Examination may be taken any time after successful completion of the qualifying exam, but not in the same semester. The objective of the candidacy examination is to determine if the student has the breadth and depth of knowledge required to conduct independent research in the proposed area.  The candidacy examination include an oral presentation of a detailed dissertation proposal, which becomes the oral candidacy document and the written component of the candidacy examination is satisfied by the proposal document, which becomes the required candidacy document.

The purpose of a dissertation is to show that the student can demonstrate mastery of a discipline and the ability to do original research in that discipline. The student’s specific discipline is characterized by an underlying theory, an associated methodology, and applications. The original research is intended to make a contribution to the body of knowledge in the student’s selected area. The oral presentation is intended to determine whether the proposed topic is of PhD caliber, and whether the student has the background to conduct independent research on that topic. The candidacy examination is conducted by the student's dissertation committee. After the dissertation advisor accepts the written candidacy document, the student will schedule the Candidacy Examination, making sure that the committee members have at least two weeks to review the written proposal. The oral presentation normally includes the student research area, justification for the proposed topic, and a proposed research plan.  The student is expected to describe the research topic, elaborate on the importance of the research problem, provide a thorough literature research, identify the student’s unique contribution, and lay out the direction and expectations of the research.

As a result of the student’s performance in the Candidacy Examination, the dissertation committee may recommend:

  1. Topic is acceptable. Some extra courses or study may be recommended. The plan of study is finalized and the student may continue taking dissertation hours.
  2. Topic shows potential. In this case, extra courses or study may be recommended. The student is required to modify the proposal and to re-take the Dissertation Proposal Examination.
  3. Topic is not suitable for a doctoral dissertation. The student is asked to change topics. The student may want to re-start the process with a different advisor and committee. The department chair with the advice of the new dissertation advisor and committee will decide whether the student needs to re-take the Candidacy Examination before re-taking the Dissertation Proposal Examination under the new topic.
  4. Student performance is inadequate. The committee recommends that the student discontinue doctoral studies.

It is the responsibility of the committee chair to notify the Department Graduate Director, in writing, of the successful completion of the candidacy examination and the date of occurrence of the exam. The student must wait a minimum of one semester between the completion of the candidacy/proposal examination and the presentation of the dissertation defense.

In order for the student to enroll in dissertation hours, he/she must have successfully completed the candidacy examination and the associated paperwork must have been processed and approved all the way through the College of Graduate Studies before the first day of classes of the following semester.

Dissertation Requirements

Doctoral Dissertation Committee

When formulating a topic and beginning his/her dissertation, the doctoral student should approach faculty members early to ask if they would be willing to serve on the student’s dissertation committee. The Dean, through the Department Chair, is responsible for committee additions and deletions.

The doctoral committee must consist of a minimum of four members: at least three must be graduate faculty members from within the student’s department, and one must be at large, from graduate faculty scholars outside the Industrial Engineering faculty. The committee chair must be a member of the graduate faculty who is approved to direct dissertations. Faculty members with joint appointments in IEMS may serve as department-faculty committee members. Adjunct faculty and off-campus experts who are graduate faculty scholars may serve as the outside-the-department person on the committee, as well as serve as co-chairs of the committee with the approval of the department Chair. The College of Graduate Studies reserves the right to review appointments to advisory committees, place a representative on any advisory committee, or appoint a co-adviser.

Joint faculty members may serve as committee chairs. Off-campus experts and adjunct faculty who are graduate faculty scholars may not serve as committee chairs, but may serve as co-chairs.

All committee members vote on acceptance or rejection of the dissertation proposal and the final dissertation. The dissertation proposal or final dissertation must be approved by the advisory committee with no more than one dissenting vote.

Students have the right to change members of their committee, including the Committee Chair, at any point. However, in the event the change takes effect after the proposal examination, a new examination must take place in front of the new committee.

University Dissertation Requirements

The College of Graduate Studies Thesis and Dissertation page contains information on the university’s requirements for dissertation formatting, format review, defenses, final submission, and more. A step-by-step completion guide is also available at Completing Your Thesis or Dissertation.

All university deadlines are listed in the  Academic Calendar. Your program or college may have other earlier deadlines; please check with your program and college staff for additional deadlines.

The following requirements must be met by dissertation students in their final term:

  • Submit a properly formatted file for initial format review by the format review deadline
  • Submit the Thesis and Dissertation Release Option form well before the defense
  • Defend by the defense deadline
  • Receive format approval (if not granted upon initial review)
  • Submit signed approval form by final submission deadline
  • Submit final dissertation document by final submission deadline

Students must format their dissertation according to the standards outlined at Formatting the ETD. Formatting questions or issues can be submitted to the Format Help page in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. Format reviews and final submission must be completed in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site. The Dissertation Approval Form is also available in the Thesis and Dissertation Services site.

The College of Graduate Studies offers several thesis and dissertation Workshops each term. Students are highly encouraged to attend these workshops early in the dissertation process to fully understand the above policies and procedures.

The College of Graduate Studies thesis and dissertation office is best reached by email at editor@ucf.edu

Doctoral Defense Examination

The Dissertation Defense Examination is an oral examination taken in defense of the written dissertation. The College of Engineering and Computer Science requires that all dissertation defense announcements be approved by the student's adviser and posted on the college's website and on the Events Calendar of the College of Graduate Studies website at least two weeks before the defense date.  At least one full semester must elapse between the Dissertation Proposal Examination and the Dissertation Defense. 

This examination is conducted by the student's Dissertation Committee and may be supplemented by a faculty member appointed by and representing the CECS Director of Graduate Affairs. The dissertation must be approved by the Dissertation Committee with no more than one dissenting vote.

The student and advisor are responsible for the proper preparation of the written dissertation. The dissertation must conform to the University’s formatting requirements.

After appropriate revisions, a revised draft is submitted to the Dissertation Committee members for their review at least two weeks prior to the defense date. The committee’s comments are usually submitted to the student at the time of the defense. After the defense, the various comments are addressed in a final revision that is submitted to the advisor and the committee for final approval. Students should anticipate that this draft/review/revise/review cycle can be time consuming. Once the student has successfully defended his/her dissertation he/she needs to submit a final PDF version to Graduate Studies to be archived.

Every dissertation is defended in a public forum. The student should schedule the defense with the advisor and the committee members at a mutually agreeable time. University-wide notice must be given at least one week before the scheduled defense. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that the proper notice is prepared (see guidebook for format), signed by the Committee Chair, and submitted to the IEMS Graduate Office in time to meet this deadline. The student is responsible for securing a suitable room for presenting the dissertation defense. In preparing for the dissertation defense, the student should work with the advisor to develop a suitable presentation. Note that not all students pass the dissertation defense the first time. Students should allow sufficient time in the semester in case a repeat defense is required.

Graduate Research

Graduate Research

The University of Central Florida has strict guidelines for graduate students conducting research that involves human and animal subjects. All theses and dissertations that use research involving human subjects, including surveys, must obtain approval from an independent board, the Institutional Review Board (IRB), prior to starting the research. It is imperative that proper procedures are followed when using human subjects in research projects. Information about this process can be obtained from the Office of Research (www.research.ucf.edu). Failure to obtain this prior approval could jeopardize receipt of the student’s degree.

All graduate students conducting research while attending the University of Central Florida must be familiar with the school’s “Patent and Invention Policy.” The full content of the Patent and Invention Policy is located online in the Graduate Catalog. The university has three fundamental responsibilities with regard to graduate student research:

  1. Support an academic environment that stimulates the spirit of inquiry.
  2. Develop the intellectual property stemming from research.
  3. Disseminate the intellectual property to the general public.

The University of Central Florida owns the intellectual property developed using university resources. The graduate-student-as-inventor will, according to this policy, share in the proceeds of the invention.

Faculty Research

The Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems faculty members are all actively involved in research projects and collaborations in addition to their teaching responsibilities. Current faculty research projects and interests include, but are not limited to:

  • Strategic management
  • Strategic planning
  • Organizational transformations and change management
  • Program/project management.
  • Modeling and simulation
  • Multicriteria optimization
  • Data mining
  • Applied Operations Research
  • Supply Chain Management Modeling
  • Distribution Center Design
  • Healthcare Logistics
  • Data mining including supervised and unsupervised learning and their applications in Industrial Engineering and Biomedicine
  • Optimization methods in data mining
  • Network analysis with application to infrastructure reliability
  • Operations research
  • Quality management and performance excellence
  • Lean six sigma applications in manufacturing, service and healthcare organizations
  • Business process reengineering
  • Manufacturing systems engineering
Other research areas include:
  • A Real-Time Human Reliability Assessment Method
  • An Industry-Academic Partnership to Enhance Capstone Engineering Design
  • Applications of Intelligent Agents and Knowledge Base Systems to Human Factors
  • Computerized Instructional Systems Development and Evaluation
  • Developing Improved Algorithms for Deterministic Resource Constrained Project Scheduling
  • Development of an Enhanced Biological/Chemical Isolation Suit with Internal Cooling
  • GSRP: Strategic Implementation Through Process Alignment
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Human-Virtual Environment Interaction
  • Immersive Center: Achieving Excellence in Multimodal Interactive Systems Design
  • Manufacturing and Logistics Applications of Mathematical Modeling and Optimization
  • Quantifying and Estimating Total Body Fatigue
  • The Total Body Fatigue Estimator

Financial Support

Graduate students may receive financial assistance through fellowships, assistantships, tuition support, or loans. For more information, see www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/studentfunding, which describes the types of financial assistance available at UCF and provides general guidance in planning your graduate finances. The Financial Information section of the Graduate Catalog is another key resource.

Graduate Assistantships

The Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems employs a number of graduate teaching assistants and researchers in order to aid students financially during their academic careers. IEMS holds potential graduate assistants to the same application requirements as all other University departments. Applicants can find this information in the UCF Graduate Catalog  online, and for specific IEMS fellowships and assistantships please visit the IEMS website at www.iems.ucf.edu.

Graduate Teaching Assistant applicants who have English as their second language will be evaluated for the English-speaking skills by the Center for Multilingual Multicultural Studies, using the SPEAK Test. Students who have GTA assistantships must complete the university GTA Training requirements before beginning their assignments. For more information, see Graduate Teaching and the Financial Information section of the Graduate Catalog.

Student’s employed as Graduate Assistants, Graduate Teaching Assistants, or in any other paid position serving the University of Central Florida are wholly responsible for assuring timely receipt of financial support. Within the Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems students must follow the pay periods established by the University. The duration of the student’s financial support correlates with his or her status as either a student or student worker within IEMS; it is up to the discretion of the Department to determine the full duration of a student’s financial support.

All international students attending the University of Central Florida are encouraged to apply for employment within the school. For information about the types of employment available to international students, and the requirements and restrictions based on visa type, see the International Affairs and Global Strategies' website: www.intl.ucf.edu > Students > Employment.   

Graduate Student Associations

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is UCF's graduate organization committed to enrich graduate students' personal, educational and professional experience. To learn more or get involved, please visit www.gsa.ucf.edu. For individual department or graduate program organizations, please see program advisor.

Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE)  supports its members through continuing education, conferences, seminars and networking activities to advance their knowledge base and empower them to influence positive changes in the industry of industrial engineering.

The Florida Engineering Society prepares engineering students of all disciplines for the high level of performance and responsibility that is required to succeed in today's job market, while providing the opportunity to develop professional relationships with professional engineers, educators and peers.

National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE)  strives to increase the number of culturally responsible black engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally, and positively impact the community. 

Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE)  promotes the development of Hispanics in engineering, science and other technical professions. 

Society of Women Engineers (SWE)  is a useful resource for women in technical fields including engineering.

Student Panel for Engineering and Computer Science  promotes student interests and achievements within the College and to the technical community at-large, serving as an advisory board to the Dean of the College of Engineering and Computer Science and as a coordinating body for college-wide events.

Theta Tau Professional Engineering Fraternity  develops and maintains a high standard of professional interest among its members.

Professional Development

Graduate Certificates

The Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems offers students wishing to expand their areas of knowledge and expertise seven graduate certificate options: Applied Operations Research; Design for Usability, Industrial Ergonomics and Safety, Project Engineering, Quality Assurance, Systems Simulation for Engineers, and Training Simulation.

All students, including current UCF Master’s, specialist, or doctoral students, must complete an application that designates the graduate certificate that they wish to obtain. Students can apply for a specific graduate certificate online at www.apply.graduate.ucf.edu, and it is important that they do so, since students who do not submit an application and gain admittance to the graduate certificate program will not be processed for graduate certificate completion.

Please refer to the policies, which are more stringent than those for degree programs: grades must be “B-”(2.75) or better, no transfer courses can be used, no internship or independent study courses may be used, a course may not apply to more than one certificate program, graduate credit hours taken at UCF less than three years previously from a prior Baccalaureate, Master’s, specialist, or doctoral degree may be applied toward a certificate, with the consent of the program. Course substitutions should not be used; the graduate certificate program is a focused and specific course of study. For more information on graduate certificate policies please visit the most current UCF Graduate Catalog at www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu > Policies > Graduate Certificate Program Policies.

Students must submit an application for a specific graduate certificate. Students who do not submit an application and gain admittance to the graduate certificate program will not be processed for graduate certificate completion.

Professional Development Programs

The University of Central Florida offers students the opportunities to continue their professional development by participating in a variety of programs.

  • Preparing Tomorrow's Faculty Program, sponsored by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning, offers those graduate students interested in teaching university courses during their time of study at UCF, the opportunity to gain the skills necessary to do so. Students participating in the program will receive group and individualized instruction by Faculty Center staff and experienced UCF professors, as well as textbooks and materials. For more information on the GTA Certificate Program and its requirements please visit www.fctl.ucf.edu/Events/GTAPrograms/PreparingFutureFaculty/index.php.
  • The University of Central Florida employs a Career Services and Experimental Learning Facility to aid students in their endeavors through their academic careers and after. Please visit the Career Services and Experimental Learning Facility website, www.career.ucf.edu for more information on the services offered.
  • The College of Graduate Studies sponsors a Graduate Research Forum which features poster displays and oral presentations representing UCF’s diverse colleges and disciplines. The Research Forum is an opportunity for students to showcase their research and creative projects and to receive valuable feedback from faculty judges. For more information on the Graduate Research Forum please visit www.graduate.ucf.edu/ResearchForum.
  • Coordinated by the College of Graduate Studies, the Pathways to Success program offers free development opportunities for graduate students including workshops in Academic Integrity, Graduate Grantsmanship, Graduate Teaching, Personal Development, Professional Development, and Research. For more information and how to register, please visit www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/pathways/.

Internships

For information concerning internships, please visit the IEMS website (iems.ucf.edu/) or make an appointment to speak with the Associate Chair directly.

Awards and Special Recognition

UCF sponsors awards for excellence in graduate student teaching and for excellence in thesis and dissertation research. University-level award winners will receive $1,000 cash awards. Additional information regarding the application/nomination process is available from the Associate Chair or the College of Graduate Studies website at www.graduate.ucf.edu/GradAwards .

Job Search

UCF’s Career Services department offers a wide range of programs and services designed to assist graduate students. These services include evaluation and exploration of career goals, preparation for the job search and job search resources. To learn more, visit their website at www.career.ucf.edu.

For specific services or resources provided by the academic program, please contact the graduate program director or academic advisor.

Forms

  • College of Graduate Studies Forms
    This web link provides a listing of forms and files for the College of Graduate Studies.
  • Course Override Form
    Students will need to fill out this form if they are requesting registration into a course for which they cannot currently register. The course instructor must approve the override form before it is turned in to the department advisor.
  • Graduate Special Registration Access Form
    If a hold has been placed on a student’s record due to an unmet obligation to the University of Central Florida, he/she will need to fill out this form in order to be allowed access to register. After the form has been completely filled out turn it in to the Program Coordinator, who will then review it and make the appropriate decision.

Useful Links