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UCF - Graduate Program Handbooks 2016-2017

Program Info

Last Updated 2015-04-21

Applied Experimental and Human Factors Psychology PhD



Together, the Graduate Student Handbook and your graduate program handbook should serve as your main guide throughout your graduate career. The Graduate Student Handbook includes university information, policies, requirements and guidance for all graduate students. Your program handbook describes the details about graduate study and requirements in your specific program. While both of these handbooks are wonderful resources, know that you are always welcome to talk with faculty and staff in your program and in the Graduate College.

The central activities and missions of a university rest upon the fundamental assumption that all members of the university community conduct themselves in accordance with a strict adherence to academic and scholarly integrity. As a graduate student and member of the university community, you are expected to display the highest standards of academic and personal integrity.

Here are some resources to help you better understand your responsibilities:

Introduction

WELCOME

Welcome to the new AEHF graduate students. The faculty is very pleased that you have chosen to attend the University of Central Florida for your graduate training in Applied Experimental and Human Factors Psychology. We have a nationally and internationally recognized program that is accredited by the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

AEHF students have made significant contributions to the national Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Meeting for several years, and they continue to present papers, posters, and be involved in various aspects of the Meeting itself. Many valuable contacts are made at such meetings, which lead to research and job opportunities. In addition, students have published papers in peer-reviewed journals.

Several of the faculty members over the years have secured more than a million dollars in grants and contracts, and several have both national and international reputations. The program’s reputation is built on the contributions of both faculty and students. While you are students at UCF, please make the most of your opportunities for research, and obtain a solid foundation of knowledge in psychology and research methods. Take advantage of mentoring available and do research. In the years following your graduation you will probably look back to your days in graduate school fondly. The friendships you make in graduate school with other students and with professors will last throughout your careers. Have a great day.

Mustapha Mouloua, PhD
Professor and Director
PhD Program in Applied Experimental and Human Factors Psychology

INTRODUCTION

The UCF Graduate Catalog is the University’s official record of graduate policies. In any case where this handbook appears to disagree with the Graduate Catalog, the Graduate Catalog is the final authority. The Graduate Catalog may be accessed via the UCF website at: www.graduatecatalog.ucf.edu.

About Applied Experimental and Human Factors Psychology

The fields of Applied Experimental Psychology, Human Factors, and Ergonomics adopt a multidisciplinary approach to the study of the interaction between humans and the environment, including systems, products, people, and procedures. Human Factors, as one of the core disciplines of the track, is a science that adds the human into the equation to make life easier, safer and more enjoyable by applying psychological theory and research to human-centered design. A well known Human Factors textbook describes the field in the following quotation.

“Human factors is the application of scientific knowledge and principles to the design of products, systems, and/or environments. The goal of human factors is making the human interaction with systems one that: reduces error, increases productivity, enhances safety, and enhances comfort. Human Factors then involves the study of factors and development of tools that facilitate the achievement of these goals” (Wickens, Gordon, and Liu, 1998, p. 2).

As scientific disciplines, Applied Experimental Psychology and Human Factors overlap with areas such as Engineering Psychology, Social Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Cognitive Engineering, Ergonomics, and Industrial Engineering. Human Factors researchers and practitioners work in areas such as automation, cognition, decision-making, display processing, human-computer interaction, physiology, safety and human error, sensation and perception, sensory systems, stress, workload, training, transportation, and workspace design.

Contact Information

Department Chair: Jeffrey Cassisi, PhD
Telephone: 407-823-3576
e-mail: jeffrey.cassisi@ucf.edu

Program Director: Mustapha Mouloua, PhD
Telephone: 407-823-2910
e-mail: mustapha.mouloua@ucf.edu

AEHF Program Assistant: Dolores Romero-Aldana
Telephone: 407-823-4601
e-mail: Dolores.Romero-Aldana@ucf.edu

Mission Statement

A PhD professional degree track in Applied Experimental and Human Factors (AEHF) Psychology is offered to those with a baccalaureate or master’s degree in psychology or an allied area. The track seeks to develop the capacity to design, conduct, and apply applied experimental and human factors research in a variety of professional settings. It is patterned on the scientist-practitioner model of the American Psychological Association (APA) and adheres to guidelines established by the committee for Education and Training of APA’s Division 21 (Applied Experimental and Engineering Psychology). The track has been accredited by the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES).

Students receive training in the content and techniques of human factors psychology-including statistical and quantitative procedures, experimental design, survey methods, computer techniques, and other research methodologies. Students also select a concentration area, which they complete as part of their required elective coursework. Examples include human-computer interaction, human-machine-environment interface, human performance, human factors in simulation and training, or other areas of interest with advisor authorization. In addition to the course requirements students must demonstrate their knowledge and skills by completing the five competency domains. Finally, a dissertation representing a significant research contribution to the field is required.

Consistent with the Department’s Mission Statement, the AEHF Doctoral Program’s overall goals are to:

  • Train and educate leaders in Psychology at the doctoral level within the scientist-practitioner tradition
  • Facilitate the exploration and understanding of the complexity of human behavior while expanding our collective knowledge base through multiple avenues (e.g., publications in scientific journals, conference presentations, teaching)
  • Strive to improve the health and quality of life of individuals through excellence in education as well as in research and practice in human-technology interaction.

The overall philosophy that drives these goals is embodied in the policy statement that emerged from the National Conference on Scientist-Practitioner Education and Training for the Professional Practice of Psychology held in Gainesville, Florida on January 16-20, 1990. The training model of the AEHF Doctoral Program reflects our efforts to educate students so that they can advance psychological knowledge through research and scholarship, and to evaluate the impact of training regimens and interface designs using empirically derived methods and procedures. The model also strives to help students learn how to think critically and scientifically about problems while invoking the highest standards of ethical and professional conduct. The overall philosophy of the training program is consistent with that of the Mission Statement of the Department, the College of Sciences, the Graduate School, and the University (www.ucf.edu/mission/).

Advising and Mentoring

Each student entering the AEHF program will be assigned an advisor who will supervise the student’s research activities and serve as a mentor to the student. Students are assigned to an advisor based on program fit and research interests.  A formal relationship with an advisor must be established by the end of the first semester in the program by completing a form signed by both the student and the advisor.  Subsequent changes in advisors must be accomplished by filing a petition with the Program Committee (see below). The performance of each graduate student will be evaluated annually at the beginning of the Fall semester by his/her advisor and discussed among the AEHF faculty.  The purpose for these evaluations is to identify areas of strength and accomplishments as well as those skills in need of further development.  Students are expected to meet with their academic advisor on a regular basis to discuss their academic and professional progress.   

Expectations of Doctoral Students

Graduates of the program are expected to demonstrate specific competencies in research and practice that prepare them to function independently in a variety of roles and settings relevant to the practice of AEHF. Graduates are expected to independently generate new knowledge and contribute to extant knowledge in psychology through publication and presentation of original research. They also are expected to be erudite consumers of psychological and psychologically related research findings, and to have the skills to utilize this knowledge and future research findings when they become human factors professionals.

For general policies regarding students’ responsibilities, please see the section titled, ‘Student’s Responsibility’ in the Graduate Catalog, located under General Policies, at: www.graduate.ucf.edu/currentGradCatalog/ > Policies > General Graduate Policies > Student Responsibilities.

Changing Academic Advisors

Some students may wish to change their advisor for a variety of reasons, a common one being a change in student research interests.  In fact, the AEHF faculty understands that first year students in particular may need to change advisors as they learn more about research areas and discover their professional interests.  If a student wishes to change his/her faculty advisor, the student must submit a written petition to the Program Committee indicating the reason for requesting the change. Prior to submission to the Program Committee, the student MUST obtain the signatures of his/her current advisor AND the faculty member who would serve as the new advisor.  Both faculty members must agree to the change.  A student may not submit such a petition more than one time per academic year.

Curriculum

For students who enter with a baccalaureate degree, the Applied Experimental and Human Factors track in the Psychology PhD program requires a minimum of 75 credit hours, and students may earn the MA degree in route to the PhD by completing all of the requirements of the PhD except for dissertation. For students who already have a master’s degree in Psychology, the MA is not available. Students who enter with a master’s degree in psychology will be allowed to waive up to 30 hours of graduate course work to the doctoral program with approval of the program faculty, and will also be required to complete a minimum of 60 semester hours at UCF.


For students who already have a master's degree in psychology, the number of credit hours will depend on the number of credit hours transferred or waived. However, all students in the program must complete 15 credit hours of dissertation.

Required Courses—42 Credit Hours

  • EXP 5256 Human Factors I (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6257 Human Factors II (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6258 Human Factors III (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 5208 Sensation and Perception (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6116 Visual Performance (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6255 Human Performance (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6506 Human Cognition and Learning (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 6541 Advanced Human-Computer Interaction (3 credit hours)
  • INP 7089 Human Factors Professional Issues (3 credit hours)
  • PSB 5005 Physiological Psychology (3 credit hours)
  • PSY 7217C Advanced Research Methodology I (4 credit hours)
  • PSY 7218C Advanced Research Methodology II (4 credit hours)
  • PSY 7219C Advanced Research Methodology III (4 credit hours) 

Elective Courses—18 Credit Hours

Students should choose electives in concentrated course groupings: for example, human-machine systems, performance measurement and evaluation, simulation and training, or quantitative methods. Other elective course groupings may be developed for the student’s specific interests. Students may choose to satisfy these elective requirements by taking courses outside the Psychology Department that can serve their multidisciplinary needs. Courses outside of the Department that have already been approved as electives are contained in the list below. A student who wishes to use courses that are not included on this list may seek approval by petitioning the AEHF Faculty Committee through their academic advisor. Students may take up to 12 credit hours of Directed Research, however, it is highly recommended that they take elective courses that are related to their discipline from other graduate programs or departments at UCF. Electives may include but are not limited to the following courses:

  • DEP 5057 Developmental Psychology (3 credit hours) (Spring Only)
  • DIG 5876 Quantitative Aspects of Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • DIG 6432 Transmedia Story Creation (3 credit hours) (Fall, Summer)
  • EIN 5248C Ergonomics (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5251 Usability Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • EIN 5255C Interactive Simulation (3 credit hours) (Spring only)
  • EIN 6258 Human Computer Interaction (3 credit hours)
  • EME 6613 Instructional System Design (3 credit hours) (Occasional)
  • EME 6614 Instructional Game Design for Training and Education (3 credit hours)
  • EXP 5254 Human Factors and Aging (3 credit hours) (Fall Only)
  • EXP 6939 Teaching Seminar (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6916 Simulation Research Methods and Practicum (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6146 Modeling and Simulation Systems (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6147 Perspectives on Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours) (Fall only). May be substituted by: DIG 5875C Introduction to Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours) (Summer only)
  • IDS 6148 Human Systems Integration for Modeling and Simulation (3 credit hours)
  • IDS 6149 Modeling and Simulation for Test and Evaluation (3 credit hours)
  • INP 5825 Human-Computer Interface (HCI) Design: A Team Approach (3 credit hours)
  • INP 7310 Organizational Psychology I (3 credit hours)
  • PPE 5055 Personality Theories (3 credit hours)
  • PSB 6328 Psychophysiology (3 credit hours)
  • PSB 6348 The Neuroanatomical Basis of Psychological Function (3 credit hours)
  • PSB 6352 Neuroimaging Design and Analysis Methods (3 credit hours)
  • PSB 7349 Advanced Topics in Cognitive Neuroscience (3 credit hours)
  • PSY 5605 History and Systems of Psychology (3 credit hours)
  • SOP 5059 Advanced Social Psychology (3 credit hours)

Concentration in Cognitive Neuroscience

The Applied Experimental and Human Factors (AEHF) PhD Program offers students opportunities for both lab and course-based training in Cognitive Neuroscience. To support cognitive neuroscience research training, the Department of Psychology maintains state-of-the-art research facilities, including space and equipment for electroencephalography/event-related potentials (EEG/ERP), functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), eye tracking, pupillometry, heart-rate variability, respiration, and electrodermal activity, as well as external collaborations to support functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In addition, the AEHF Program also offers a course-based concentration in Cognitive Neuroscience with the following curriculum:

  • PSB 6328 Psychophysiology (3 credit hours)
  • PSB 6348 The Neuroanatomical Basis of Psychological Function (3 credit hours)
  • PSB 6352 Neuroimaging Design and Analysis Methods (3 credit hours)
  • PSB 7349 Advanced Topics in Cognitive Neuroscience (3 credit hours)
  • Select 6 credit hours of elective courses from the list above.

Note: Admission to these courses is not guaranteed, but is contingent on the decision of the department, college, and instructor of record for the course. 

Dissertation—15 Credit Hours

  • PSY 7980 Doctoral Dissertation (15 credit hours) 

First Year Research Project

In the first year, all students must do a laboratory research project (the First Year Project) that includes at least one empirical study. The project must be approved and will be supervised by the student’s advisor. Two weeks after the start date of the first semester of the second year (if this date falls on a weekend or academic holiday, the due date will be the first day following on which University classes are in session), the student must provide a written paper describing their work structured in accordance with APA guidelines and including all sections necessary for a typical journal submission in their field. It should not exceed 20 pages of text (exclusive of References, Tables, and Figures). Approval of the paper is required by two members of the Applied Experimental and Human Factors Area faculty (one of whom will be the student’s advisor). Additionally, the student must undergo a 20 minute oral examination based on the written report. This examination will be in the format of an academic talk delivered to area faculty and students that will occur approximately 2 weeks following submission of the First Year Paper. Satisfactory performance on both the paper and oral examination is required to maintain good standing in the program. Cases in which performance is deemed unsatisfactory will result in academic probation with a retention plan for the student, who must successfully complete this plan to maintain status in the program. However, if a student already on academic probation delivers a first year project (either paper or talk) that is deemed unsatisfactory then they may be removed from the program at the discretion of the program director.

Admission to Candidacy

The following are required to be admitted to candidacy and enroll in dissertation hours: 

  • Completion of all course work, except for dissertation hours.  
  • Successful completion of the candidacy examination.  
  • Successful defense of the written dissertation proposal.  
  • The dissertation advisory committee is formed, consisting of approved graduate faculty and graduate faculty scholars.  
  • Submittal of an approved program of study. 

Comprehensive Examinations are detailed below and involve the completion of five professional activity/competency domains.

Professional Activity/Competency Domains
Domain 1: Research
  • Published/Publishable Article (first author)

Deadline: End of sixth semester in Program (excluding summers)

Domain 2: Teaching/Professional Presentations
  • Undergraduate Instructor Experience, or
  • Professional Presentations

Deadline: End of sixth semester in Program (excluding summers)

Domain 3: Grant Proposals
  • Grant Proposal

Deadline: End of fourth semester in Program (excluding summers)

Domain 4: Research Methods
  • In class test administration will be offered in fall semester

Deadline: End of fourth semester in Program (excluding summers)

Purpose

The purpose of the qualifying and comprehensive examination is to develop and assess competency of professional behaviors in doctoral-level graduate students in the Applied Experimental & Human Factors Psychology program that are consistent with the program’s professional training goals. These goals include but are not limited to the development and demonstration of skills and abilities that enable graduating students in (1) research; (2) competently serve as innovative teachers/instructors in colleges and universities, and as presenters at local, regional, national, and international professional conferences; (3) prepare/review grants; (4) research methods/critique.

Requirements, Rationale and Objectives 

Successful completion of comprehensive examination requirements reflect the Program’s desire to insure overall breadth of training in the field of applied experimental & human factors psychology that are complemented by individually tailored professional training experiences and competencies consistent with a student’s professional career goals. The four professional domains outlined above (and detailed in the subsequent sections) are consistent with this intent. Students are required to complete all domains as well as required coursework (including electives) to be eligible for doctoral candidacy. The student must meet all domain requirements during his or her enrollment in the UCF AEHF Ph.D. program.  Work completed outside the program will not be considered for domain completion.  Some competency domains contain options, and students are free to select any option (see options under each domain in Table 1) in consultation with their faculty advisors.

1.  Students fulfill the Research domain by submitting an article to a refereed journal. Students must be first or solo author on empirical research that is either published or publishable in a peer- reviewed journal. If the student does not receive word on journal submission by 6 months or if article is rejected, the faculty committee will review the student’s work and determine if it fulfills the requirement.

Fulfillment of this component is intended to (a) complement the student’s graduate level course work in research methods, design, statistics, and on-going research practica, (b) hone conceptual and professional writing skills related to publishing findings in scholarly journals, (c) encourage students to submit completed scholarly works to journals for peer review, and (d) provide students with the opportunity to receive and react to comments offered by professional journal reviewers. Student must complete research and article while enrolled in the AEHF Program.  The student must report receipt of the peer review and complete and submit all forms for inclusion in their portfolio within thirty (30) days of receiving feedback from the journal.  The student must also inform his/her adviser, the Program Assistant, and the Program Director each time an activity is added to his/her Competency portfolio. Failure to meet the thirty day deadline will result in disqualification of the manuscript for satisfying this competency. The manuscript and editorial response may be reviewed by the AEHF committee to determine whether the student has satisfied this requirement.

2.  Fulfillment of the Teaching/ Professional Presentations domain requires first that all students complete the UCF Graduate Studies 2-day GTA Training session.  In addition, students must either serve as instructor of record for an undergraduate course at UCF or complete 5 formal presentations.  If the student opts for instructor of record of an undergraduate course, the student must do the following: Submit a syllabus, lecture notes, examinations, two course evaluations (mid and end-of-semester administered online by UCF, distributed by Psychology), as well as written feedback from the student’s faculty adviser or members of the student’s competency committee who directly observed or viewed videotapes of at least three lectures. If the student opts to conduct professional presentations, that student must complete 5 presentations in which he or she is an author and is also the primary presenter. Written feedback from the student’s faculty adviser or members of the student’s competency committee who directly observed or viewed videotapes of the five lectures must be available for review.  Professional presentations do not include poster presentations or classroom presentations (e.g., guest lecturer).

Fulfillment of the traditional Teaching domain is intended to provide students with (a) additional training and opportunities to develop instructional skills consistent with university level instruction, (b) the opportunity to receive and react to constructive comments concerning their developing instructional skills, (c) additional opportunities to learn and develop expertise in using newly developed technology and methods relevant to university level instruction (e.g., active learning groups, computer assisted technology, software programs that facilitate and complement traditional instructional activities), and (d) additional expertise in select areas of psychology to prepare them for future professional instructional opportunities following graduation from the University. The alternative option under this domain is intended to encourage students to engage in research studies beyond those required by the program and to present their findings at professional meetings. Fulfillment of this requirement is expected to promote research involvement throughout graduate training and promote student competency in (a) developing written submissions of completed empirical works, (b) oral presentations skills with professional audiences, (c) learning and using innovative technology relevant to paper/poster presentations, and (d) receiving and reacting to constructive comments offered by professionals.

Students satisfy this domain by accumulating points for teaching and/or professional presentation.  For presentations, the student must be the presenter. Points are assigned as follows:

  • One paper presentation (lecture) at National/International Conference (2 points)
  • One poster presentation at National/International Conference (1 point)
  • One paper presentation at Regional Conference (1 point)
  • One poster presentation at Regional Conference (1/2 point)
  • Teaching Assistant for a laboratory section (limit of one section per semester) (1 point)
  • Teaching a course as instructor of record (6 points)

The student must report each activity and complete and submit all forms for inclusion in their portfolio within thirty (30) days of the presentation or of the end of the semester in which the teaching activity occurred.  The student must also inform his/her adviser, the Program Assistant, and the Program Director each time an activity is added to his/her Competency portfolio. Failure to meet the thirty day deadline will result in disqualification of the activity for satisfying this competency. The activity may be reviewed by the AEHF committee to determine whether the student has satisfied this requirement.

3. Fulfillment of the Grant/Proposals domain is intended to (a) provide students with additional training and opportunities to critically review a specific area of empirical research related to applied experimental & human factors psychology, (b) hone conceptual and professional writing skills related to submitting grant applications to private and/or public granting agencies, (c) provide students with an opportunity to interact with department and university grant support facilities, (d) encourage extra-department financial support for conducting empirical studies (e.g., federal and private awards for dissertation research), and (e) provide students with an opportunity to receive and react to grant reviewer comments.  Fulfillment of this domain requires each student to submit an independent grant application that he or she has initiated.  The grant application must be submitted to a funding agency. If the grant is not awarded, its acceptability to fulfill the domain’s requirement will be reviewed by the HF faculty committee. 

The student must report submission of the grant proposal and complete and submit all forms for inclusion in their portfolio within thirty (30) days of submission.  The student must also inform his/her advisor, the Program Assistant, and the Program Director each time an activity is added to his/her Competency portfolio. Failure to meet the thirty day deadline will result in disqualification of the grant proposal for satisfying this competency. The proposal may be reviewed by the AEHF committee to determine whether the student has satisfied this requirement.

4. Fulfillment of the Research Methods domain requires all students to take an in-class exam. This exam will be administered only in the Summer semester of each year. Students may petition the AEHF committee for exemption from this exam.  The minimum requirement is a GPA=3.75 across the three required research methods courses (i.e., PSY 7217C Advanced Research Methodology I; PSY 7218C Advanced Research Methodology II; PSY 7219C Advanced Research Methods III). Note that if a student enrolls in any of these courses a second time, they may not be exempted from the exam.

Procedures and Time Guidelines for Completing the Comprehensive Examination

Students admitted to the PhD Applied Experimental and Human Factors Program will complete all of the four professional activity domain options (Research, Teaching/Professional Presentations, Grant Proposals, and Research Methods/Critique) to fulfill the professional competency requirements. Students are strongly encouraged to discuss their preferences and planned course for fulfilling these requirements with their academic advisers. Students admitted to the PhD Applied Experimental and Human Factors Program will not be able to fulfill the requirements with previous work completed at any institution previous to their enrollment in the AEHF PhD program at the University of Central Florida.

Successful completion of the comprehensive examination criteria must be completed before proposing the dissertation. The deadlines for completion of each competency are indicated in the Table 1. Each student’s comprehensive examination committee (which may be different from or identical to the dissertation committee) will determine whether the student has successfully fulfilled the requirements of the comprehensive examination based on written grading procedures to be outlined by the AEHF faculty.  Students are strongly encouraged to consult with their adviser in selecting a comprehensive examination committee.  One consideration in identifying potential committee members is the research topic you select to meet the domains 1 and 3.

A written summary of the results and the student’s Professional Activity Domain dossier will be forwarded to the Applied Experimental and Human Factors Program faculty for review and final approval. The Applied Experimental and Human Factors Program faculty will review each submitted dossier within a 3-week time interval. The Director of the Applied Experimental and Human Factors Program will notify students in writing following the successful completion of comprehensive examination requirements. Students may formally propose their dissertation following written notification that they have completed the comprehensive examination requirements.

Graduate Research: Doctoral Dissertation

Prior to enrollment into PSY 7980 Doctoral Dissertation, you must have passed candidacy and your dissertation committee must be reviewed and approved by the College of Sciences Associate Dean of Graduate Studies. This form can be found online at: http://www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/files/

Doctoral students engaging in dissertation research must be continuously enrolled in at least three hours of PSY 7980 every semester, including summers, until they successfully defend and submit their dissertation to the University Thesis Editor.

Students will complete a minimum of 15 dissertation credit hours to meet the requirements for graduation. 

Program Guidelines

All dissertations must involve the collection and analysis of original data. In exceptional circumstances, the use of an archival data set may be accepted through petition to the Graduate Committee. Oral presentation of the dissertation/dissertation prospectus must be made to the Dissertation/ Dissertation Committee for approval prior to initiating the research. The proposal generally includes the following: (a) title, (b) introduction to the problem, (c) comprehensive review of relevant literature, (d) establishing the uniqueness of the study, (e) theoretical background and hypotheses, (f) planned methodology, and (g) planned data analytic approach. Students are encouraged to write their dissertation proposal and dissertation using APA publication style(see APA Publication Manual, 6th edition) and to submit their completed research to relevant professional journals in their field of research. An appendix to the dissertation and/or dissertation may be used to include a more comprehensive literature review as determined by the student's committee members. After submitting a written proposal to the Dissertation/Dissertation Committee, the committee will meet with the student to discuss and evaluate the proposal. The approval of the proposal by a majority of committee members indicates that the committee members find the research to be original and appropriate, the literature review to be accurate and appropriately comprehensive, and the research design/planned data analytic strategy to be appropriate for the study.

After receiving committee approval for the thesis/dissertation, all students must receive approval from the University’s Institutional Review Board (IRB) before data can be collected from human participants. Information about this process can be obtained from the Office of Research (www.research.ucf.edu). Failure to obtain this prior approval could jeopardize receipt of the student's degree. 

Students should refer to the Graduate Studies Thesis and Dissertation Manual which describes UCF’s formatting requirements for dissertations and outlines the steps graduate students must follow to submit their dissertations to Graduate Studies for binding. Graduate students can obtain the manual from the UCF Graduate Studies website (www.graduate.ucf.edu). 

Dissertation Committee Composition

Doctoral students must establish a Dissertation Committee prior to the Candidacy Examination. The Committee will consist of a minimum of four members. At least three members must be qualified regular faculty members from the student's department at UCF, one of whom must serve as the chair of the committee. One member must be from either outside the student's department at UCF or outside the university.  It is likely that the student’s advisor will serve as the chair of the committee.  Students are therefore strongly encouraged to consult with their adviser in identifying potential committee members.

All members vote on acceptance or rejection of the dissertation proposal and the final dissertation. The dissertation proposal and final dissertation must be approved by a majority of the committee.

Dissertation Committee/Candidacy Status Form:

http://www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/files/

These approval forms should be completed and submitted to the AEHF program assistant.  Refer to the above website for detailed information.

Time Limitation and Deadlines for Dissertation Completion

A student has seven years from the date of admission to the doctoral program to complete the Ph.D. requirements. If the seven-year limit is exceeded, the candidacy examinations as well as course work may need to be repeated.

Deadline, Dissertation Proposal Defense: End of eighth semester in Program (excluding summers)

Deadline, Dissertation Defense: End of eleventh semester in Program (excluding summers)

    Master of Arts in Applied Experimental and Human Factors Psychology

    Students enrolled in the Applied Experimental and Human Factors (AEHF) PhD track may elect to earn a Master of Arts in AEHF Psychology in route to their doctorate. This is a nonterminal master's degree available only to students in the AEHF Psychology PhD track.

    Additional Program Requirements

    The MA in AEHF Psychology requires a total of 60 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree, as well as successful completion of the candidacy examination that qualifies the student for candidacy status within the AEHF Psychology PhD. All AEHF MA students take the same credit hours of core courses (less the 15 hour dissertation requirement) as well as and 18 credit hours of electives. All required courses and selected electives are described in the PhD program of study above.

    Note: The MA in AEHF cannot be pursued if a master’s in psychology or master’s in modeling and simulation has already been awarded.


    Timeline for Completion

    The PhD is designed to be obtained in 5-6 years of full-time study from the baccalaureate level and in 2-3 years from the master’s level. (A minimum of one year full-time student status is required.) For students who enter with a baccalaureate degree, the program requires a minimum of 75 credit hours. Students who enter with a master’s degree will be granted up to 30 hours of transfer credit with approval of the program faculty, and will also be required to complete a minimum of 60 credit hours at UCF.

    Timeline For Completion of Degree Program: 5 Year Schedule

    Doctoral Program Courses

    Year of Graduate Training
    FallSpringSummer
    • EXP 5256  Human Factors I (3)
    • PSY 7217C Advanced Research Methodology I (4)
    • EXP 6506 Human Cognition & Learning (3)
     
    • EXP 6257  Human Factors II (3)
    • PSY 7218C Advanced Research Methodology II (4)
    • EXP 5208 Sensation & Perception (3)
     
    • Elective (3) ;AND EXP 6918 Directed Research (3) or

      EXP 6918 Directed Research (6)

     
    Semester Total: 10 credit hoursSemester Total: 10 credit hoursSemester Total: 6 credit hours
    2nd Year of Graduate Training – Entered program on an EVEN Year
    FallSpringSummer
    • EXP 6258 Human Factors III (3)
    • PSY 7219C Advanced Research Methodology III (4)
    • EXP 6255 Human Performance (3)
     
    • PSB 5005 Physiological Psychology (3)
    • EXP 7089 Human Factors Professional Issues (3)
    • EXP 6116 Visual Performance (3)
     
    • Elective (3) AND EXP 6918 Directed Research (3) or EXP 6918 Directed Research (6)
     
    Semester Total: 10 credit hours Semester Total: 9 credit hoursSemester Total: 6 credit hours     
    2nd Year of Graduate Training - Entered Program on an Odd Year 
    FallSpringSummer
    • EXP 6258  Human Factors III (3)

    • PSY 7219C  Advanced Research Methodology III (4)

    • EXP 6255  Human Performance (3)

    • PSB 5005  Physiological Psychology (3)

    • Elective (3)

    • EXP 6116  Visual Performance (3)

    • Elective (3) AND EXP 6918 Directed Research (3) or

      EXP 6918 Directed Research (6)

    Semester Total: 10 credit hoursSemester Total: 9 credit hoursSemester Total: 6 credit hours
    3rd Year of Graduate Training– Entered program on an EVEN Year 
    FallSpringSummer
    • Elective (3)

    • Elective (3)

    • Elective (3)

    • EXP 6541  Advance Human Computer Interaction (3)

    • Elective (3)

    • Elective (3)

    • Elective (3) AND EXP 6918 Directed Research (3) or

      EXP 6918 Directed Research (6)

    Semester Total: 9 credit hoursSemester Total: 9 credit hoursSemester Total: 6 credit hours
    3rd Year of Graduate Training– Entered program on an ODD Year 
    FallSpringSummer
    • Elective (3)

    • Elective (3)

    • Elective (3)

     
    • EXP 6541  Advance Human Computer Interaction (3)

    • Elective (3)

    • Elective (3)

     
    • Elective (3) AND EXP 6918 Directed Research (3) or

      EXP 6918 Directed Research (6)

     
    Semester Total: 9 credit hoursSemester Total: 9 credit hoursSemester Total: 6 credit hours
    4th Year of Graduate Teaching 
    FallSpringSummer
    • PSY 7980 Doctoral Dissertation
    • PSY 7980  Doctoral Dissertation (3)
    • PSY 7980 Doctoral Dissertation (3)
    Semester Total: 3 credit hoursSemester Total: 3 credit hoursSemester Total: 3 credit hours
    5th Year of Graduate Training
    FallSpring
    • PSY 7980 Doctoral Dissertation (3)
     
    • 3 credit hours
     
    Semester Total: 3 credit hoursSemester Total: 3 credit hours

    A complete listing of courses at UCF can be found at: www.graduate.ucf.edu/CurrentGradCatalog/content/Courses/

    Examination Requirements

    Examinations:  Competency Requirements

    Comprehensive Examinations are detailed below and involve the completion of five professional activity/competency domains.

    Table 1. Professional Activity/Competency Domains

    Domain 1: Research

    1. Published/ Publishable Article (1st author)

    Deadline: End of sixth semester in Program (excluding summers)

    Domain 2: Teaching/Professional Presentations

    a. Undergraduate Instructor Experience, or

    b. Professional Presentations

    Deadline: End of sixth semester in Program (excluding summers)

    Domain 3: Grant/Proposals

    1. Grant Proposal

    Deadline: End of fourth semester in Program (excluding summers)

    Domain 4: Research Methods

    a. In class test administration will be offered in fall semester

    Deadline: End of fourth semester in Program (excluding summers)

    Purpose

    The purpose of the qualifying and comprehensive examination is to develop and assess competency of professional behaviors in doctoral-level graduate students in the Applied Experimental & Human Factors Psychology program that are consistent with the program’s professional training goals. These goals include but are not limited to the development and demonstration of skills and abilities that enable graduating students in (1) research; (2) competently serve as innovative teachers/instructors in colleges and universities, and as presenters at local, regional, national, and international professional conferences; (3) prepare/review grants; (4) research methods/critique.

    Requirements, Rationale and Objectives

    Successful completion of comprehensive examination requirements reflect the Program’s desire to insure overall breadth of training in the field of applied experimental & human factors psychology that are complemented by individually tailored professional training experiences and competencies consistent with a student’s professional career goals. The four professional domains outlined above (and detailed in the subsequent sections) are consistent with this intent. Students are required to complete all domains as well as required coursework (including electives) to be eligible for doctoral candidacy. The student must meet all domain requirements during his or her enrollment in the UCF AEHF PhD program.  Work completed outside the program will not be considered for domain completion.  Some competency domains contain options, and students are free to select any option (see options under each domain in Table 1) in consultation with their faculty advisors.

    1.  Students fulfill the Research domain by submitting an article to a refereed journal. Students must be first or solo author on empirical research that is either published or publishable in a peer- reviewed journal. If the student does not receive word on journal submission by 6 months or if article is rejected, the faculty committee will review the student’s work and determine if it fulfills the requirement.

    Fulfillment of this component is intended to (a) complement the student’s graduate level course work in research methods, design, statistics, and on-going research practica, (b) hone conceptual and professional writing skills related to publishing findings in scholarly journals, (c) encourage students to submit completed scholarly works to journals for peer review, and (d) provide students with the opportunity to receive and react to comments offered by professional journal reviewers. Student must complete research and article while enrolled in the AEHF Program.  The student must report receipt of the peer review and complete and submit all forms for inclusion in their portfolio within thirty (30) days of receiving feedback from the journal.  The student must also inform his/her advisor, the Program Assistant, and the Program Director each time an activity is added to his/her Competency portfolio. Failure to meet the thirty day deadline will result in disqualification of the manuscript for satisfying this competency. The manuscript and editorial response may be reviewed by the AEHF committee to determine whether the student has satisfied this requirement.

    2.  Fulfillment of the Teaching/ Professional Presentations domain requires first that all students complete the UCF Graduate Studies 2-day GTA Training session.  In addition, students must either serve as instructor of record for an undergraduate course at UCF or complete 5 formal presentations.  If the student opts for instructor of record of an undergraduate course, the student must do the following: Submit a syllabus, lecture notes, examinations, two course evaluations (mid and end-of-semester administered online by UCF, distributed by Psychology), as well as written feedback from the student’s faculty advisor or members of the student’s competency committee who directly observed or viewed videotapes of at least three lectures. If the student opts to conduct professional presentations, that student must complete 5 presentations in which he or she is an author and is also the primary presenter. Written feedback from the student’s faculty advisor or members of the student’s competency committee who directly observed or viewed videotapes of the five lectures must be available for review. Professional presentations do not include poster presentations or classroom presentations (e.g., guest lecturer).

    Fulfillment of the traditional Teaching domain s intended to provide students with (a) additional training and opportunities to develop instructional skills consistent with university level instruction, (b) the opportunity to receive and react to constructive comments concerning their developing instructional skills, (c) additional opportunities to learn and develop expertise in using newly developed technology and methods relevant to university level instruction (e.g., active learning groups, computer assisted technology, software programs that facilitate and complement traditional instructional activities), and (d) additional expertise in select areas of psychology to prepare them for future professional instructional opportunities following graduation from the University. The alternative option under this domain is intended to encourage students to engage in research studies beyond those required by the program and to present their findings at professional meetings. Fulfillment of this requirement is expected to promote research involvement throughout graduate training and promote student competency in (a) developing written submissions of completed empirical works, (b) oral presentations skills with professional audiences, (c) learning and using innovative technology relevant to paper/poster presentations, and (d) receiving and reacting to constructive comments offered by professionals.

    Students satisfy this domain by accumulating points for teaching and/or professional presentation.  For presentations, the student must be the presenter. Points are assigned as follows:

    Activity

    Points

    One paper presentation (lecture) at National/International conference

    2

    One poster presentation at National/International conference

    1

    One paper  presentation at regional conference

    1

    One poster  presentation at regional conference

    1/2

    Teaching Assistant for a laboratory section (limit of one section per semester)

    1

    Teaching a course as instructor of record

    6

    The student must report each activity and complete and submit all forms for inclusion in their portfolio within thirty (30) days of the presentation or of the end of the semester in which the teaching activity occurred.  The student must also inform his/her advisor, the Program Assistant, and the Program Director each time an activity is added to his/her Competency portfolio. Failure to meet the thirty day deadline will result in disqualification of the activity for satisfying this competency. The activity may be reviewed by the AEHF committee to determine whether the student has satisfied this requirement.

    3. Fulfillment of the Grant/Proposals domain is intended to (a) provide students with additional training and opportunities to critically review a specific area of empirical research related to applied experimental & human factors psychology, (b) hone conceptual and professional writing skills related to submitting grant applications to private and/or public granting agencies, (c) provide students with an opportunity to interact with department and university grant support facilities, (d) encourage extra-department financial support for conducting empirical studies (e.g., federal and private awards for dissertation research), and (e) provide students with an opportunity to receive and react to grant reviewer comments.  . Fulfillment of this domain requires each student to submit an independent grant application that he or she has initiated.  The grant application must be submitted to a funding agency. If the grant is not awarded, its acceptability to fulfill the domain’s requirement will be reviewed by the HF faculty committee.

    The student must report submission of the grant proposal and complete and submit all forms for inclusion in their portfolio within thirty (30) days of submission.  The student must also inform his/her advisor, the Program Assistant, and the Program Director each time an activity is added to his/her Competency portfolio. Failure to meet the thirty day deadline will result in disqualification of the grant proposal for satisfying this competency. The proposal may be reviewed by the AEHF committee to determine whether the student has satisfied this requirement.

    4. Fulfillment of the Research Methods domain requires all students to take an in-class exam. This exam will be administered only in the Summer semester of each year. Students may petition the AEHF committee for exemption from this exam.  The minimum requirement is a GPA=3.75 across the three required research methods courses (i.e., PSY 7217C Advanced Research Methodology I; PSY 7218C Advanced Research Methodology II; PSY 7219C Advanced Research Methods III). Note that if a student enrolls in any of these courses a second time, they may not be exempted from the exam.

    Procedures and Time Guidelines for Completing the Comprehensive Examination

    Students admitted to the PhD Applied Experimental and Human Factors Program will complete all of the four professional activity domain options (Research, Teaching/Professional Presentations, Grant Proposals, and Research Methods/Critique) to fulfill the professional competency requirements. Students are strongly encouraged to discuss their preferences and planned course for fulfilling these requirements with their academic advisors. Students admitted to the Ph.D. Applied Experimental and Human Factors Program will not be able to fulfill the requirements with previous work completed at any institution previous to their enrollment in the AEHF PhD program at the University of Central Florida (UCF).

    Successful completion of the comprehensive examination criteria must be completed before proposing the dissertation. The deadlines for completion of each competency are indicated in the Table 1. Each student’s comprehensive examination committee (which may be different from or identical to the dissertation committee) will determine whether the student has successfully fulfilled the requirements of the comprehensive examination based on written grading procedures to be outlined by the AEHF faculty.  Students are strongly encouraged to consult with their advisor in selecting a comprehensive examination committee. One consideration in identifying potential committee members is the research topic you select to meet the domains 1 and 3.

    A written summary of the results and the student’s Professional Activity Domain dossier will be forwarded to the Applied Experimental and Human Factors Program faculty for review and final approval. The Applied Experimental and Human Factors Program faculty will review each submitted dossier within a 3-week time interval. The Director of the Applied Experimental and Human Factors Program will notify students in writing following the successful completion of comprehensive examination requirements. Students may formally propose their dissertation following written notification that they have completed the comprehensive examination requirements.

    Dissertation Requirements

    Graduate Research: Doctoral Dissertation

    Prior to enrollment into PSY 7980 Doctoral Dissertation, you must have passed candidacy and your dissertation committee must be reviewed and approved by the College of Sciences Associate Dean of Graduate Studies. This form can be found online at: www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/files/

    Doctoral students engaging in dissertation research must be continuously enrolled in at least three hours of PSY 7980 every semester, including summers, until they successfully defend and submit their dissertation to the University Thesis Editor.

    Students will complete a minimum of 15 dissertation credit hours to meet the requirements for graduation.

    Program Guidelines

    All dissertations must involve the collection and analysis of original data. In exceptional circumstances, the use of an archival data set may be accepted through petition to the Graduate Committee. Oral presentation of the dissertation/dissertation prospectus must be made to the Dissertation/ Dissertation Committee for approval prior to initiating the research. The proposal generally includes the following: (a) title, (b) introduction to the problem, (c) comprehensive review of relevant literature, (d) establishing the uniqueness of the study, (e) theoretical background and hypotheses, (f) planned methodology, and (g) planned data analytic approach. Students are encouraged to write their dissertation proposal and dissertation using APA publication style (see APA Publication Manual, 6th edition) and to submit their completed research to relevant professional journals in their field of research. An appendix to the dissertation and/or dissertation may be used to include a more comprehensive literature review as determined by the student's committee members. After submitting a written proposal to the Dissertation/Dissertation Committee, the committee will meet with the student to discuss and evaluate the proposal. The approval of the proposal by a majority of committee members indicates that the committee members find the research to be original and appropriate, the literature review to be accurate and appropriately comprehensive, and the research design/planned data analytic strategy to be appropriate for the study.

    After receiving committee approval for the thesis/dissertation, all students must receive approval from the University’s Institutional Review Board (IRB) before data can be collected from human participants. Information about this process can be obtained from the Office of Research (www.research.ucf.edu). Failure to obtain this prior approval could jeopardize receipt of the student's degree.

    Students should refer to the Graduate Studies Thesis and Dissertation Manual which describes UCF’s formatting requirements for dissertations and outlines the steps graduate students must follow to submit their dissertations to Graduate Studies for binding. Graduate students can obtain the manual from the UCF Graduate Studies website (www.graduate.ucf.edu).

    Dissertation Committee Composition

    Doctoral students must establish a Dissertation Committee prior to the Candidacy Examination. The Committee will consist of a minimum of four members. At least three members must be qualified regular faculty members from the student's department at UCF, one of whom must serve as the chair of the committee. One member must be from either outside the student's department at UCF or outside the university.  It is likely that the student’s advisor will serve as the chair of the committee.  Students are therefore strongly encouraged to consult with their advisor in identifying potential committee members.

    All members vote on acceptance or rejection of the dissertation proposal and the final dissertation. The dissertation proposal and final dissertation must be approved by a majority of the committee.

    Dissertation Committee / Candidacy Status Form

    www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/files/

    These approval forms should be completed and submitted to the AEHF program assistant.  Refer to the above website for detailed information.

    Time Limitation and Deadlines for Dissertation Completion

    A student has seven years from the date of admission to the doctoral program to complete the PhD requirements. If the seven-year limit is exceeded, the candidacy examinations as well as course work may need to be repeated.

    Deadline, Dissertation Proposal Defense: End of 8th semester in Program (excluding summers)

    Deadline, Dissertation Defense: End of 11th semester in Program (excluding summers)

    Project

    First Year Research Project

    In the first year, all students must do a laboratory research project (the First Year Project) that includes at least one empirical study. The project must be approved and will be supervised by the student’s advisor. Two weeks from the start date of the first semester of the second year (if this date falls on a weekend or academic holiday the due date will be the first day following on which University classes are in session), the student must provide a written paper describing their work structured in accordance with APA guidelines and including all sections necessary for a typical journal submission in their field.  It should not exceed 20 pages of text (exclusive of References, Tables, and Figures). Approval of the paper is required by two members of the Applied Experimental and Human Factors Area faculty (one of whom will be the student’s advisor).   Additionally, the student must undergo a 20 minute oral examination based on the written report. This examination will be in the format of an academic talk delivered to area faculty and students that will occur approximately 2 weeks following submission of the First Year Paper. Satisfactory performance on both the paper and oral examination is required to maintain good standing in the program. Cases in which performance is deemed unsatisfactory will result in academic probation with a retention plan for the student, who must successfully complete this plan to maintain status in the program.  However, if a student already on academic probation delivers a first year project (either paper or talk) that is deemed unsatisfactory then they may be removed from the program at the discretion of the program director.

    Graduate Research

    Specialty Training Emphasis/Research Labs & Opportunities

    Cognitive Engineering and Decision Lab focuses on basic and applied research into how people make decisions and how they learn to classify or identify elements of their environment (e.g., diagnostic judgments).  A long-term goal is to understand these cognitive behaviors well enough to apply our understanding to operational environments in a variety of domains.  This research has implications for designing better training methods and for influencing design of interactive technologies.  The lab emphasizes a cognitive-modeling approach to understanding and influencing learning and behavior.  The lab also emphasizes the use of methods from cognitive neuroscience for understanding the effects of cognitive workload and stress on decision making.  Director: Dr. Corey Bohil

    The UCF Recent and Emerging Technology Research Organization (RETRO) Lab is dedicated to the academic study of virtual words and interactive media, including their use for educational and training purposes. We are interested in blending best practices and innovations in interactive media product development with human-computer interaction and the science of learning and training. RETRO is a part of both the UCF Psychology Department and the Institute for Simulation and Training. Students and professionals across many disciplines compose our two teams – the researchers and the developers, Under the guidance of Drs. Jan Cannon-Bowers and Clint Bowers.

    Minds in Technology, Machines in Thought (MIT2) Laboratory focuses on issues of stress, workload and fatigue in dynamic, hazardous environments with particular attention to military applications. We are a virtual research lab, including the Minds in Technology, Machines in Thought (MIT2) Labs at the University of Central Florida, the Cognitive Sciences Lab at George Mason University, Linkoping University, Team Performance Laboratory (UCF) and the Florida Institute of Technology. The MIT2 affiliate labs at UCF include the MURI Lab, the Transportation Research Group (TRG), and the Center for Applied Human Factors in Aviation (CAHFA). The Laboratory works under a DOD research grant titled “Mitigating Stress, Workload, and Fatigue in the Electronic Battlefield.” Along with assistance from the Army Research Lab, the Army Research Institute, the Army Research Office, and the other affiliated research labs maintained by the U.S. Department of Defense, we hope to make great strides towards understanding and alleviating some of the stressors that are encountered by today’s infantry forces. Please view our website at www.mit.ucf.edu. Director: Dr. Peter A Hancock

    Team Performance Laboratory (TPL) specializes in basic and applied principles of both individual and team performance, processes, and training in a number of military and civilian domains (e.g. aviation, human robot interaction, and homeland security). Current projects include, (a) in aviation, the study of advanced cockpit automation under NextGen and of improved methods for aircrew training, (b), in human-robot interaction, investigations of autonomy, shared mental models, and situation awareness in mixed human-robot teams, and (c), in homeland security, an investigation into the improvement of perceptual skills through training. Please view our website at www.tpl.ucf.edu. Director: Dr. Florian Jentsch

    FAA/UCF Partnership for Aviation Team Training Research specializes in research in aviation training issues and conducts research for both military and commercial aviation. Director: Dr. Florian Jentsch.

    Center for Applied Human Factors in Aviation (CAHFA) focuses its research on making aeronautical systems safer and easier to use by achieving sophistication without complication. Director: Dr. Mustapha Mouloua

    Transportation Research Group is dedicated to enhancing surface transportation safety and efficiency through applied research, design validation and training systems support. UCF provides TRG with the multidisciplinary capabilities of a major university, including academic strengths in applied psychology and engineering. TRG research is concerned with the behavioral, environmental and engineering factors in traffic safety. Specific areas of research include driving simulation, training, high-risk drivers, in-vehicle navigational systems, increased congestion, driver workload, driver fatigue, high speed pursuit, and driving under the influence of alcohol and drugs. The TRG research facilities consist of a wide variety of laboratories and centers throughout the university. These include the Visual Performance Laboratory, Human Factors Research Laboratory, The Florida Alliance for Assistive Services and Technology Laboratory, The Team Performance Laboratory, The Center for Applied Human Factors in Aviation, The Center for Advanced Transportation Simulation Systems, and the Institute for Simulation and Training. Director: Dr. Mustapha Mouloua

    Applied Cognition and Aging Lab (ACAL) focuses on understanding the perceptual and cognitive processes that guide human behavior throughout the lifespan. Using that knowledge, we then devise strategies to augment human performance in a variety of “every day” (and not so “every day”) tasks and situations, generally through training interventions and technological supplementation.   The lab utilizes a number of experimental techniques including traditional behavioral paradigms, eye tracking, virtual reality, driving simulation, and neuroimaging.   Director: Dr. Mark Neider Lab website: www.markneider.com/

    Visual Performance Laboratory focuses on research into human vision and visual performance. Director: Edward Rinalducci

    Applied Cognition and Technology Laboratory (ACAT) is a collaboration between a cognitive psychologist and a social psychologist. Research examines human interactions with intelligent non-humans, including robots, computers, and animals. Anthropomorphism and its implications for design are a key part of this research. Director: Dr. Valerie Sims.

    Performance Research Laboratory (PeRL) is involved in research on the performance, workload, and stress associated with performance of cognitive tasks. Both group and individual differences are investigated in research on human performance. Of particular interest is the interaction between the characteristics (trait and state) of individuals and the characteristics of the tasks they perform. Director: Dr. James Szalma.

    Other Research Opportunities available:

    Institute for Simulation and Training (IST) is an internationally recognized research institute that focuses on advancing modeling and simulation technology and increasing our understanding of simulation’s role in training and education. Founded in 1982, IST is one of the nations leading research centers for simulation, training, modeling and virtual reality research for both defense and commercial applications. IST employs full-time researchers and support personnel, part-time faculty researchers (many of whom have joint appointments in other departments), and numerous graduate and undergraduate students. Located in a dynamic, growing field, supported by government and industry sponsors, and charged with identifying new directions for this technology IST is helping to define the future of simulation and training.

    The Institute for Simulation and Training is located in the Central Florida Research Park, adjacent to the University of Central Florida in Orlando. Central Florida is noted for its dense population of high-tech companies engaged in many different aspects of simulation and training. More than 140 simulation and training companies have facilities in the Central Florida area. This base gives IST a broad range of resources and experiences from which to draw. The Naval Air Warfare Center Training System Division (NAVAIR Orlando), U.S. Army Simulation, Training, and Instrumentation Command (STRICOM), Air Force Agency for Modeling and Simulation and Marine Liaison Office (Trainers and Simulators) are also located in the Research Park within walking distance of IST.

    The Research Park at UCF houses numerous other sites for gaining practical experience in the field of human factors, including both military and industry organizations.

    Financial Support

    Financial Support

    The Department of Psychology makes every effort to obtain financial support for graduate students, to the extent that funds are available. Sources of funds include: departmental teaching and research apprenticeships and departmentally arranged support from outside sources such as grants. Funds will be distributed across students in an equitable manner. However, since sources of funds are often limited, financial support cannot be guaranteed to all students, regardless of year in the program or excellence of performance.

    Tuition waivers are intended for full time students in good standing with a graduate GPA of 3.0 or higher. The student must be employed as a GTA, GRA or GA for at least 10 hours/week (.25 FTE) on average, or receiving a fellowship that includes tuition support.  Please refer to the current Graduate Catalog for additional rules and stipulations of tuition waivers.

    www.graduate.ucf.edu/CurrentGradCatalog/content/Financial/index.cfm#Graduate%20Tuition%20Support

    In addition to assistantships, graduate students may be eligible for fellowships, awards, loans, and work/study programs. Students should consult the Graduate Catalog or UCF financial aid office, finaid.ucf.edu for descriptions and requirements of graduate financial support.

    Full time is considered 9 credits per semester for usual time and 3 credits in the dissertation period in the Psychology Department. However, it is individual student’s responsibility to check the required units to retain any financial aids.

    International Students

    Several types of employment are available to international students, including on-campus employment. For more information about the types of employment available to international students, and the requirements and restrictions based in visa-type, please see the International Affairs and Global Strategies' website: www.intl.ucf.edu

    Assistantships and Tuition Waivers

    For complete information about university assistantship and tuition waivers, please see the UCF Graduate Catalog: www.graduate.ucf.edu/currentGradCatalog/ > Financial Information

    To be employed and to maintain employment in a graduate position, the student must be enrolled full time and meet all of the training requirements and/or conditions of employment.

    To be awarded and continue receipt of tuition remission, the student must be enrolled full time and either employed in a graduate position (GTA, GRA, GA), or receiving a University fellowship.

    Doctoral students can be offered tuition remission for a maximum of twelve semesters (for doctoral student beyond the master’s degree) or fifteen semesters (for doctoral students without a master’s degree).

    Students can apply for assistantships and tuition remission every year, but priority is given to incoming students, international students (who have more restrictions on their employment), and second year students.  After the second year, students should be marketable for discipline-related employment on individual faculty member contracts and grants, internships, and other part-time outside employment.  Develop your curriculum vitae and resume now, update it regularly, and start seeking outside employment starting year 3 of the program.  If a departmental assistantship is desired beyond the second year, make your desire known when asked.  If there are opportunities for third-year students or beyond, they will be distributed in year priority (with newer students having the highest priority). 

    GTA Training Requirements

    If the student is hired in the position of Graduate Teaching Associate, Assistant or Graders, there are training requirements that must be met in order for the contract to be processed. Associates must complete a face-to-face training and online GT Assistant training and legal module. Associates must also have completed at least 18 hours of graduate courses in the discipline they will be teaching. Students who are employed as Graders are required to complete the online legal module. These services are offered by the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning (FCTL) and more information can be found at the following website: fctl.ucf.edu > Events > GTA Programs

    International students who will be hired in GTA positions must be proficient at speaking English. This is determined by successfully passing the SPEAK test.  This test (also known as the Oral Proficiency Exam) is administered by the Center for Multicultural and Multilingual Services (CMMS). For international student to register for or inquire about the SPEAK examination, please visit: www.graduate.ucf.edu/pagegen/index.cfm?PageID=160  

    GTA Performance Appraisal

    At the completion of each semester the student is employed as a GTA, the student’s performance will be evaluated by the faculty advisor. These assessments will be used to review strengths and weaknesses in the student’s performance in preparation for future employment.

    Graduate Student Associations

    Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

    The Society was founded in 1957 as the Human Factors Society of America. The Society's mission is to promote the discovery and exchange of knowledge concerning the characteristics of human beings that are applicable to the design of systems and devices of all kinds.

    The Society furthers serious consideration of knowledge about the assignment of appropriate functions for humans and machines, whether people serve as operators, maintainers, or users in the system. And, it advocates systematic use of such knowledge to achieve compatibility in the design of interactive systems of people, machines, and environments to ensure their effectiveness, safety, and ease of performance.

    The Society encourages education and training for those entering the human factors and ergonomics profession and for those who conceive, design, develop, manufacture, test, manage, and participate in systems. For more information on the society go to www.hfes.org.

    UCF Student Chapter of the HFES

    Members of the UCF Student Chapter of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES) are mostly graduate students in the Applied Experimental and Human Factors Psychology and Industrial Engineering programs. The Student Chapter gives members the opportunity to further their professional goals by encouraging members to attend conferences and sponsoring colloquia where members have the opportunity to meet the foremost researchers in the field.

    Graduate Student Association (GSA)

    This is UCF's graduate organization committed to enrich graduate students' personal, educational and professional experience. To learn more or get involved, please visit www.gsa.ucf.edu.

    For a list of all psychology related student groups visit the Organizations webpage on the Psychology Department website.

    Professional Development

    Work Policy

    The Applied Experimental and Human Factors Psychology PhD program at University of Central Florida expects students to be full time students, so it is not recommended to get employment that requires more than 20 hours/week during the completion of the program.

    Students with 10 hours/week or 20 hours/week department assistantship are eligible to receive tuition remission in the form of a waiver or funds (excluding the student fees).

    First year students are usually assigned as GTA (graduate teaching assistant) position and more advanced experienced students will be assigned as GTA (assistant or associate) or GRA (graduate research assistant).

    In order for students to be employed as Graduate Teaching Assistant, they must first complete the required UCF GTA Workshop. In order for students to be employed as Graduate Teaching Associate, students are also required to complete 18 hours of coursework in the discipline they intend to teach. 

    The Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning (FCTL) offers an optional Graduate Teaching Assistant Certificate Program. More information about GTA training and the GTA Certificate are available from the FCTL website (www.fctl.ucf.edu).

    If English is a second language, in order to be hired as a GTA the student must take and pass an Oral Proficiency Exam (also known as the "SPEAK Test").  This is in addition to attending this GTA Workshop.  This test is administered by the Center for Multilingual Multicultural Studies and takes about 20 minutes.  For more information please visit the following website: www.students.graduate.ucf.edu/SPEAK_test/

    Special Award Recognition

    Following are various awards and fellowships available for qualified students at UCF.

    University Awards

    Each year, students can submit a portfolio for nomination of College and University level awards of excellence. These are intended to showcase student excellence in academic achievement, teaching, research, leadership, and community service.

    Award for Excellence by a Graduate Teaching Assistant

    For students who provide teaching support and assistance under the direction of a lead teacher. This award focuses on the extent and quality of the assistance provided by the student to the lead instructor and the students in the class. (Not intended for students who are instructor of record)

    Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Teaching

    For students who serve as instructors of record and have independent classroom responsibilities. The focus of this award is on the quality of the student’s teaching and the academic contributions of those activities.

    Award for Outstanding Dissertation

    To recognize doctoral students for excellence in the dissertation. The focus of this award is on the quality and contribution of the student's dissertation. Excellence of the dissertation may be demonstrated by evidences such as, but not limited to: publications in refereed journals, awards and recognitions from professional organizations, and praise from faculty members and other colleagues in the field.

    Order of Pegasus

    This selective program recognizes exemplary performance by graduate students in the areas of academic achievement, professional or community service, leadership, and publication or research experiences. Because of the breadth of accomplishments required for this award, the Order of Pegasus is the most prestigious and significant student award that can be attained at the university. For more information, visit the Order of Pegasus website.

    For more information about these awards, please reference the following link: www.graduate.ucf.edu/GradAwards/.

    Fellowships

    Trustee Doctoral Fellowship

    Available to new doctoral students who are a U.S. citizen, resident alien, or international

    Requires GRE score of at least 1300 on the combined verbal-quantitative sections, or GMAT score of at least 630

    Requires evidence of experience in the field; evidence of awards, recognition, or honors; evidence of professional contributions and achievements

    Provides $25,000 fellowship ($12,500/term) and full tuition (not local fees) per year for 4 years; provides summer tuition (not local fees) for 6 hours

    Presidential Doctoral Fellowship 

    Available to new doctoral students who are a U.S. citizen or resident alien

    Requires GRE score of at least 1150 on the combined verbal-quantitative sections, or GMAT score of at least 570

    Requires evidence of experience in the field; evidence of awards, recognition, or honors; evidence of professional contributions and achievements

    Provides $17,000 fellowship ($8,500/term) and full tuition (not local fees) per year for 4 years; provides summer tuition (not local fees) for 6 hours

    For more information about the Trustee Fellowship, please reference the following:

    Provost’s Graduate Fellowship

    Available to new graduate students who are U.S. citizens, resident aliens, or international

    Nominees will be expected to fall within the top 25% of students admitted to the program (average of prior four years)

    Provides a $10,000 fellowship ($5,000 Fall and $5,000 Spring) and full tuition (not local fees) for one year; provides summer tuition (not local fees) for 6 hours

    For more information about various fellowships, please reference the following website: funding.graduate.ucf.edu/fellowships/.

    National Awards

    Fast Web Free Scholarship Search  
    fastweb.monster.com/ib/scholarships-1f

    UCF Professional Development Programs

    Instructor Training and Development

    The Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning (FCTL) promotes excellence in all levels of teaching at the University of Central Florida. To that end, they offer several programs for the professional development of Graduate Teaching Assistants at UCF.

    GTA Training (mandatory for employment as a GTA)

    The GTA Training sponsored by Faculty Center for Teaching and Leaning is mandatory in order to be hired as a Graduate Teaching Associate (Position Code 9183) or Graduate Teaching Assistant (Position Code 9184), students who have not previously completed the UCF GTA Training requirement must complete the online Legal Module and GT Assistant training and attend the face-to-face GT Associate training.

    Students who are non-native speakers of English (and do not have a degree from a U.S. institution) must pass the SPEAK exam before they will be permitted to teach as a Graduate Teaching Associate or Graduate Teaching Assistant. The SPEAK Exam will be offered by the Center for Multilingual Multicultural Studies before the start of classes every fall and spring semester.

    Please refer to following website for more information. www.graduate.ucf.edu/pagegen/index.cfm?PageID=156

    GTA Teaching Certificate
    This certificate program consists of group and individualized instruction by Faculty Center staff and experienced UCF professors. Textbooks and materials are provided, and a stipend is offered to current UCF graduate students who complete the certificate. For more information visit: www.fctl.ucf.edu/events/GTAprograms  

    Career Services and Experiential Learning

    www.crc.ucf.edu/home/

    Graduate career development issues are unique and include evaluating academic and nonacademic career choices, discussing graduate school effect on career choices, as well as learning, evaluating, and refining networking and interviewing skills. Whatever your needs, the offices of Career Services and Experiential Learning offer services and resources to aid in the career exploration and job search of Master and Doctoral students in every academic discipline.

    Graduate Student Association

    www.gsa.graduate.ucf.edu/

    Graduate Research Forum

    The Graduate Research Forum, sponsored by the College of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Student Association, provides opportunity for students to showcase their research and creative projects and to receive valuable feedback from faculty judges. Awards for best poster and best oral presentation in each category will be given and all participants will receive recognition. graduate.ucf.edu/researchforum 

    Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

    The Society was founded in 1957 as the Human Factors Society of America. The Society's mission is to promote the discovery and exchange of knowledge concerning the characteristics of human beings that are applicable to the design of systems and devices of all kinds.

    The Society furthers serious consideration of knowledge about the assignment of appropriate functions for humans and machines, whether people serve as operators, maintainers, or users in the system. And, it advocates systematic use of such knowledge to achieve compatibility in the design of interactive systems of people, machines, and environments to ensure their effectiveness, safety, and ease of performance.

    The Society encourages education and training for those entering the human factors and ergonomics profession and for those who conceive, design, develop, manufacture, test, manage, and participate in systems. For more information on the society go to www.hfes.org/.

    UCF Student Chapter of the HFES

    Members of the UCF Student Chapter of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES) are mostly graduate students in the Applied Experimental and Human Factors Psychology and Industrial Engineering programs. The Student Chapter gives members the opportunity to further their professional goals by encouraging members to attend conferences and sponsoring colloquia where members have the opportunity to meet the foremost researchers in the field.

    Job Search

    UCF's Career Services department offers a wide range of programs and services designed to assist graduate students. These services include evaluation and exploration of career goals, preparation for the job search and job search resources. To learn more, visit their website at www.career.ucf.edu.

    Our graduates commonly obtain human factors positions in industry (e.g., IBM, Boeing, Microsoft), take on teaching positions at leading universities, engage in private consulting, or become involved with various government agencies (e.g., National Transportation Safety Board, Naval Air Warfare Center).

    Many of our graduate students have the opportunity to work both off-campus for a variety of different employers such as Army Research Institute (ARI), Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division (NAWCTSD), Team Performance Lab (TPL), Institute for Simulation and Training (IST), In-Touch Computing, CHI Systems, and Siemens-Westinghouse. Internships have been conducted at NASA-Ames, NAWCTSD, IBM, Microsoft, and Johnson Engineering.

    For specific services or resources provided by the academic program, please contact the graduate program director or academic advisor.

    Forms

    • College of Graduate Studies Forms
      A listing of general forms and files for graduate students including student services and records and graduation forms.
    • College of Sciences Graduate Forms
      Link provides a list of various forms for graduate students in the College of Science. 
    • Doctoral Committee Status Form
      Dissertation committees must be in place and approved by the Graduate Program Coordinator, the Department Chair/Director, and the COS Associate Dean of Graduate Studies prior to a student's enrollment into Dissertation Research (PSY 7980)
    • Graduate Petition Form
      When unusual situations arise, petitions for exceptions to policy may be requested by the student. Depending on the type of appeal, the student should contact his/her program adviser to begin the petition process.
    • Psi-DOCS Forms
      Link provides a list of forms for psychology graduate students.
    • Traveling Scholar Form
      If a student would like to take advantage of special resources available on another campus but not available on the home campus; for example, special course offerings, research opportunities, unique laboratories and library collections, this form must be completed and approved.

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